ASSASSINATION & MOURNING MATERIAL

969. The only extant example. A fabulous mourning vase, 8 3/4" tall, with photographic-like presentation of the martyred Lincoln, 1865. One minor restoration to tip of one leaf at top of cluster, etched on bottom with studio copyright: "ED.103.4.M." One should appreciate that Lincolniana of this nature is truly coveted as works of art on china. While Lincoln mourning/memorial vases come onto the market with some frequency, the value is directly tied to the condition, presentation, and uniqueness for each specific piece. And this lovely tribute is about as fine as we have ever seen. And, the fact that this special porcelain from Germany is not known within the Lincoln community makes it particularly desirable. This special work employs several rather incongruous design elements that make it quite attractive. The German copying of a traditional Victorian form - typical of English Staffordshire from the period - with the addition of a Greek key design pattern at the base is intriguing. The use of Lincoln's ubiquitous Brady portrait after a studio sitting on February 9, 1864 is not particularly rare... save for the exquisite detail and fine craftsmanship employed on this piece. This is a remarkable opportunity - the single finest piece of period, mourning china we have ever encountered! (Est. $6,000-8,000)
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The only Lincoln funeral admittance ticket known to belong to a close associate.

970. Special Pass to Lincoln's official funeral held in the East Room of the White House. The observance assembled on April 19th and represented the official Federal service with only six hundred passes (North, South, and East) issued to dignitaries, Members of Congress, and leading figures of the day. The number of passes was limited due to the small capacity of the East Room. On heavy white stock, 3 1/4 x 5" with bold black border. Minor wear, tiny corner chips and slight album mount remnants on verso, bold and cleaner than most. Now... what makes this specimen quite special is the fact that it belonged to Lincoln's Springfield collegue Orville Browning. Orville Hickman Browning (1806-81), an Illinois lawyer, Representative and Senator, served with Lincoln in the Black Hawk War; helped establish the Republican Party in Illinois; was appointed to the Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Stephen A. Douglas; later appointed by President Andrew Johnson as Sec. of the Interior, also handling the duties of Attorney General. The accompanying letter of provenance states that this ticket came from the Springfield Lincolniana dealer Harry Ellsworth Barker who obtained personal effects from the Browning family. The only other example we had - that specimen without any provenance whatsoever - sold two years ago for more than $4,000. (Rail Splitter Auction #8, Lot 874, $3,630 plus buyer's premium.) This is a fine piece of history. (Est. $2,500-4,500)
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"Crutch Extra!" An extremely early broadside of Lincoln's assassination.

971. One of the first broadsides describing the assassination of President Lincoln at Ford's Theatre. Probably printed by a local Washington printer, the broadside is an eyewitness account. It includes the initial $10,000 reward offered by General Christopher Augur, which was soon increased dramatically. The piece also describes the attack on Secretary Seward and erroneously reports the death of his son. It also states that the rumor that Booth has been arrested is probably false. Additionally, the piece reports, "A letter found in Mr. Booth's trunk identifies him as the President's murder." This is likely the letter written by Sam Arnold to Booth telling him he wanted nothing more to do with the conspiracy to kidnap Lincoln...the letter led authorities to Arnold as well. Archivally rice-paper backed to museum standards. 5 3/4 x 13 3/8", extremely fine presentation. A unique (yes... we DO mean "one of a kind") historic document! (Est. $3,000-4,000)
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The official funeral procession in Springfield!

972. Black-bordered Lincoln funeral broadside, 9.5 x 12.75" detailing the "Obsequies of President Lincoln/Order of Funeral Procession." Signed in type by Gen. John McClernand as Grand Marshal, Brig. Gen. John Cook, commanding the District of Illinois, and James Oakes, Bvt. Brig. Gen. The text lists prominent individuals and organizations slated to march in Lincoln's hometown funeral, May 4, 1865. At the rear of the funeral procession will be "Colored persons." This rare piece of history also details the route and the schedule for firing salutes. Attached to mount by archival tape at left margin, light wear at edge, professionally silked, small loss of individual letters from repaired tears, otherwise very good. We know of just one other example to recently come onto the market, offered by a prominent book dealer at $4,000. (Est. $1,500-2,500)
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973. Pristine Lincoln Funeral Broadside 1865, Philadelphia, PA, near mint. 18" x 6" titled "FUNERAL HONORS TO THE LATE PRESIDENT." Black-bordered sheet details the exact order of procession for the April 20, 1865 service for Lincoln in Philadelphia. An extensive list of all those who participated in the ceremony, along with their position in line, marching from Independence Hall to Christ Church. Practically every political, military and social figure of the day took part. Pristine condition, lightly toned, one horizontal fold. Fantastic. (Est. $900-1,200)
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974. Tremendously rare mourning broadside. "HE BEING DEAD YET SPEAKETH." A wonderful tribute, the only example we know of, 13.25 x 17" with thin decorative border, published by Clark & Thayer of Boston and printed by E.F. Rollins of Boston. The broadside features a portrait of Lincoln with quotes from the martyred President on the Declaration of Independence and extracts from the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates. Additional elements include Lincoln's favorite poem, etc. Light horizontal toning from old frame and similar toning at one spot in title detracting little and accentuating age and appearance. A wonderful rarity. (Est. $800-1,000)
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Period-issued souvenir - an 1865 facsimile of the original playbill.

975. From the moment following that fateful gunshot, the need to possess a tangible link to the tragedy in Washington was all-encompassing. Entrepreneurs - including those directly involved with events that night - devised all sorts of "keepsakes" to sell. Case in point: the different issues of the "Ford's Theatre Playbills." There were three different "correct" original printings... one of which is theoretically known to exist with one copy thought extant. Then there were those printed the following day for the doorkeeper at Ford's Theatre, John Buckingham, using the same press and typesetting as the originals. The only study of the different bills and their progeny, Walter Brenner's 1937 essay The Ford Theatre Lincoln Assassination Playbills, details the specimen offered here as a rare "Brown Copy," bearing the correct publisher's imprint, "Polkinhorn." The Library of Congress owns just two playbills: one of the first issues and a bill identical to this example (which can be viewed on their web-page - LOC call # Portfolio 204, Folder 58e). This copy is definitely letter-press printed, on period rag, has one minor streak of skipped inking due to a paper fold-over, and is in overall fine condition. The originals are very scarce and command up to $10,000+ The Buckingham examples now sell in excess of $1,500. This 1865 issue after the original is certainly a desirable display piece from the period and well worth... (Est. $500-700)
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John Wilkes Booth lives! The ultimate conspiracy theory... and HOAX!

