AUTOGRAPHS AND MANUSCRIPTS


PART I (Lots 306-386)

CLICK HERE FOR PART II (Lots 387-451)


A rare letter communicating the humanity of Lincoln... taking time to write to an elderly woman whose five grandsons served in the Union Army. A warm missive expressing gratitude for "knitting some 300 pairs of stockings" for the soldiers.

306. LINCOLN, Abraham.
Autograph Letter Signed as President to Mrs. Ester Stockton of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Executive Mansion, Washington, January 8, 1864. One page, quarto, on lined stationery, evenly toned, laid down on heavy card. In full:
"Madam, Learning that you who have passed the eighty-fourth year of life, have given to the soldiers some three hundred pairs of stockings, knitted by yourself, I wish to offer you my thanks. Will you also convey my thanks to those young ladies who have done so much in feeding our soldiers while passing through your City. Yours truly, A. Lincoln."
The widow Stockton's reply to President Lincoln's expression of gratitude is dated August 5th and can now be found in the Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress. Stockton modestly insisted that "my labors in behalf of our gallant soldiers I fear are somewhat exaggerated. I have endeavored to do what I could for those who battle to crush this wicked rebellion. Every grandson I have capable of bearing arms is now in the Army." The elderly correspondent then details all five by their rank and regiment! She added "my earnest prayer for you is, that you may long be spared for the blessing of a grateful nation, when Freedom shall have enthroned herself truly over the entire land. Committing you to the care of our Heavenly Father..." Stockton's account of her five grandsons in the Union army is quite reminiscent of the situation of the widow Bixby of Boston, who reportedly had lost five sons in the service. Lincoln's letter to her, in November 1864, is perhaps the most famous of all his letters, even though John Hay later claimed to have composed it. But, the existence of that missive remains somewhat in doubt - facsimile copies have been reproduced from one of two forgeries since the 1880s. And the real Mrs. Bixby only lost two sons... the others proved to survive with two being deserters.
This evocative letter, published in Basler from a 1917 transcript (Collected Works, vol. 7, p. 117), has remained in the family of the recipient and passed down to each successive generation since it was penned. Ester Stockton was the aged widow of Reverend Joseph Stockton, a Presbyterian minister and principal at the Pittsburgh Academy. A fine letter that resonates with all the qualities of our greatest president. Certainly one of the finer bits of correspondence in private hands.
(Est. $40,000-60,000)
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307. LINCOLN, Abraham. Rare manuscript D.S. "Abraham Lincoln" as President, 1p. 4to., Washington, Mar. 13, 1863, an interim appointment to Lincoln's cabinet: "George Harrington, is hereby appointed to discharge the duties of Secretary of the Treasury, during the absence of Salmon P. Chase, the Secretary". Boldly signed, a slight smudge in the text with a bit of mat burn at extreme margins, overall very good. Such interim cabinet appointments by any president are rarely encountered. (Est. $7,500-8,500)
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Lincoln endorses a note sent for Andrew Johnson... the day before he is re-elected!
308. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Endorsement Signed, 3 x 3 1/2" from Military Governor and soon to be Vice President Andrew Johnson (written by his son as personal assistant and secretary who signs Johnson's name on his behalf), to President Lincoln. Johnson endorses a letter from Edward W. East, Tennessee Secretary of State, asking that a Confederate soldier be allowed a return to his family in Tennessee: "Judge M. Lain Col. Wm. B. Stokes live in the regions of the state the prisoner does and both excellent gentlemen, Col. Stokes commands the 5 Tenn. Cav." The endorsement, 7 x 1 3/4" reads: "Executive Office Nashville, Tenn. Nov. 1st, 1864. Respy. forwarded & recommended for favorable consideration. Andrew Johnson Milt. Gov." Below the endorsement, Lincoln writes in a tight, bold hand: "Let this man take the oath of Dec. 8, 1863 & be discharged. A. Lincoln Nov. 7, 1864." Surrounded by beautiful, ornate frame, 12 x 13". Lincoln's note is written the night before he is re-elected President, handing George McCellan a resounding defeat. Light discoloration at lower left corner, minor smudges. Lincoln's endorsement and signature are quite bold and distinct at the bottom of the document. (Est. $3,000-4,000)
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309. LINCOLN, Abraham. Signed Military Commission. "Know Ye, That reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, fidelity, and abilities of Samuel S Carroll, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, do appoint him First Lieutenant in the tenth Regiment Infantry." Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President and "Simon Cameron" as Secretary of War; September 19, 1861, on vellum, with engravings of eagle and colors and equipment and with blue wafer seal of the War Office. Carroll received brevets for gallant and meritorious service at Chancellorsville, The Wilderness, Gettysburg, and Spottsylvania, rising to the rank of Major General of Volunteers. A fine example for a Gettysburg hero.
(Est. $5,500-7,000)
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The legal writings of Lincoln... a brief in his hand!
310. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Document 7 3/4 x 12", 1 page, March 20, 1850. Document submitted while Lincoln was in partnership with William Herndon. Sworn statement of John B. Thompson affirming that he was present during a land transfer between the "heirs of Payne and the heirs of Hall, was sold to Hall by Gatton, or rather was sold to Mitchell by Gatton..." you get the idea! Blue-lined paper, light feathering on Thompson's signature, in extremely fine condition! A great example of Lincoln's legal prose - despite the most tedious of cases! (Est. $3,200-3,800)
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A great, rare free frank of Abraham Lincoln, addressed in Mary Lincoln's hand with her signature. The letter was most likely sent to the wife of a Confederate Ranger who was to be executed.
311. Legal-sized envelope, two thin tape strips on blank back at top, light typical age. Postal plug-canceled May 17, 1862, Washington, DC. The envelope addressed to a Mrs. John (the name "James" crossed-out and corrected with "John") Spriggs of Springfield, IL was sent by Mary and free franked by President LIncoln in the top right corner. Under his name Priv. Sec. is scratched out. Around that time Captain John S. Spriggs and Captain Marshall Triplett of the Virginia Partisan Rangers guerillas, were being held awaiting trial at Camp Chase, Ohio. The two were to be executed and two Union prisioners had been selected for retaliation. Spriggs and Triplett were being treated like other prisoners of war. (Est. $12,000-14,000)
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312. LINCOLN, Abraham. Very early surname Autograph Signature ("Lincoln"), probably clipped from a ca 1840 legal document; with a printed return address envelope from Menard County circuit clerk and recorder Ross Nance, postmarked Petersburg, Ill., 2 June 1916, sent to Guy Shaw at Beardstown. Nance often gave turn-of-the-century Lincoln enthusiasts autographs from discarded files and correspondence of old Petersburg/New Salem area residents. This example is intriguing because the addressee, a one-term Congressman, is thought to have been related to J. Henry Shaw (1825-1885), Beardstown attorney and orator who helped prosecute the legendary Duff Armstrong murder case. Lincoln won the acquittal of Armstrong - son of his New Salem friends Jack and Hannah Armstrong - partly by using an almanac to discredit the testimony of an eyewitness. Signature fine and clean; envelope uniformly browned on face. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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Politics makes strange bedfellows!
313. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph cover addressed by Lincoln to Hon. Simon Cameron, December 31, 1860. Perhaps this saying was coined to describe the relationship between Abraham Lincoln and Simon Cameron. In any case, it could not have been more appropriate. As many know, Lincoln's managers promised a Cabinet post to Cameron at the Wigwam Convention in Chicago in exchange for votes from the Pennsylvania delegation. This deal, unauthorized by Lincoln, was critical in obtaining the nomination. Despite a directive to "make no promises," Lincoln felt honor-bound to hold up his end of the bargain. Cameron and Edward Bates, another convention also-ran, visited with Lincoln in Springfield on December 31, 1860. The following day, Lincoln gave Cameron a letter confirming that he would be nominated as Sec. of the Treasury or Sec. of War, and seeking Cameron's permission to do so. Three days later, an anxious Lincoln wrote to Cameron "You have not, as yet, signified to me, whether you would accept the appointment; and, with much pain, I now say to you, that you will relieve me from great embarrassment by allowing me to recall the offer." On January 13, 1861, Lincoln wrote again to Cameron, this time asking him to destroy the original January 3rd missive (which Cameron apparently did), sending a replacement letter dated January 3rd which requested Cameron to write "declining the appointment," and apologizing for the first letter. "I learn... that your feelings were wounded by the terms of my letter... I wrote that letter under great anxiety, and perhaps I was not so guarded in its terms as I should have been; but I beg you to be assured, I intended no offense... If I should make a cabinet appointment for Penn. before I reach Washington, I will not do so without consulting you..." In the end, Cameron was appointed Sec. of War, a post he held briefly and ignominiously. We are pleased to offer one of the original envelopes addressed by Lincoln to Cameron that contained one of these historic letters. (The missives now found in the Library of Congress.) Inscribed by Lincoln Hon. Simon Cameron U.S.S. Washington D.C. This is docketed on the front, in Cameron's hand, Lincoln Dec 31.60 Jan. 3 61. The Jan. date is crossed out, probably by Cameron after heeding Lincoln's advice to destroy the letter of that date. Inscription is dark and bold. A small vertical tear extends from the top edge to the "U" in "U. S. S." which it barely touches. Interestingly, the interior of the envelope has three lines of text which, though illegible, likely were offset from Lincoln's letter. (Est. $1,500-1,800)
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Signed "Lincoln & Herndon."