976. (BOOTH, John Wilkes.) Christopher C. Ritter was an Indiana butcher who claimed that after the assassination, Booth successfully escaped to South America. (See: Weichman, A True History of the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and of the Conspiracy of 1865, pp. 482-483) Group of Autograph Letters Signed, including: April 26, 1895, 4pp., to E. Rosenburger, "The slayer of President Lincoln is alive. I have hundreds of letters on that score from him to me, but his lips are sealed to anyone but me..." Also, one from June 27, 1897, on the reverse of which Ritter has typed a poem "Expansive Delusion-or-What Ritter knows of Lincoln's Assassination and J. Wilkes Booth's Movement Afterward." Ritter pens that he is looking for some financial backing to help publish his theories: "I would like to take a partner to furnish the money to publish the first 2,000 books..." Also, July 28, 1897, concerning the selling of photos: "the cost of any of these I leave to your own sense of Justice as any income from this source is a great help to me to bring out my book which will have 42 plates of photos of persons connected with the narrative..." Another example of an opportunist seeking profit from supposedly having "inside knowledge" on the great conspiracy. An interesting series of letters. Included in this collection is a two-page poem written by Ritter and an alleged Autograph Letter Signed from John Wilkes Booth TO Ritter, November 12, 1873. (Supposedly in "pig Latin" with a period translation by the great Lincoln collector Emerson.) "We had been over Venezuela for some months and on our return visited Paragrawe (sic)... Have you heard of Edwin or how Kathy and her child are getting along..." On the copy letter, Ritter has noted "this is a copy of a letter written by Booth as J.W. Hunoth, Jr." The "translation" on letterhead from the office of another early Lincoln collector, A.E. Fostell, who aquired most of the Emmerson collection at the turn of the century. Together with three photographs - two cabinet cards and a mounted albumen, detailed in period ink as the "real victim of the shooting by Boston Corbett." It is a portrait of Edward Fox who was supposedly misidentified as John Wilkes Booth. Also: a signed cabinet card of Col. C.C. Ritter, dated 1895. An archive detailing a wonderful early hoax which was believed by many. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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The Assassin's Assassin!

977. CORBETT, Boston. (Thomas P.) Known as "Lincoln's Avenger," Corbett (1832-?) remains one of the most enigmatic figures in history. An extraordinarily eccentric evangelical hatter form Boston who, as a member of the 16th New York Cavalry in 1865, he pursued and killed John Wilkes Booth. Corbett was so obsessed by his Christianity that he kept his hair long (as Jesus would have) and even castrated himself to avoid temptation by women. After the Civil War, he removed to Kanas where he was committed to the inane asylum after attempting to break up a meeting of the legislature with a revolver. He escaped the asylum in 1888 and disappeared forever. Signed calling card with addition of rank: "Boston Corbett, Sergt. Co. L., 16th N.Y. Cavalry." A bold, clean specimen, very desirable. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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978. CORBETT, Boston. Signature on a slip of lined paper, 3/4 x 5'. Signature is a bit faint otherwise a nice specimen. (Est. $500-700)
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Just weeks after he was nearly murdered, Seward thanks New York's Chamber of Commerce for their well-wishes. One of his earliest letters following Lincoln's assassination and the brutal attacks upon himself and his son by the conspirator Payne. 979. SEWARD, William H. Extremely rare LS on black-bordered mourning stationery, written while recuperating from life-threatening injuries, 2pp. on letter headed: "Unofficial - Department of State, Washington. June 9, 1865 To Mesrs. Wm. K. Strong, F.S. Winston, N.M. Vermilye, Alexander N. Bradford & others, Committee of & Members of the Chamber of Commerce, New York City." No doubt an effort to even just sign his name, the crippled Secretary of State sends a warm letter: "Gentlemen, Having become so far convalescent as to be permitted to inform myself of incidents which occurred during the early stages of my illness, I have today for the first time come to the knowledge of the resolutions which you had the kindness to address to me on the 19th of April, in the name and on behalf of the Chamber of Commerce of the City of New York. There are no words in which I could adequately express the sense, I entertain, of the kindness, which has been shown to me by my fellow citizens generally during that illness. You will, therefore, I am sure, be content with this hasty and simple, but grateful acknowledgment of the especial kindness which is manifested in your communication and you will be pleased to convey the acknowledgment to the Chamber of Commerce - With grateful & affectionate regards, Your obedient servant, William H. Seward." Usual folds, tiny remnant of mounting at margin, bold writing and content. A fine, touching piece of history. (Est. $700-900)
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Mary Surratt's Lawyer plans to speak with President Johnson on the fate of another conspirator, Beverly Tucker.

980. JOHNSON, Reverdy. (1796-1876) Civil War Senator from Maryland, Attorney General under President Taylor, considered one of the ablest Constitutional lawyers of the period. His argument as counsel for the defense in the Dred Scott case is known to have greatly influenced the Supreme Court, particularly Chief Justice Roger Taney. He played an important role in the unsuccessful defense of Mary E. Surratt. ALS, 2 pp., Washington, February 1, 1868, to Frederick G. Skinner, former Confederate Colonel of the 1st Virginia (he assuming command from the officer killed in Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg). Johnson states that he is optimistic that a talk with President Johnson will calm matters that apparently concern their mutual friend Beverly Tucker. As of early 1868, Beverly Tucker was still in exile in Canada, worried that his return would lead to arrest having been named as a Confederate conspirator in the assassination of Lincoln. (The proclamation and reward for Tucker had been revoked late in 1865, but Tucker only returned to the U.S. in 1872 when he quietly resumed his life.) The letter reads: "My dear Frederick, I have your note of the 28th last, with its enclosure. The latter is as requested destroyed. I will lose no time in seeing the President upon the subject you referred to, and can not doubt success. You shall know the result of my interview at the earliest moment. Sincerely regretting the distressing condition in which our friend Tucker's family is placed, I remain Truly yours, Reverdy Johnson." Some light damp stains/toning throughout, horizontal tear on last page through closing salutation, mended from verso. Interesting content. (Est. $200-400)
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An extremely rare autograph...the only actor on stage when Lincoln was shot!

981. HAWK, Harry. A permanent member of Laura Keene's company touring as both her manager and the comedic lead in "Our American Cousin," Hawk found himself alone on stage at Ford's Theatre on April 14, 1865, just as Booth shot President Lincoln. Hawk remained the only actor on stage when Booth jumped to the stage - fleeing to the wings in terror as Booth cried out "sic semper tyrannis" ("Thus it shall ever be for tyrants"). Autograph Letter Signed to the famous Lincoln collector A.E. Fostell (his legendary collection exhibited at the turn-of-the-century), from Toledo, OH, May, 1894. Fostell had evidently been entreating Hawk to furnish a picture of himself, and here the actor writes: "Bro. Fostell, After years of promise, I at length keep my word and enclose you [no longer present] my home[l]y phiz. Yours very truly, Harry Hawk." Closely, irregularly trimmed with roughness at top touching dateline; waterstain/soiling, but still very readable... and profoundly rare. One of only three known examples. (Est. $500-750)
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The man who presided over the conspirators' trial orders a transfer for the man who presided over Lincoln's autopsy.

982. HUNTER, David. (1802-86) Close Lincoln friend who accompanied the President-elect for a portion of his inaugural journey from Springfield to Washington, and commanded the detail that escorted the return of his body to Illinois. Considered one of Lincoln's more controversial generals - a man absolutely despised in the South - Hunter first entered military service after graduating from West Point in 1822. During the War he held several commanding posts. He was severely wounded while leading one of two divisions on the flank march at the 1st Bull Run. After his recovery and service in other posts - including replacing the command of General John C. Fremont - in late 1862, Hunter found himself in South Carolina. Hunter would infuriate Confederates in that state by announcing the "abolition" of slavery in the department and forming the 1st South Carolina Colored Infantry. Washington, still hoping for a peace proposal, disavowed his policies. Hunter's policy of burning Confederate land and properties - including the torching of the Virginia Governor's residence and the Virginia Military Institute - earned him a death sentence if ever captured. His presiding over the trial of the conspirators was his last active role in military service. War Date manuscript D.S. 8 x 10", St. Louis, September 17, 1861 ordering "The following named gentlemen, members of Maj. Gen Hunters Staff, will accompany him form St. Louis to Rolla, Missouri..." Below, six officers are named, including Surgeon J. K. Barnes, listed as "Medical Director". Barnes, (1817-83) would later be appointed by Lincoln to become Surgeon General of the United States. In his capacity as Surgeon General, he attended to Lincoln after he was shot. Barnes also attended to James Garfield after his shooting at the hand of Charles Guiteau. Usual folds, very light foxing, otherwise fine. An excellent association piece. (Est. $300-500)
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983. HUNTER, David. Bold, distinct signature with addition of his military rank on autograph panel. A pristine specimen. (Est. $100-150)
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He hunted Booth and witnessed his demise.