314. HERNDON, William Henry. (1818-91) Lincoln's law partner and biographer. Born in Kentucky, he moved to Springfield in 1823. He met Lincoln when both shared a second-story room with Joshua Speed, a Springfield merchant, in his store. At that time, Herndon was a clerk for Speed. After studying and passing the bar examination in 1844, Herndon joined Lincoln as his partner, a relationship which continued until Lincoln's death. Herndon dedicated the rest of his life to Lincoln's memory researching the martyred President's early years. ADS from the firm of Lincoln and Herndon, January 19, 1858, authorizes the court clerk to serve process in the case of John Calhoun vs. Edward O. Smith and Harriett Smith. Lincoln's law partner signs for both of them. Quite a pretty example. (Est. $800-1,200)
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315. FINE IMPRESSION OF
ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S PRESIDENTIALWAX SEAL. A sharp, clear, full strike of Lincoln's seal (an eagle with arrows and olive branch) in dark maroon wax on plain white card, 3 x 2-1/4 inches. One of a limited number of impressions made about 45 years ago when the ivory-handled seal itself (originally kept by Lincoln's White House guard William H. Crook) was in the famed collection of Justin G. Turner. Uncommon! (OPEN)
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The building that launched a thousand LAWYERS!
316. [LINCOLN/Law] Original plans for building the Sangamon County Courthouse in Springfield, 1825. Complete with three side elevations and floor plan, 4 pages, [1825]. Together with manuscript document detailing costs for construction of Sangamon County Courthouse, 7 1/4 x 10", 1 page, June 7, 1825. Separation at folds, minor foxing, otherwise fine. Wonderful association material with historical significance. [Provenance: ex-Ralph Newman, King Hostick.] (Est. $800-1,200)
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"I go no where..."
Reclusive Mary Lincoln makes dinner plans!


317. LINCOLN, Mary Todd. (1818-82) First Lady. Following the assassination of her husband and death of Tad, her mental health deteriorated to the point where she was committed to a mental institution by her eldest son, Robert. Estranged from Robert she spent the rest of her life in seclusion. Unknown and unpublished Autograph Letter Signed "Mary Lincoln" on monogrammed, black-bordered notesheet, 3pp. inlaid by last leaf, January 23, 1873, n.p. (Chicago), to her close friend and confidant Isaac Arnold. In full: "My son informed me last evening that he has promised to be in St. Louis next Sunday morning to pass that day with his friend John Diller[?]. He will without doubt write his regrets. You have been so kind & good a friend to me, throughout these long & sorrowful years, that although I go nowhere else, I cannot decline your invitation for next Saturday at five. I trust the waiter made the proper excuses to Mrs. & Miss Arnold yesterday morning. I was not up, as I had not closed my eyes the night before. Gratefully, your friend, Mary Lincoln." Light in inking, written with a fine nib, but fully readable. Wonderful content from a woman whose notorious reclusiveness seems to have been challenged by this upcoming affair. Docketed by Arnold on the last page "Mrs. Lincoln Dinner..." One of Lincoln's earliest biographers, an Illinois Congressman and close ally, Arnold involved the President when embroiled in a scandal regarding empty jobs at the Post Office (boy... how little things change!). Arnold, present at Lincoln's deathbed, also helped escort his body back to Springfield. A wonderful missive and rare piece of history. (Est. $3,000-5,000)
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318 LINCOLN, Mary Todd. Free franked envelope, Dec. 14 [n.y.], from Saint Charles, IL, addressed in her hand to "Mrs. Rhoda E. White Grand Central Hotel New York." The writing is in dark pen, an excellent specimen. (Est. $2,000-3,000)
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Among the rarest Lincoln signatures...
the President's father, Thomas.
The great Charles Hamilton speculated
"This volume from the Kentucky frontier is perhaps
the first book Lincoln ever read." A tremendous relic.


319. LINCOLN, Thomas. (1778-1851) Father of Abraham, moved with his family from Virginia to Kentucky in the 1780s, to Indiana in 1816, and to Illinois in 1830. A laborer, farmer, property owner, and accomplished carpenter, Thomas Lincoln was recalled by his son as poorly educated and "never did more in the way of writing than to bunglingly sign his own name." Prohibitively rare signature(s) in a family-owned book, An Alarm to Unconverted Sinners by Joseph Allen. (Samuel Etheridge; Charlestown, 1807.) Signed in three places by Thomas Lincoln, twice in ink and once in pencil, 238pp., leather cover with minor loss on spine and verso, normal wear on pages. This important relic is accompanied by a letter of authentication from the 20th century's greatest manuscript expert and dealer, Charles Hamilton: "I certify that I have carefully examined the volume, `An alarm to Unconverted Sinners' (Charlestown, Mass., 1807), and find that it contains three authentic signatures of Thomas Lincoln, father of Abraham Lincoln. Two of the signatures are in ink and a third is faintly written in pencil. For comparison, a copy of an undisputed signature of Thomas Lincoln is hereunto attached. This book turned up in a collection of books from the library of Hannibal Hamlin, Lincoln's Vice President from Maine. According to most authorities, Thomas Lincoln did not know how to read and `his sole accomplishment in writing was to be able, with painful concentration, to scrawl his name.' (Benj. P. Thomas, Abraham Lincoln, p. 6). It is an odd fact, incidentally, that children, or semi-literate persons, tend to write their names more than once in any book they possess. Lincoln biographer Benj. Thomas also points out that `the Bible was probably the only book the Lincolns owned' (op. cit., p. 16) in their frontier log cabin. If so this Bible has apparently not survived. It is likely that Thomas Lincoln acquired this volume, previously unknown to historians, in trade for services. Although he could not read the book himself, he likely hoped it would be helpful to his children. It seems very probable, considering the date of this book, two years before Abraham Lincoln was born, that the future emancipator may have learned to read from it, since, even if the Lincolns had possessed a Bible, it would have been much more difficult going for a small boy. This volume from the Kentucky frontier is perhaps the first book Lincoln ever read. It may have had a profound influence on the rustic youth who was to become America's greatest president."

A true piece of history... that a young Abe Lincoln may have read this very book and the fact that his father owned this volume is stirring. We were fortunate to sell the only other Thomas Lincoln signature to appear in the market in the past fifty years - that piece, a Signed Legal Document, sold for $12,000 in our auction two years ago. This has even more significance. (Est. $12,000-15,000)
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320. [LINCOLN] Amazingly similar to the signature of a more famous, later namesake! A fine original manuscript document, 4 x 7", listing apothecary supplies sold by Abraham Lincoln of Worcester, MA. (This Abraham Lincoln is a direct relative and namesake to President Abraham Lincoln, from shared lineage of Samuel Lincoln who settled in Hingham, MA. in 1637.) Note his signature is very similar to that of the president! Written on the verso of a note dated 1780 detailing an amount for "Continental Hard money tax." Very clean, a wonderful, early association piece from the family. (Est. $200-500)
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Only a few months after the assassination, Lincoln's son trades duplicate copies of eulogies honoring his father.
A profound - and quite sad - letter.