984. Payment letter and voucher for First Lt. Edward Doherty, boldly signed by the officer. Doherty signs for receipt of his October 1868 monthly pay on December 1, 1868. As stated on his memorial in Arlington National Cemetery, Doherty was: "One of three officers in command of the troops that pursued and killed John Wilkes Booth after the Killing of Abraham Lincoln." Doherty was serving in the 16th New York Volunteer Cavalry in 1865 when his unit was selected for the pursuit of John Wilkes Booth. Some water stains, otherwise very good. Also quite scarce. (Est. $300-400)
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985. ECKERT, Thomas Thompson.
(1825-1910) Eckert organized and supervised U.S. military telegraph during the Civil War and spent a great deal of time with the President in that office. In fact, Lincoln invited Eckert to attend the performance of Our American Cousin, but the officer declined at the direction of Sec. Stanton who said that he could not spare Eckert from work that night. Later, Eckert was the administrator of telegraph companies controlled by Jay Gould and others, and eventually was President of Western Union. Scarce ALS, 2pp., January 23, 1894, on "Executive Office, Western Union Telegraph Company New York," letterhead, to John Applegate of Red Bank, NJ, recommending a Mr. Van Bruut as a witness in an ongoing court case regarding work on two pavilions. Minor tears at folds. With original posted transmittal cover. A fine example that is tough to source. (Est. $200-300)
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An original, unpublished work... by someone who was a true eyewitness!

986. GARRETT, Richard Baynham. Son of Richard H. Garrett who as an eleven year old boy witnessed the death of presidential assassin, John Wilkes Booth on his family's farm, April 26, 1865. AMsS. 41pp., July 9th 1896. An unpublished fictional story entitled, Boy's Life In Dixie During the Civil War. Written in the hand of Garrett in brown pen on lined paper, slight soiling on a few pages, quite fine. Garrett wrote this story based on his own experiences as a child while growing up in Virginia during the Civil War and had intended to publish it but never did. Some selected parts...The ragged Veterans in their faded suits of gray who fought as never fought in this world before, they have not been forgotten....Then the story has been told of the noble deeds and unselfish devotion of the women of the South...We hear said with throbbing hearts of the suffering of those Spartan mothers who gave their sons to die for their country while they themselves battled at home....So I desire to right a long continued wrong and to speak a tardy word for long neglected hero- the Southern boy of the Civil War Times.....I don't mean to tell the story of the soldier boys of the South. My hero is the boy who stayed at home and suffered...." Garrett proceeds to tell of the hardships and the way of life for a young boy, too young to fight but old enough to be the man at home during the Civil War. An excellent first hand account of life during the Civil War and, most important, an unpublished manuscript. Also included is Garrett's original typed copy of this same manuscript. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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987. As detailed in the previous lot, Richard Baynham Garrett was a boy of eleven years when "Mr. Boyd" came to the home of his father, Richard Henry Garrett near Port Royal Virginia that April night in 1865. The events that followed, John Wilkes Booth's two-day stay in the family barn, his capture and death, made an indelible impression on the mind of this alert lad who witnessed them. Victimized by the circulation of false reports, the Garrett family for years was as loth to speak of the tragedy as was the Booth family. Later the young boy would grow to be a respectable Baptist Minister having attended Louisville Baptist Theological Seminary. Additionally, he would become one of the premier lecturers of that time on the subject of the assassination of President Lincoln and capture and death of John Wilkes Booth. He wrote the Booth family regarding the dying message of John Wilkes and send a lock of his hair for the assassin's mother. He would use the correspondence, photographs and artifacts he received in his lectures. Here is an original cabinet photograph of Garrett. (Est. $300-500)
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988. He was there! Rare, period souvenir-sheet: "The Assassination of President Lincoln", self-published by Joseph H. Hazelton, (An eye witness)." It seems everyone was trying to "cash in" on that horrible event! This includes a later-in-life photo of the author and a bold autograph at bottom. Hazelton recounts how he met John Wilkes Booth earlier that day and then later witnessed the assassination itself. One ink smudge from the signature, otherwise fine. This is the first example we have seen. (Est. $300-500)
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989. Special Order No. 64, Headquarters... Relay House, MD., May 6th, 1865. A unique holographic military order declaring that: "In compliance with orders from Dept. Hdqrs. the national flag will be displayed at half staff from the Hdqrs. of each Post or Camp in this command until the 16th, inst, thirty days from date of Genl. Order No. 66. War Dept. A.G.O. April 16th. 1865. By command of Brig. Genl. C. B. Tyler." Signed by the acting "Capt. and A.A.A. Genl." A rare piece revealing a component of military protocol in the official mourning period of the fallen commander. The only example we are aware of. (Est. $200-250)
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April 19, 1865 letter about the assassination mentioning - and including - a piece of mourning crepe.

990. Sad and heartfelt letter by Wilson Minar regarding the assassination of President Lincoln. Also included is a piece of the crepe badges people wore during mourning. The letter reads, "Dear Sister, I will not commence this epistle as I did the other, since I has so severe a rebuke, but please excuse me ?? that was a party letter to you and Father knowing you would understand that part I omited to address you in that appropriate and courteous manner I should have done. I assure you it was not for the want of the right feeling, I received your letter on Monday datrd April 14, the day to be remembered in all future time, by all civilized people in the world for the most atrocious and vilinous tragedy ever was comited by man namely the assassination of our beloved President Abraham Lincoln, and attempted assassination of our Secretary of State, may the all wise god deliver those infernall conspirators to justice who have been and some still remain in our midst such is my prayer and likewise of every true American, this City is in a perfect gloom over the loss of the nation. The people have united with allmost one accord to drape their houses with mourning tis a perfect novelty to visit the City to see the display of mourning monday was a day set apart for illumination and rejoicing over our late victory but that has been abandoned and ???? and crape placed instead on recent of the terrible the people ??? and dismayed and allmost the hearts where seen shuder with indignation and dred a tear would be seen ??? its way from the corner of my eye, as I sit down to wrote this I have just returned from church the day is realy sad bells are tolling and crape badges displayed, solom excartations and singing in the churches at noon, the ladies god bless them respect our loss very freely and bitterly many of them bathing their faces with their own tears. A word about myself and I must close. I am enjoying good health and hope you are the same business is very ??? and I don't know what to do for the best though I've not been out of employment yet, my friend that I spoke of before still wants me to go with him to the Oil Lands but I still hesitate on account of my most highly esteemed who sternly opposes it, if I should conclude to go I will write to you before going. I heard not much to my astonishment that Father had been getting married again, it was very well for him to tell me to come and see him at his new home in New Haven after the first of April and I would be treated well by the lady that he was going to live with there while he was telling me I thought I seen through it and made the remark to him I suppose you are going to get married are you, he gave me an ?? answer by saying that he was just going to live with her and do as he pleased, god bless him I hope he will. You spoke of us being brothers and sisters in Christ I sincerely hope we are as I have taken up my cross and am trying to serve him and I hope your doing the same be firm and steadfast in your belief and diligently your duties. O, how I regret I left it so long. Keep this piece of crape though small as it is as a lasting momento of our President sent you by your adopted brother who once was a copperhead but has now lost all respect for them which I represented them. I was blind but now I see. I wish you to understand that I voted for our Martyred president there are some in those place who rejoice over it but they must not do it to loud several in the City lost their lives for that within a few days. Write soon. Wilson Minar" added to the other side: "I spoke to mary about those leaves and her photograph but she has none at present." (Est. $1,500-1,800)
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"I could not have been more shocked had it been my Father." A rare letter written on the day of Lincoln's death.

991. Quite remarkable ALS, 4pp., from Harry S. Rimhold on Joel J. Baily & Co. of Philadelphia letterhead, to George Hensel. The letter, written April 15, 1865 is accompanied by an illustrated cover picturing the building that houses the Baily company - stamped and postal canceled on that same fateful date. Highly unusual in that most letters regarding Lincoln's death were written or posted days later. In part: "Good Friend Geo, This is a sad day in Phila. and not only here but all over the U.S. All the stores are draped in black, all flags at half mast, and very near all the stores closed, we are closed. I could not have been more shocked had it been my Father." Rimhold then turns to business, in part: "Trade has been good...We have a good Ladies white & brown hose at 2.50 per doz. As for trade next week now I can not tell..." An evocative piece and quite rare given the historic date. (Est. $500-750)
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Attending Lincoln's funeral... an eyewitness account.

992. ALS, 3 1/2 pp., Cairo, IL, May 9, 1865, from Robert Steele to his friend. He writes, in part: "...I attended the funeral of our lamented President, last week, at Springfield, and heard the oration by Bishop Simpson. I saw the remains of that great and good man. I was filled with awe as I passed by, and gazed upon the remains. Bishop Simpson said, Mr. Lincoln was the author of the greatest production that ever emanated from an uninspired mind, alluding to the Emancipation Proclamation. I visited Mr. Lincoln's Residence in Springfield. The furniture which Mr. Lincoln used is still in the house. A book is kept for visitors to register their names. I went via St. Louis, and had a very pleasant trip...The war is at an end and the armies will soon take up their march towards home; there will be many vacant seats, and many sad hearts but our Country is saved and treason is punished. I hope our Government may meet out justice to the leaders - the murders of our lamented President..." Neatly penned, very fine. (Est. $600-800)
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Commenting on the conspirator Arnold and his internment in the Dry Tortugas... by someone stuck there as well!

993. A fine ALS, December 19, 1902, New York, from Dr. Andrew Hermance Smith to Captain Edmund Louis Zalinski. Smith writes to a fellow veteran and historian, in small part: "I have not seen the charges made by Arnold. Can you send me copies of the papers obtaining them? I shall be most glad to deny that any cruelties were perpetrated there while I was at Tortugas..." Dr. Smith served in the Dry Tortugas Prison after the Civil War while Samuel Arnold was incarcerated. Arnold, a childhood friend of Booth, was involved with the conspiracy to first kidnap then assassinate the President but never actively joined the scheme. He was nonetheless sentenced to life in prison at hard labor, but pardoned by President Johnson in 1869. Smith was an assistant surgeon with the 43rd NY Volunteers, later a surgeon for the NY 94th and served at the Tortugas. This letter was written when false reports of Arnold's death hit the newspapers with extensive coverage of the conspirator's biography and claims. (Arnold remains the primary source of evidence that the Confederate Government had nothing to do with the plot.) Pristine, fine content. (Est. $300-500)
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994. An elegant, mourning badge, 3 x 11", with affixed 13 x 15 mm. ferrotype at the center of a layered rosette. The mourning badge has rose tinting at the cheeks and is housed in a beaded brass rim. The ribbon is pinned with a period note "Badge worn to Lincoln's Funeral." The piece is housed in a decorative shadow-box frame, 9 1/4 x 17" overall. A beautiful, evocative piece - one of the best such display items we've ever seen. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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995. An archivally framed and matted CDV of Lincoln by Brady. There is also a glass on the back so the verso of the carte is visible. Small nick to the albumen at right corner, mottling to the image, otherwise fine. Also in the frame is a rare and pristine ribbon bearing the word "Union League of Rhode Island. In Memory of Our Departed Brother, Abraham Lincoln." This beautifully illustrated ribbon, 3 x 7", was worn at the funeral service for Lincoln and notes the pronouncement of the the "Eulogy by Wm. Lloyd Garrison", the famous abolitionist. Frame overall is 15 x 12'. (Est. $800-1,200)
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996. Beautiful 2 x 6" mourning ribbon: "A Nation's Loss. Died April 15, 1865." One of the best designed memorial silks; truly mint condition. (Est. $400-500)
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997. Once again, arguably, one of the best designed mourning ribbons - this example in minty condition save for a tiny mark at the very bottom of the blank selvege. An example sold two years back in our 8th annual Rail Splitter auction for $650 against an estimate of... (Est. $300-400) Click Here to View Image


998. 2 x 6" silk "The Nation Mourns His Loss He Still Lives In The Hearts Of the People." A bold design in mint condition. (Est. $300-500)
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999. A French tribute to Lincoln. Exceptionally rare 4 x 5.5" mourning silk imported from Lyon. This specific design, 1865 dated, is found occasionally as a plate in French eulogies but not known on fabric. Mounted at corners to display card. A lovely item. (Est. $250-500)
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1000. Lincoln memorial ribbon issued by Philadelphia's Union League. 2 1/4 x 5" silk taffeta with bearded portrait within black borders and the initials "U.L.A." A scarce design; superb condition. (Est. $250-350)
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1001. 1 x 4" purple silk memorial ribbon with affixed albumen photo (#O91), "4th July, 1776, Washington 4th July 1865, Lincoln." Period ribbon produced to memorialize the first 4th of July following Lincoln's death, and Washington's first Independence Day celebration following the War. Rare and in excellent condition. (Est. $400-500)
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1002. 2 x 6" paper mourning ribbon, " Our Martyred Father! We Mourn His Loss." Two light vertical creases, image unaffected, quite nice. (Est. $100-200)
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1003.
A scarce, paper mourning ribbon from the "National Day of Mourning," June 1, 1865. While individual cities -- including those where Lincoln's mortal remains "toured" on the way home to Springfield -- hosted separate funeral services, this ephemeral item was issued for the national day of observance. Light typical age, 8" tall, quite fine. (Est. $200-300)
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1004. A small, quite touching paper mourning ribbon. Measuring just 1.5 x 3.5", bright red and blue elements to flag make this an attractive piece of ephemera. The first example we have encountered. (Est. $150-200)
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1005. One of the classic "tombstone cards," this a rather different embossed design with black mourning rule and appropriate ode. Absolutely pristine condtiion, 3.5 x 5" with raised element. Quite fine. (Est. $150-250)
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1006. Similar to preceding lot, another embossed Lincoln mourning card, 3 1/2 x 5". The raised monument is inscribed "In Memory of Abraham Lincoln President of the United States..." Fine. (Est. $100-150)
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An invitation that precipitated a riot.