321. LINCOLN, Robert Todd. (1843-1926) Eldest Lincoln son, the only child to live to adulthood, Secretary of War under President Garfield, President of the Pullman Company. ALS, 2 pp., on black-bordered mourning stationery, Chicago, August 2, 1865, with postal used mourning cover addressed to "Hon. Edwin McPherson, Gettysburg, Penna." The letter reads: "My dear Sir, Yours of July 18th has been received. I regret very much that I have not by me all the sermons, & c. that have been sent, but before leaving Washington, they were packed up, and it is now next to impossible to reach them. As I recollect however, I had recd. few or none from the Northwest and but few since - of all that I can reach, I have only three duplicates and I mailed them yesterday to you, in the hope that they may add to your collection. I regret very much that I can aid you so little and I would be glad to receive any duplicates you can spare. Very Sincerely Yours Robert T. Lincoln." Very fine. One of the best examples you can hope to find as later letters show a reluctance to refer to his father. (Est. $700-900)
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Sec. of War Robert Lincoln recalls being
"a witness of the great Chicago fire"
and orders aid for those in Savannah.


322. LINCOLN, Robert Todd. Manuscript Letter Signed, 3pp., on "War Department, Washington City" letterhead, November 1st, 1883, to Rufus E. Lester, Mayor of Savannah, GA regarding the great Savannah fire in which some 300 homes were destroyed with more than 1,500 people left homeless. Lincoln writes: "Sir: Late last evening, I received a telegram from you saying `A disastrous fire has made homeless many hundreds of people. May we have the use of Oglethorpe Barracks for a few days for sheltering the destitute.' I replied immediately in a telegram addressed to you, `Officer in charge of barracks is ordered by telegram sent herewith to allow unoccupied parts of barracks to be used for shelter of destitute persons designated by you.' I trust that my telegram reached you in time to prevent suffering, for, having been myself a witness of the great Chicago fire in 1871, I can readily understand the necessity for immediate temporary relief to those made homeless by an extensive conflagration. I think it proper to call your attention to the fact that the barracks are advertised to be sold on the 15th instant. I am entirely unacquainted with the extent of the disaster which has taken place, but I trust that the time between now and the day fixed for the sale will be sufficient to enable you to provide for the safety and comfort in other ways of all who under your designation have been able to procure shelter in the barracks. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Robert Lincoln Secretary of War." A beautiful letter. (Est. $500-700)
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323. LINCOLN, Robert Todd. A wonderful framed assemblage featuring a cabinet card of Robert Todd Lincoln by C.M. Bell of Washington, D.C. and a manuscript DS, October 10, 1884, on "War Department, Washington City," letterhead. Signed by Robert Todd Lincoln as Secretary of War to "Messrs. David Bugbee & Co. Booksellers and Stationers, Bangor, Maine." The letter reads: "Gentlemen: Referring to the inquiry contained in your letter of the 25th ultimo, I beg to inform you that the address of Wesley Blake, is Mobile, Alabama. Very respectfully, R.T. Lincoln." The pieces are archivally framed, 20 x 19 1/4" overall, with three separate windows. A really nice presentation. (Est. $400-600)
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324. Carte of Abraham Lincoln II, known as "Jack", the only son of Robert Todd Lincoln. Young Jack had a great interest in the Civil War and was a regular playmate of President Garfield's son. He died at the age of 16 in 1890, a victim of blood poisoning related to a minor surgical operation. Carte taken in 1887, age 14 by Max Platz of Chicago. (From the collection of Lloyd Ostendorf.) Small hole at bottom left corner, mounting remnants on verso, else quite fine. (Est. $400-600)
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We guarantee you won't find another "Lincoln collection" like this!
325. His namesake and great-grandfather may have abhorred liquor... not so this generation! A truly unique group: Lincoln Isham's personal collection of membership cards to various New York speakeasies. Eight (8) cards (one duplicate), including one signed by Isham as a member of the Napoleon Club in midtown Manhattan. Isham (1892-1971) was one of the last direct descendants of the President, the grandson of Robert Todd Lincoln and Mary Harlan. (Two other great-grand children by different lines outlived Isham by a few years... thus concluding the direct blood-line.) Isham lived in Vermont - but clearly must have enjoyed "respites" in New York! (OPEN)
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They cared for Fido when the First Family moved to Washington.
326. An interesting inscribed, printed testimonial from John Linden Roll. A biographical sketch of Roll's friendship with Abraham Lincoln - starting with his father meeting him at Sangamon Town in 1831. Roll's father, a contractor, followed Lincoln to Springfield and worked on the Old State House in Springfield and made repairs to the Lincoln home. Roll later went to Illinois State University with Robert Lincoln. The Roll children were given the Lincoln family dog "Fido" when the First Family departed for Washington. Together with two photographs of Roll, one of which shows him with his collection of Lincoln memorabilia. Both photos show mounting remnants on verso. Fun association! (Est. $300-400)
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Herbert Wells Fay to Grace Bedell...
incredible Lincoln association!

327. FAY, Herbert Wells. (1859-1949) Custodian at the Lincoln Tomb at Oak Ridge Cemetery for 28 years. A remarkable inscription by Fay on the verso of a 4 x 6" silverprint from the Georg Studio with 1894 copyright by Fay in negative - a copy of one of Lincoln's earliest portraits with a beard. This keepsake, sold by Fay to well-wishers, is inscribed to none other than Grace Bedell Billings, who as a little girl wrote Lincoln suggesting that he should grow a beard! "To Grace Bedell Billings. One of the first original photos of Lincoln after you induced him to wear a beard. Taken about 10 days before you saw him. H.W. Fay owner of original negative." At top, he has again signed his name adding "Custodian Lincoln's Tomb July 18, 1922." On October 15, 1860, Bedell, then an eleven-year-old girl, wrote to Lincoln noting that she was not old enough to vote, but "I have got 4 brothers and part of them will vote for you any way and if you will let your whiskers grow I will try and get the rest of them to vote for you. You would look a great deal better for your face is so thin. All the ladies like whiskers..." Lincoln replied to Grace on October 19, "As to the whiskers, having never worn any, do you not think people would call it a piece of silly affection if I were to begin it now?..." Nearly five months later, the fully bearded Lincoln arrived in Westfield, NY where he interrupted a political address to invite his little correspondent up to the platform. There, he kissed Grace and told her he'd taken her advice. Offered together with a 5.5 x 3" photograph of an elderly Grace Bedell Billings (1848-1936) posed with three of her grandchildren. Lincoln photo bears small crease bottom left corner, otherwise very good. Together, two pieces with terrific Lincoln association! (Est. $400-500)
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EARLY ASSOCIATES
[As in past Rail Splitter auctions, we are pleased to offer a wonderful collection of documents and letters from individuals who played an integral role in shaping Lincoln's early interests and pursuits - his close friends, associates in the law, political allies and adversaries.]

The "Long Nine."


Lincoln's colleagues from the Illinois House of Representatives - 1836-38 - so called because of their height, each being over six feet tall. Credited with obtaining the removal of the state capital from Vandalia to Springfield, each remained one of Lincoln's close political and personal friends. Documents signed by the Long Nine are scarce - examples from Dan Stone and Andrew McCormick are particularly rare.

328. [COLLECTION]
ELKINS, William F. ADS as "Justice of the Peace," August 11, 1832, a true copy of a legal document being a receipt for a "large black horse, about fiteen and a half hands high, four years old last spring, long switch tail... a natural trotter..." for forty five dollars. 7 1/2 x 7", some dampstains, not affecting signature. William F. Elkins, (1792-1878) was born in Kentucky and moved to Springfield in 1825. He was appointed by Lincoln register of the land office of Springfield. In 1865, he served as one of Lincoln's funeral pallbearers. DAWSON, John. (1791-1850) Dawson was born in Virginia and settled as farmer in Sangamon County in 1827. He served five terms in the legislature and was a member of the 1847 state constitutional convention. ADS, 7 x 5 1/2", March 5, 1830, an appraisal of a steer at $8 for a citizen of Springfield, John Smith. A clean, bold example. EDWARDS, Ninian. (1809-89) Lincoln's brother-in-law, Ninian Edwards was a son of Illinois' first territorial governor. He married Elizabeth Todd, Mary Todd Lincoln's sister. Ninian served as Illinois state attorney general, state senator, and received a Civil War appointment from Lincoln. Prominent in Springfield politics, Lincoln was married in his home. ADS, 7 3/4 x 4 1/2", one vertical tear lays flat, bold signature. A receipt as partial settlement in a case against James D. Henry. (Lincoln served under Lt. Col. Henry in the Black Hawk War.) FLETCHER, Job. (1793-1872) Fletcher was born in Virginia and moved to Sangamon County in 1819. He spent several terms in the state house and senate. DS, December 7, 1844, 8 x 12", light separation at usual folds, bold and clean. A manuscript-completed, printed Administrator's Bond, also signed by Eddin SWITT and Philip WINEMAN, and signed as witness by Thomas MOFFETT, Lincoln legal associate and Justice. HERNDON, Archer G. (1795-1867) Herndon was the father of Lincoln's law partner, William Herndon. He was born in Virginia and moved to Springfield in 1825. A prominent leader of the Illinois democrats, Herndon was a successful merchant and tavern-keeper, a member of the state legislature, and receiver of the land office in Springfield. DS, May 12, 1830, 7 1/2 x 4 1/2", a promissory note. McCORMICK, Andrew. McCormick was twice a member of the state legislature. A stonecutter by trade, very little is known of his career and he left Sangamon County at an early date. His signature is exceptionally rare - only a few examples are known. DS, 6 1/2 x 3", September 5, 1832. A receipt for the payment of $33.25 from a William Henderson. STONE, Daniel. Born in Vermont, Stone moved to Springfield in 1833. As a member of the legislature, Stone and Lincoln entered a protest against a series of pro-slavery resolutions -- considered among Lincoln's earliest and most important statements on the subject. Stone became a circuit court judge in Galena. He left Illinois for New Jersey and died in 1845. DS "D. Stone, Depty. Attny.", 7 1/2 x 12", April, 1834, requesting that subpoenas be issued on behalf of the Circuit Court naming a dozen individuals involved in the Lincoln story - including members of the Berry and Clary families. A clean, bold specimen. WILSON, Robert Lang. (1805-1880) Wilson was born in Pennsylvania and moved to Athens, Illinois in 1833. A lawyer, Wilson was a member of the legislature and later circuit clerk in Whiteside County, Illinois. He was a probate judge who raised troops in Illinois during the Civil War, and was made a paymaster by Lincoln. Marriage certificate Signed on verso, 7 3/4" x 5", January 16, 1838. Also signed by Charles R. Matheny. Overall, a fine collection! (Est. $1,500-3,000)

He shared a room with Lincoln, described him as a "green horn," and provided William Herndon with much of what is known on the great man's early life... an extremely rare autograph.