1007. Each stop of Lincoln's last journey home was anxiously awaited by throngs of respectful mourners. The itinerary was advertised in advance - processions were well-organized with the hours of viewing prescribed. At Philadelphia's Independence Hall, it was estimated that 300,000 people viewed the casket as the President lay in state. The Mayor of the City, however, used poor judgment arranging an advance showing to select invitees the evening before the official proceedings. When news of this abuse was known, it precipitated a riot among the populace. This is one of those exceptionally scarce invitations. (See next lot for an example of the general invitiation.) 4 x 2 1/2" on coated stock with black mourning borders, "City Councils of Philadelphia. Obsequies of Abraham Lincoln, Late President of the United States, Philadelphia, April 22d, 1865." Accompanied by the original envelope with black, mourning rules, the card has light toning corresponding to the position it maintained in the envelope. This is the first example we recall seeing in the market. (Est. $500-1,000)
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1008. Carte-sized "In Memoriam" card. On black-bordered, coated stock, these scarce ephemeral items more than articulate almost everyone's desire to obtain something they could display... some way to recognize the shared grief during the official period of mourning. When found, these are usually terribly foxed... this is a bright and clean specimen. (Est. $150-200)
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1009. "The National Police Gazette" published April 29, 1865, 4pp. large folio, featuring huge woodcuts on the first page relating to the assassination. One panel shows Booth fleeing Ford's Theater; another depicts the conveying of Lincoln to the Peterson home; another shows the arrest of G.A. Atzerodt. One panel is entitled "Identification of Payne by the Negro Servant as the Assassin of Sec. Seward." Another is shown as the "Arrest of Payne at the House of Surratt." And one is titled "Tarring and Feathering at Swampscott, Mass., of a Justifier of the Assassin." The entire second page and most of the third page, with black mourning rules, are dedicated to the capture of the conspirators, the funeral and the nation at mourning, and calls for retribution on the South. Typical foxing, eight inch tear at right, lies flat and could be repaired, three other small tears at right edge, each lays flat and can be easily restored. Scarce. (Est. $100-300)
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1010. An evocative mourning songsheet by Charles Magnus, tastefully matted and framed, 10 x 13" overall, a touching tribute and handsome display item. (Est. $200-250)
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1011. Mourning sheet music "Dedicated to the Nation. Performed by Menter's Band. Lincoln's Funeral March by C. Hess." St. Louis, J. L. Peters. Disbound with some minor soiling, a bold design. (Est. $150-200)
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1012. Mourning Sheet Music. Rest. Spirit. Rest. Grand Requiem March to the Memory of Abraham Lincoln. By E. Hoffman, published by William A. Pond, New York, 1865, 7pp. separated, usual age, minor horizontal fold, one of the better designs. (Est. $150-200)
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1013. "Farewell Father, Friend and Guardian" mourning sheet music by L.M. Dawn. Published by Root & Cady, Chicago, black-bordered, light age foxing, disbound at spine, complete. A scarce issue. (Est. $100-150)
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1014. One of the very programs given to VIP's and dignitaries... those attending the service for the martyred president in Washington. "OFFICIAL ARRANGEMENTS at Washington for the funeral solemnities of the late ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, who died at the Seat of Government, on Saturday, the 15th day of April, 1865." 4pps., last page blank, one age burn at bottom edge, signed in type by W.A. Nichols, Asst. Adj. General. Details the order of the procession and those set to march behind Lincoln's body... culminating with the all-encompassing group "Citizens and Strangers." A necessary component to a comprehensive collection... now hard to source. (Est. $200-300)
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1015. Lincoln funeral circular from Ohio, April 19th, 1865. 5 x 9", some typical toning and edge roughness at the bottom which does not affect the text. On April 19th, Lincoln's body traveled down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. - the first stop on the journey back to his beloved Springfield. Also on this day, many towns and cities throughout the country had their own funeral processions to mourn their fallen leader. This piece, from Ohio, announces one such precession. A fine piece of ephemera. (Est. $300-500)
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Horace Greeley Lectures on Lincoln at a Black Church... just months after the assassination.

1016. A printed ticket, 4 x 1.75", for "HORACE GREELEY'S LECTURE, for the BENEFIT of the A. M. E. [African Methodist Episcopal] Zion Church, at SLAUSON HALL, THURSDAY EVE'G, OCT. 26th. [1865] -- SUBJECT -- ABRAHAM LINCOLN." The congregation, based in Auburn, New York, was associated with the Underground Railroad and counted among its members Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass. Extremely light toning, otherwise fine. Excellent association! (Est. $100-150)
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A true rarity: the first non-newspaper account of the assassination - written before Booth was killed!

1017. Abott, Abott A., The Assassination and Death of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, At Washington, on the 14th of April, 1865. New York, American News Company, 12pp. #M-372. Includes contemporary dispatches and observations. An early account of the crime, considered the first account of the assassination in book form. Printed with black mourning borders. Concludes with "There are millions of people in our unhappy country to-day, who were not favorable to Mr. Lincoln's course. Whatever we may think of their opinions, let us beware of confusing political inimicality with personal hatred." Very well-preserved with some toning and original stitched binding. About as clean an example as to be found. (Est. $600-800)
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The "Complete and Unabridged Edition - Containing the whole of Suppressed Evidence." The FIRST complete report on the crime in Washington.

1018. The Trial of the Assassins and Conspirators... (T.B. Peterson & Brothers, Philadelphia: 1865.) The classic, first definitive account of all the proceedings with numerous engravings. 210pps., brown, tooled cloth, minor loss to spine and cover fading, contents generally bright with just light foxing/dampstain. The illustrations of the courtroom, the conspirators, and scenes detailing the crime are fabulous. A quite fine example of a scarce, important work. (Est. $300-500)
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1019. A rare imprint from that fateful day. April 15, 1865, Navy Department General Order signed in type "Gideon Welles," dealing with seamen convicted of desertion and other crimes. It is surprising that on one of the country's darkest days, Welles still found time and strength to conduct business. It is in extremely fine condition - this is the same copy we sold a few years back and remains the only copy of these orders we've encountered. (Est. $100-200)
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"It is to be observed, that our President had great firmness, combined in proportion with gentleness of spirit."

1020. A Sketch of the Character of Abraham Lincoln: A Discourse... by Augustus Woodbury. One of the scarcest eulogies, this delivered in the Westminster Church, Providence, R.I., June 1, 1865. One of only 300 copies printed, M-826. Woodbury (1825-95) authored several important Civil War studies and biographical works and served as Chaplain-in-Chief of the G.A.R. 28pps. in titled wraps, tiny chip to bottom of front cover and at spine, overall tight and clean. Great content: "'Have you ever seen the President Elect? What is your opinion? Is he like Jackson?' I answered . Lincoln is a man thoroughly honest in his convictions, and devoted to what he believes to be right. He may be slow in making up his mind. But when he has once settled upon any point, you may be sure that he will never be moved from it. He will be firm as Jackson, without Jackson's impetuosity.'" Quite fine. (Est. $100-200)
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1021. A lovely - and scarce - tribute by the great Reverend Henry Ward Beecher. Presentation Memorial to Working Men. Oration at the Raising of `The Old Flag' at Sumter; and Sermon on the Death of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States." (Alexander Ireland and Co., Manchester: 1865.) First edition, 55pp., original limp, green cloth covers, #M-395. Also contains "Prefatory Notes" and a "Prefatory Sketch" of Lincoln by J. H. Estcout, both of Manchester, May 25, 1865. The appendix includes a reprint of Lincoln's Gettysburg address. Fine. (Est. $80-120)
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1022. A supreme Springfield rarity... Address of the National Lincoln Monument Association, Springfield, Illinois. Four-page booklet in titled, yellow wraps, separated pages with chipping at margins, brittle, but complete save for back blank wrap. This is Richard Oglesby's official report on all the by-laws with the Articles of Association for the organization founded in Illinois May, 1865. Every Illinois dignitary involved with this august body is listed with a description of the extensive plans for building the Monument and accompanying burial site building. The final matter addressed is, naturally, on how to raise money for the necessary construction. While the condition is problematic, the document is complete... and one of only three known to remain extant. (Est. $200-400)
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1023. John Wilkes Booth. Fact and Fiction of Lincoln's Assassination, Francis Wilson. (Houghton Mifflin, New York: 1929). M-3155. First edition, 322pps. with illustrations, titled label on yellow cloth, owner's bookplate, light, typical foxing, tight. An important contribution to the subject - many consider this the best Booth biography - prior, of course, to Michael Kauffman's American Brutus! (Est. $100-150)
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1024. A scarce, important work on the assassination and trial: The Judicial Murder of Mary E. Surratt by David Miller DeWitt. (John Murphy & Co., Baltimore: 1895.) M-1165, 259pp. blue cloth. Near Fine, light separation to spine at inside cover, contents bright and clean. An interesting description of the trial and protest of an unfavorable sentence. A tough volume to source typically selling for $350+ when offered. (Est. $200-400)


1025. First notice to Congress on the capture of the fugitive conspirator John Surratt! Government imprint: House of Representatives. Report No. 33. John H. Surratt.. 18pps. booklet "communicating a report of the Secretary of State relating to the discovery and arrest of John H. Surratt." Binding remnants on spine, else quite excellent. A scarce imprint with interesting content. (Est. $100-150)
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1026. Rare two-page imprint containing Andrew Johnson's Message of the President: Distribution of Rewards For Arrest of Assassins of President Lincoln. Interestingly, there is an accompanying message from Sec. of War Stanton extending the deadline by which applicants could appeal for some of the booty. Stanton, of course, would be accused of having some involvement in the conspiracy! (Est. $150-200)
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Hey... you got your man... but burned my barn down!

1027. Extremely scarce official imprint: House of Representatives. Report No. 743. Richard H. Garrett. 8pps. pamphlet containing the report of the committee on War Claims relative to compensation to Richard Garrett for "barn and other property burned at Caroline County, Virginia, in capturing J. Wilkes Booth and D. C. Harold..." This item was last sold by the great Lincoln dealer Ralph Newman (in 1988 for $175) and is accompanied by his priced sleeve. Excellent condition, another rare government report related to the assassination. (Est. $150-250)
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The LARGEST 19th-century photograph of John Wilkes Booth known!

1028. This is an imperial (mammoth boudoir) card, albumen mounted on board, presenting the actor/assassin in what has been described as his "pensive pose." A photograph taken in the Boston studio of Silsbee & Case, this study measures an astounding 7 x 10" - huge by 19th-century standards! There is some rubbing/loss to the surface of the mount below the photo, inconsequential to the presentation, archival framed 16 x 19" overall. This is the only example we know of (ex-Rex Stark) - an impressive display piece! (Est. $1,500-2,500)
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Booth to be buried at sea? A most interesting album page.

1029. Large, original albumen, 3" tall, affixed to a 5 x 7" album leaf, with period clipping entitled "A Requiem." A typical ode to the despot with stanzas noting his final resting place in the briny sea: "Lay our Brutus to sleep in the arms of the deep..." There is a note at the bottom that informs the reader "The above was written by a private citizen in Springfield, Ill., upon learning of Secretary Stanton's order that Booth's body be buried in mid ocean." Well... clearly that did not take place! Nonetheless, a wonderful, original photograph and period item. (Est. $200-300)
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1030. Some poses of Booth are quite difficult to source - including this portrait. This rare CDV has a Wm. Shew, San Francisco imprint with a canceled revenue stamp on verso. Booth is pictured in a full standing pose, and looks quite confident and cocky. The image has excellent tone and detail; just a hint of light soil to the mount. (We sold an example of this carte in our 2000 auction, lot #565, for $920.) An opportunity to acquire a fine Booth rarity! (Est. $500-$700)
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1031. Rare standing CDV of John Wilkes Booth. This scarce carte shows Booth in quite a dashing and debonair pose. A striking image having nice tone and detail, with just two light rub marks on the verso of the mount. A spectacular Booth image that rarely appears on the market. (Est. $400-600)
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1032. Classic Booth CDV with Fredricks, NY imprints. This image has superb tone and detail. Just some light edge wear to the mount, a beautiful carte. (Est. $300-500)
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1033. Booth CDV by Fredricks, NY. A great example with just a hint of age. (Est. $300-500)
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1034. John Wilkes Booth by W. A. Johnson of R.I. Excellent save for small strip of wear at bottom of mount that lifted an area of the margin-rule, otherwise bold and resonant - fault detracts little. (Est. $200-300)
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1035. Booth, imprint by Selby & Dulany of Baltimore on verso. Trim to top of mount as shown, small pinholes along extreme edges, a fine albumen. (Est. $200-250)
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1036. Another rare CDV of Booth, this by M. O'Brien of Chicago. It is, in fact, a copy of this standing pose that remained at the bedside of his brother Edwin until the latter's death in 1893. It still remains there, at the Players Club in New York City. (Edwin's copy was a large format albumen print in an oval mat, and the original photographer is unknown.) Nice tone and clarity. The two dark spots at the lower right look to be from the photographic development process. A great opportunity to acquire a scarce Booth image. (Est. $500-700)
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1037. John Wilkes Booth with the original photographer's imprints, Fredricks of New York. This chest-up pose has excellent tone and detail. (Est. $300-500)
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1038. Another tough Booth pose, the celebrated actor in a standing pose with his right hand resting on a book. Booth looks quite young in this image. Nice tone and detail, a couple of finger print smudges detract little. (Est. $400-600)
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1039. The classic Booth pose, great tone and contrast, an excellent carte. ($150-200)
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1040. Scarce Booth carte - a "jaunty" pose looking quite confident. This scarce CDV is one of the tougher poses. Excellent tone and contrast, but a hint of age to the mount. (Est. $400-600)
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1041. A vivid carte of Booth, circa 1863, on a mount by the original photographer, C.D. Fredricks. Small spot on Booth's forehead, else quite fine. A scarce example. (Est. $150-200)
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1042. Booth and the Devil! A popular carte showing an unholy alliance. Light, typical age/flyspecks, still fine. (Est. $150-200)
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A required reference source on Booth and the Assassination.