329. CARMAN, Caleb. (1805-88) Old New Salem friend of Lincoln with whom Lincoln boarded during his early years in Sangamon Town in the 1830s. Carman provided many of the early anecdotes of Lincoln's early life in Herndon's The Life of Lincoln. Extremely rare Autograph Letter Signed, the only example known to us, 5 x 8", Petersburg, July 30, 1888 to an unnamed correspondent shortly before his death noting an "...inclosed [sic] picture of my self you can put on the Picture your Self I was born 1805 11 of March..." Ink slightly smudged, otherwise very good. This rare missive was found in the retained papers of Osborn Oldroyd. (See additional items later in this catalog.) (OPEN)
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330. CONKLING, James Cook. (1816-99) Came to Springfield in 1838 and developed a close personal and professional relationship with Lincoln. He served on the Republican State Central Committee and was a presidential elector in 1860 and 1864. Through Conkling, Lincoln defended his positions on emancipation and the use of Blacks in the military - all articulated through a letter to Conkling that was read before a Springfield Union meeting. During the broken engagement with Mary Todd, Conkling wrote Mercy Levering that after a week in the sick room Lincoln "is reduced and emaciated in appearance and seems scarcely to possess strength enough to speak above a whisper. This case at present is truly deplorable." Mary Todd and Mrs. Conkling were good Springfield friends. ADS (completely in the hand of Conkling), 7 1/2 x 3 1/2, from Springfield, August 6, 1841, a receipt from George Davis (fellow Springfield attorney). On this date, Lincoln is in Sangamon Circuit Court. Quite fine. Together with BUNN, Jacob. Bunn was a successful merchant and banker in Springfield and personal friend of Lincoln. In 1859, Bunn advanced Lincoln $400 for the purchase of the Illinois State Staats-Anzeiger, a German newspaper, published in Springfield which Lincoln later resold for the same price he paid for it. Jacob Bunn would later perform valuable financial services and advise for Mary Todd Lincoln for which she expressed gratitude in their numerous letters. ADS (completely in Bunn's hand), 5 x 2', receipt paid in full on account, dated January 1, 1850. Quite good. Two (2) fine items. (Est. $100-200)
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331. DUNCAN, Joseph. (1794-1844) Early political opponent who later became a close political friend of Lincoln, Governor of Illinois 1834-8. Duncan commanded forces with distinction in the War of 1812 and was awarded a "testimonial sword" by Congress for heroism. He served in Congress as a Jackson Democrat only to later switch parties to become a Whig. It was during his tenure as Governor that Lincoln successfuly orchestrated the removal of the Capital to Springfield. Handsome land grant signed as Governor, 15 1/2 x 12 1/2", July 1, 1835. A choice example, usual folds, quite fine. Also signed by A.P. Field as Sec. of State, a man Lincoln helped throw out of office in a fight over party politics. Scarce. (Est. $150-200)
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332. [Group] A fine collection of early Lincoln associates and friends. GENTRY, Allen. ADS, check signed and in the hand of Allen Gentry, written from Rockport, Indiana, 1861. Boyhood friend of Lincoln's from Indiana. Son of James Gentry who ran the store in the village of Gentryville, about a mile and half from where the Lincolns lived. Lincoln helped out at the store. Allen Gentry and Lincoln took a flatboat of cargo for James Gentry to New Orleans at a wage of $8.00 a month. They made frequent stops to trade at the sugar plantations along the river; "were attacked by seven negroes with the intent to kill and rob them," remembered Lincoln. In New Orleans Lincoln encountered large numbers of slaves. Small tear and fold at bottom left, otherwise fine. Together with, REGNIER, Francis. One of two doctors who resided in New Salem and later Petersburg. In New Salem, Dr. Regnier's office was located between Martin Waddell's house and Sam Hill's carding machine. ADS, 2 1/2 x 7 1/2', in Regniers hand, a receipt for "...Jan 8, 1850 for medical services in last illness $5.00." Quite good. In addition, Legal DS by GREEN, Bowling. Green was Justice of the Peace in New Salem. Lincoln was a constant visitor to his home when studying law. He is said to have found comfort at the time of Ann Rutledge's death from "his old friend Bowling Green, also lived about a mile south of New Salem." (Donald) Lincoln regularly attended Bowling Green's court. Green was the one who suggested that Lincoln run for the state legislature in 1832. Green died on February 13, 1842. At his funeral Mrs. Green requested that Lincoln say something. Accounts of what he said are conflicting, some stating that his remarks were beautiful, others that he was choked with emotion. Three (3) fine items. (Est. $300-500)
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333. [KENTUCKY/Lincoln Postal History] HAYCRAFT, Samuel. (1795-1878), Elizabethtown, Kentucky native, local historian, Unionist; as a boy knew Thomas Lincoln, Abraham's father; carried on an extensive, friendly correspondence with the President-to-be in 1860; Lincoln assured Haycraft "I very well know who you are - so well I recognized your handwriting", but to Haycraft's suggestion that he visit his old Kentucky home Lincoln asked, perhaps not wholly in jest, if he might not be "lynched". Partly printed summons filled out and signed by Haycraft as clerk of the Hardin Circuit Court, ordering two men to appear under penalty of 100 pounds (not dollars!) each, 1 page, oblong 8vo, 15 Feb. 1844, addressed on verso to the Nelson County Sheriff, Bardstown, with fine blue Elizabethtown postmark. Light old folds; very good. Plus: ALS of J.F. Cessna, Hodgenville (Ky.), 26 Jan. 1844, to James Wright, Bardstown, stating he could not serve a man "who lives out of Larue county...on Nolynn in Hardin County"; addressed overleaf with manuscript "Hodgenville / Jany 30" postmark in deep blue ink. Folds worn and a bit rough, but a very rare vintage postmark from Lincoln's "birthplace", and mentioning Nolin Creek, on which his family also once lived. (Est. $60-80)
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334. HEAD, Jesse. Justice of the Peace and minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington County, Kentucky, where he owned property and slaves. On June 1, 1806, he married Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, parents of Abraham Lincoln. ADS, 1 p., 6 x 5'. Six lines in the hand of Jesse Head as "Justice for Washington County" for an oath given before him, 1800. Normal wear. (Est. $75-100)
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335. HERNDON, William H. (1818-91) Abraham Lincoln's law partner and biographer. ADS, signed "Herndon & Zane" as attorney for the complainant, 3 1/2 pp., August 15, 1861, small folio, to the Judge of the Sangamon Circuit Court. Original legal brief in the case of King vs. Barrett, a dispute over a land transaction. When Lincoln went into the White House, Herndon entered an informal partnership with Charles S. Zane, who, like Herndon, was a radical Republican. Very fine condition. (Est. $400-500)
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"I want it to defend Lincoln's memory." Nine months after the assassination, Lincoln's former law partner assumes
his new responsibility -
as biographer and defender.
336. HERNDON, William H. ALS, Springfield, January 22, 1866. He writes: "Friend Hall -- Will you have the kindness to copy Mr. Lincoln's bond to Johnston or your father, which I saw when I was down to see you. Copy every word - figure, and name carefully from top to bottom, and send to me, if you please. Don't fail. I want it to defend Lincoln's memory. Please write to me at any time you may think of any thing that is good or bad of Mr. Lincoln, truthfully just as it happened and took place. Were any of your boys applicants for any office made to Mr. Lincoln while he was President? Hall -- what is your honest opinion -- come honest opinion -- in reference to Mr. Lincoln's love for his kin and relations generally. Please -- friend -- accommodate me. Your Friend W. H. Herndon." A fabulous Herndon letter articulating his new drive... to chronicle every aspect of Lincoln's life and paint him with the honesty he deserved. John Hall was Lincoln's step-nephew (his father, Squire Hall, was married to Matilda, daughter of Sarah Lincoln). One light vertical fold and mounting remnants at edge where once tipped into a book, 8 x 10", as fine a Herndon letter as you can hope to find. (Est. $1,500-2,500)
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An early Lincoln law associate's certificate to practice law... signed by two other
early Lincoln law associates.