1043. Gutman, Richard and Kellie, John Wilkes Booth Himself. (Hired Hand Press, Dover, MA, 1979.) A privately-printed, signed and numbered (run of only 1,050) volume. The definitive source in identifying all known photographs of Booth, the Gutmans have masterfully created the standard now cited in identifying various poses. Believe it or not, we've seen examples sell for $300-400 on internet auctions. (Currently one copy is listed with a dealer at $950!) In near-pristine condition with clean dust-jacket. (Est. $150-250)
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1044. Extremely rare CDV of Lincoln assassination conspirator Lewis Payne, full front and back Alexander Gardner imprints. Payne, a Florida Confederate soldier, had been captured and sent to a Union prison camp but soon escaped. He joined up with Booth and on the night of April 14th attempted to murder Sec. of State William Seward in a scheme to overthrow the Federal government. Payne fled only to be captured later that evening at the boarding house of Mary Surratt, another convicted conspirator. He was hung in July with three other conspirators. The mount lists Payne's aliases, and reads "Arrested as one of the Associates of Booth in the Conspiracy". Finding an original Lewis Payne CDV is almost impossible. We know of a second-generation copy image that sold privately 5 years ago for $4,000. This is a special opportunity to acquire a true Lincoln rarity. (Est. $4,000-5,000)
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A signed photograph of a surgeon who attended Lincoln's autopsy.

1045. Charles Henry Crane (1825-83), Assistant Surgeon General, served with distinction during the Mexican War as well as against "hostile Indians" in the 1850s. In June 1862, he was appointed medical director of the Department of the South. In July 1863 he was recalled to Washington DC to be medical inspector of prisoners of war. He would assist Surgeon General Barnes in the official autopsy of President Lincoln in an upstairs bedroom at the White House. (An interesting tangent: Crane's father, Ichabod Bennett Crane, was a Colonel in the Artillery Corps during the War of 1812, serving alongside Washington Irving. Irving "honored" his former comrade by using his name in the 1819 classic "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.") A carte photograph, some light foxing in background, boldly inscribed on the verso: "Your old friend, C.H. Crane, Asst. Surgeon General, U.S. Army." Profoundly rare and desirable. (Est. $400-500)
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1046. Another scarce study... this of Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General at Gettysburg, a man who attended to BOTH Presidents Lincoln and Garfield when each was mortally wounded. A nice vignette, on a gold-ruled mount. A fine example of a tough photograph to find. (Est. $200-300)
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1047. David Hunter by Anthony/Brady. Hunter (1802-86), a close Lincoln friend who accompanied the President-elect for a portion of his inaugural journey from Springfield to Washington, commanded the detail that escorted the return of his body to Illinois. Considered one of Lincoln's more controversial generals - a man absolutely despised in the South for anouncing the abolition of slavery in South Carolina and forming the 1st South Carolina Colored Infantry. And, his policy of burning Confederate land and properties - including the torching of the Virginia Governor's residence and the Virginia Military Institute - earned him a death sentence if ever captured. His presiding over the trial of the conspirators was his last active role in military service. (Est. $100-200)
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1048. Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt, the man who tried Porter, the "Demon of Andersonville" Wirz, Vallandigham, and presided at the trial of the conspirators. An exceptionally clean example with Anthony/Brady imprint on verso. (Est. $150-250)
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1049. A fabulous carte from the Philadelphia funeral procession, one of the largest such observances. This CDV has it all: full, gold-ruled board, exceptional tone and clarity, 1865 canceled revenue stamp and photographer's label on verso. Pristine! (Est. $500-750)
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1050. Lincoln's home in Springfield with an official delegation posed in the foreground. Some moderate age, quite stirring. We suspect that just about every state that sent representatives must have arranged for one of these keepsakes posing for a local, entrepreneurial photographer! (Est. $150-200)
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1051. "The Assassin's Vision" by Francis Hacker of Rhode Island. Booth, on horseback, drops his dagger as he sees little heads of Lincoln popping out on trees and a standing figure of Lincoln appearing between tree trunks. A very fine example; an odd souvenir of a tragic event. (Est. $150-200)
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1052.
A wonderful depiction of Booth being shot at Garrett's farm, imprint of Francis Hacker, Rhode Island, 1865. The carte, beautifully hand-colored, shows Booth in the burning tobacco barn being shot by Boston Corbett, with co-conspirator David Herold being captured. In excellent condition with just a hint of light soil on the mount. (Est. $300-500)
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1053. Allegorical carte-de-visite. "The Assassin's Doom" published in 1865 by John R. Walsh in Illinois. In this photograph of a painting, a diminutive figure of John Wilkes Booth wanders in a surrealistic landscape. He appears in a shallow river bed infested with serpents. Lincoln, Washington and an unknown figure gaze down from the cliffs to the left, while Lincoln, another unknown figure and human skulls appear in the rock formation to the right. A fine, quite scarce study. (Est. $200-250)
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1054. One of the better mourning cartes... this with a Brooklyn, New York photographer's imprint! On the detailed advertising in labeled verso, the canard of "President Lincoln Reading the Bible to his Son..." is repeated. Actually, the two were thumbing through one of Mathew Brady's sample books when the original photograph was taken. Black bordered, quite pristine. (Est. $150-200)
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1055. Unusual mourning carte with Abe and Mary albumens on embossed board with crossed flags and eagle. Gold-ruled mount has been detailed with heavy, mourning rule. (Est. $100-150)
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A remarkable collection of assassination-related and mourning stereoviews.

1056. A rarity of significance! A fabulous stereoview with titled label on edge of mount with additional example on verso: "Vault with Directors and Guards." Copyright by Schreiber & Glover of Philadelphia, 1865. Flat, brown mount; great detail - note the dignitaries in front of the crypt with an assemblage of guards on the hill above the vault. The first example of this specific photograph to be offered at auction in years! Pristine. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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1057. An apparently unpublished photograph - the Lincoln funeral hearse used in Springfield. Another rare stereoview with titled label on verso: "Views Relating to The Home and Funeral of Abraham Lincoln at Springfield, Ill." Copyright by Schreiber & Glover of Philadelphia, 1865. Flat, brown mount; great detail - note the honor guard posed next to the carriage. The first example of this photo we've seen... in mint condition! (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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1058. Lincoln's parlor at the time of his assassination... the room in which he received many a well-wisher prior to the presidency. A rare stereoview with titled label on edge of mount with additional example on verso: "Parlor of Lincoln." Copyright by Schreiber & Glover of Philadelphia, 1865. Flat, brown mount; great detail - what Mary and Abe chose in the way of decor and artwork to display is prominently visible. Pristine condition, another scarce study. (Est. $800-1,000)
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1059. Similar to preceding image, another Philadelphia stereoview sold by Schreiber & Glover, their label on verso, this showing the hearse mobbed by grieving citizens. A bright, clean example, yellow mount, once again showing a recruiting sign with Maj. Gen. Hancock's likeness in the background. (Est. $500-600)
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1060. Philadelphia stereoview sold by Schreiber & Glover, their label on verso, penciled on verso: "Soldiers holding back the crowds as hearse waited outside Independence Hall in Philadelphia." A great study, some wear/age to yellow mount as shown, a crisp image that includes a recruiting sign with Maj. Gen. Hancock's likeness. (Est. $500-600)
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1061. Stereoview on yellow mount titled "Abraham Lincoln's Catafalque." The gray-clad soldiers of New York's Seventh National Guard regiment, the same regiment that saved the nation's Capital, march along side Lincoln's remains. Except for a little surface age/wear to mount, in very good condition. (Est. $250-350)
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1062. Another great stereoview, this by Ridgway Glover, his 1865 detailed copyright on mount with title "Hearse and Coffin in Philadelphia." Light, even wear, tiny areas of rubbing/loss at corners, quite fine. (Est. $500-600)
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1063. Extremely rare stereoview by Schreiber & Glover of Illinois detailing Lincoln's funeral in downtown Springfield. Printed paper title affixed to verso "Relating to the home and funeral of Abraham Lincoln at Springfield, Ill." View of Springfield square includes the Sangamon County Courthouse with columns decorated in barber-pole bunting with mourners standing in front. Stereoviews of Lincoln's funeral procession in Springfield are difficult to come across - save for a little wear to the brown mount, in very good condition. (Est. $400-500)
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1064. A non-stereo stereoview of the Lincoln funeral procession in New York City, on a green board. Note all of the people watching from the various buildings. Some lightening to photos at bottom and at left and right edges else quite fine. (Est. $100-200)
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1065. Another evocative stereoview of Lincoln's funeral procession in New York City, by E. & H. T. Anthony. On a yellow board, the back has a pasted label from the gallery "The Funeral of President Lincoln, New -York, April 25th, 1865." Very slight color spots at center of image else fine. (Est. $300-500)
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1066. Exceptional stereoview, 1865 Anthony copyright "Negative by Brady & Co.," label on verso: "The Private Box at Ford's Theatre, the place where President Lincoln was assassinated." From the Ostendorf Collection (he paid $275 back in 1987 for this rare stereo). On flat, yellow mount, exceptionally rich with great detail. As fine an example as found. (Est. $800-1,000)
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1067. Another example, similar to preceding, 1865 Anthony copyright "Negative by Brady & Co.," with titled label on verso. This on flat, orange mount, slight rubbing at corners, exceptionally rich with great tone and detail. (Est. $600-800)
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1068. A detailed stereoview by Taylor and Huntington, "Place where President Lincoln was assassinated." On flat, orange mount, exceptionally rich with great detail and contrast, only a hint of foxing that detracts little. Detailed legend on verso with offer for additional photographs. (Est. $400-600)
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1069. Another rare stereoview, 1865 Anthony copyright "Negative by Brady & Co.," with titled label on verso: "The Chair that President Lincoln occupied..." From the Ostendorf Collection (he paid $275 back in 1987 for this rare stereo as well). On flat, orange mount, great tone, detail, contrast. We have never seen this specific photograph... condition like new! (Est. $500-750)
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1070. Another scarce stereoview, 1865 Anthony copyright "Negative by Brady & Co.," titled on verso: "The Chair that President Lincoln occupied..." From the Ostendorf Collection (another he paid $275 for back in 1987). On flat, yellow mount, great tone, contrast. One insignificant ink mark in background... note that Brady propped the rocking chair on two stools to get a nice vantage-point. (Est. $400-600)
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1071. Same as previous lot, this with light, even age and minor wear to mount, titled label on verso with canceled revenue stamp. A fine example. (Est. $200-400)
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1072. Stereoview on flat, orange board simply titled "Ford's Theatre. Washington, D.C." Another specimen from the Ostendorf Collection, a fine view in excellent condition. (Est. $100-200)
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1073. Another fine stereoview of Ford's Theatre by Jarvis of Washington, D.C. Flat, yellow mount, vibrant and clean. A fabulous example! (Est. $100-150)
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1074. One of the best - and scarcest! - stereoviews of "Ford's Theatre, this by Bell & Bro. of Washington, D.C. Hand-titled with printed imprint on verso, another Ostendorf Collection specimen (he paid $275 for this photograph in 1987!). Flat yellow mount, exceptionally clean, a group of visitors are pictured in front of the theatre. (Est. $200-300)
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1075. Another stereoview presenting "Ford's Theatre, where Lincoln was assassinated." Flat tan mount, exceptionally clean. (Est. $60-80)
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1076. Stereoview of the interior of the catacomb and the sarcophagus, located at the National Lincoln Monument, Springfield, IL. Some loss of board and image upper left and lower right corners. Together with a stereoview, on orange board being the entrance to the catacomb at the National Lincoln Monument in Springfield by J.A.W. Pittman of Springfield. Minor discoloration, else fine. A great pair! (Est. $400-500)
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1077. A wonderful mourning stereoview by Anthony, title label on verso "Lincoln Memorial, Dissected Leaves." Lincoln's portrait is affixed to a memorial Crucifix; a classic Victorian tribute. Flat, yellow mount; pristine. (Est. $40-80)
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1078. Incredible, 8x10" 1865 mounted albumen photo of the key that held Lincoln's conspirators in the Old Arsenal Prison. Inscribed across the front in pencil: "Photo of the key that unlocked the prison of Washington D.C. in which the Lincoln conspirators were confined in 1865. And in the courtyard connected with it. The four conspirators Mrs. Surratt, Paine, Herold, Atzerodt." Identical inscription on verso. Front inscription does not detract from this rare and dramatic image... the first example we've encountered. (Est. $400-600)
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1079. Large format albumen "President Lincoln's Hearse - April 22d 1865." A scarce mounted study, a retouched photo by Henzey & Co. of Phildadelphia, on titled board, 10 x 12" overall. Imprint details the name E.S. Earley, Undertaker, who "Designed and Constructed" the hearse itself! Board is evenly toned, a few minor spots detract little. (A similar piece in carte format sold for $660 in 2003.) (Est. $800-1,000)
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1080. A great example of the classic, Victorian, mourning albumen. Larger than most, 5 x 7" mounted on a period board 10 x 13" overall. By Charles Magnus, 1865 and titled "The Martyr of Freedom," these are usually found in smaller formats. A superior specimen and a handsome display. (Est. $100-300)
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The following four lots are brightly hand-colored

1081. And the assassin leaps to the stage! A beautiful, hand-colored magic lantern slide, ca. 1865, with Mary crying out as her husband slumps down in his chair. These graphics were displayed to enthralled audiences in venues across the country, accompanied by dramatic narration and music... all bringing to life, if you will, the death of our president. (Those Victorians were enraptured with the most macabre aspects of life... and death.) Of all the magic lantern slides, the early examples - those set in wooden frames - are among the most treasured. This one is quite scarce. (Est. $300-400)
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1082. Part of the same series of period slides, "The Escape of Booth on Horseback." The assassin flees the back of Ford's Theatre. As with the others, vibrant hand-coloring. (Est. $200-400)
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1083. The "Shooting of Booth" with Garrett's barn set aflame. Atzerodt is shown surrendering as Booth goes down in a "blaze of glory." Great, also very rare. (Est. $200-400)
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1084. Another rare slide: "The Tomb in Springfield and funeral of Lincoln." The entire cortege is pictured with details of the casket being carried into the temporary receiving vault before the final crypt was set. An evocative, touching scene. (Est. $200-400)
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1085. A touching, Victorian tribute to the martyred president - a bas-relief, cameo-styled portrait in a deep, shadowbox frame. We have seen these items in the past... this is one of the larger specimens. 7 x 8 1/2" overall, almost 2" high with glass covering, typical age, cracks and paint loss to plaster frame add to the presentation. (Est. $250-500)
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