337. LOCKWOOD, Samuel D. and BROWNE, Thomas C. ADS, 2pp., October 12, 1839. This document certifies John Chapman to practice law in the state of Illinois; signed by Samuel D. Lockwood and Thomas C. Browne, both associated with Lincoln's legal career and members of the State Supreme Court. Lockwood was also an Illinois Attorney General. Browne ran unsuccessfully for Governor before he was on the court and attended Abe's wedding to Mary Todd. Very fine. Quite scarce, early signatures. (Est. $200-400)
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338. McNAMAR, John. (1801-79) McNamar, using the alias McNeil, was one of the first merchants at New Salem. He sold the business in 1832 and returned to New York with the intention of bringing his parents to Illinois. McNamar and Ann Rutledge were engaged to be married, but in part because of his long delay in returning, Rutledge became engaged to Lincoln. While living with her parents on a farm owned by McNamar, Ann died, shortly before McNamar returned from the East. At the time of this document he was serving as Menard County Assessor. ADS (all in McNamar's hand) legal paper dealing with "List of lands known to have been twice assessed for the year 1842." Petersburg, June 19, 1843. Excellent condition, rare. (Est. $75-100)
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One of the last Lincolns
in the direct blood-line.


339. RANDOLPH, Jessie Lincoln Beckwith Johnson. (1875-1948) Daughter of Robert Todd Lincoln. ADS (a check) signed "J. L. Randolph" on Riggs National Bank, Washington, April 27, 1927. Jessie was the third child of Robert and Mary. She was married three times. Fine. (Est. $50-100)
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340. RUTLEDGE, David H. ADS, October 21, 1841, in the Menard Circuit Court matter of Jacob Bale vs. William Bennett. Bale was a resident at New Salem. By this time in 1841, he owned much of the land that once held New Salem including the Rutledge Tavern and the old mill. Bennet ran the hotel in Petersburg. Rutledge, the brother of Ann Rutledge, lived only a short time after this document was signed. Fine. (Est. $300-400)
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341. [RUTLEDGE] Manuscript inventory of the goods, chattels and personal property from the estate of D.H. Rutledge, signed by appraisers Bennet Day, W.G. Spears and John McNeal. Folio document, Menard County, Ill., 11 June 1842. David Ham Rutledge, a younger brother of Ann Rutledge, served in Abraham Lincoln's company during the Black Hawk War and was once his co-defendant in a lawsuit (although not yet of legal age, Rutledge had signed a land conveyance bond on which Lincoln went surety; the parties settled and the suit was dismissed). Rutledge became the first practicing attorney in Menard County and as such was involved in a few suits with Lincoln, but his very successful career was cut short by death when he was less than 30 years of age. This document shows that he left personal property valued at just under $70, including two cows, a bull calf, flour, meat, a "furkin of laird", etc.; among his various household items those shown as most valuable were his "stove firnature & pipe" ($15), clock ($5), "bed, polster & under bed" ($12) and "bead stead.'" (Est. $200-400)
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342. STUART, John Todd. (1807-85) Illinois legislator, Congressman, cousin of Mary Todd, Stuart was Lincoln's first law partner (1837-41) and his early mentor. They met during service together in the Black Hawk War. Stuart loaned the budding lawyer his first law books. An "old-line" Whig, Stuart opposed the Republican Party and Lincoln's administration, primarily because of emancipation policies. Pair of Autograph Legal Documents Signed "Stuart & Dummer," concerning New Salem resident Nelson Alley, quoting a promissory note signed by Abraham Lincoln; in all 5 pages, 4to, reinforced at folds by silking, prepared for the November 1834 special term of the Sangamon County (Illinois) Circuit Court. Henry E. Dummer, preceded Lincoln as the law partner of John Todd Stuart; Lincoln studied informally under Stuart & Dummer and borrowed lawbooks from them until his own admission to the bar in 1836. One document, signed "Stuart & Dummer p.q.", is a complaint in which Springfield merchants James Bell and Seth Tinsley seek damages from Alley for failing to meet a $453.84 promissory note of 6 May 1833 which was secured by "a conditional deed to Salem town lot" and other acreage. The text incorporates a copy of Alley's note which was endorsed with two credits, one by "Constant, Allen & Lincoln's note for $50...Springfield Sept. 21st 1833." The second document describes Alley's mortgaged acreage and the "town lot in New Salem...measuring 65 ft. front...with all its appurtenances" and asks the sheriff to summon Alley to show cause why judgment should not be rendered against him and the properties sold to satisfy such judgment. Nelson Alley briefly owned the New Salem tavern where Lincoln occasionally boarded. In October 1832 they jointly signed a note for Vincent Bogue (the steamboat captain who dreamed of linking the Sangamon into the Mississippi and Ohio river trade) and were subsequently sued on it. Alley was one of the sureties who guaranteed Lincoln's bond when he was appointed postmaster of New Salem in May 1833, and that same year they were among the petitioners for construction of a road from Petersburg towards Beardstown. On 1 March 1834 both took part in a convention called to name a candidate for Governor of Illinois, but following this Alley's name fades from the Lincoln record. The complainants in this case were also Lincoln associates: Lincoln eventually moved his law offices into Tinsley's store building on the Statehouse square, while James Bell went into business with Lincoln's intimate friend Joshua F. Speed. Both of these documents are signed by Charles R. Matheny (1786-1839), Methodist preacher and Springfield pioneer who held many Sangamon county offices and was a leader of the town's colonization society. His son James H. Matheny, a good friend of Lincoln (and "best man" at his wedding to Mary Todd) testified that his father considered Lincoln an "infidel" and "with all his soul hated to vote for him" for the state legislature. Contemporary material referring to New Salem is rare, much more so when it mentions Lincoln. (Est. $800-1,200)
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He authored one of Lincoln's first campaign biographies... the only one to which Lincoln himself made corrections. "No admirer, who speaks in his praise must pause to conceal a stain upon his good name." The ONLY known holographic excerpt from the Life of Lincoln.
343. HOWELLS, William Dean. (1837-1920) Journalist, novelist, poet and biographer. He wrote the first, true campaign biography of 1860, The Lives and Speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin. (See: The Rail Splitter, Winter 2001, for details). Howells also penned well-received, 19th century novels (The Rise of Silas Lapham, 1885) and was considered one of the great editors/critics of his day. Autograph Quotation Signed, 5.5 x 8.25" on custom sheet prepared by Osborn Oldroyd for his monumental 1882 work The Lincoln Memorial: Album-Immortelles. (See later in this catalog for additional Oldroyd material.) Howells pens a moving sentiment on the stationery provided for the compilation - Lincoln profile at top; the tomb pictured on verso. "No admirer who speaks in his praise must pause to conceal a stain upon his good name. No true man falters in his affection at the remembrance of any mean action or littleness in the life of Lincoln. The purity of his reputation ennobles every incident of his career and gives significance to all the events of his past." W.D. Howells, Belmont, MA, 1880. This represents the only such manuscript by Howells extant; published on page 407 the Immortelles. A wonderful Lincoln treasure. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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AUTOGRAPHS - POLITICAL & SOCIAL

John Bell and his wife pen a poem. Scarce prose from the man who ran against Abe!


344. BELL, John. (1797-1869) Speaker of the House of Representatives (1834-5), Senator from Tennessee (1847-59) who also served as William Henry Harrison's Secretary of War. Bell ran on the Constitutional Union ticket in 1860 helping split the Democratic vote assuring Lincoln's victory. Scarce A.Ms.S. "Jno. Bell" 3pp. 6 x 8", Washington, June 19, 1836, a poem, the first half of which is in the hand of his wife and entitled "Field Flowers." Bell writes in part: "O, what sad train of thought and feeling, / So unlike all that's gay and pleasing, / Stealing oe'r my own fair one's bosom / Was that which could, in dire discordance / with youthful hope and nature's ordinance / convert the beauteous, smiling flower / that only blooms to banish sorrow / Into memento of parting hour..." He ends the poem noting that it is an "Emblem of joy to our friend Miss M." Bell manuscript material is difficult to obtain, especially in the case of autograph letters and manuscripts like these. Very lightly toned, a couple of minor splits, binding remnants at left margins, otherwise mostly clean and boldly penned. (Est. $400-500)
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Lincoln's former bodyguard writes a
biography that is "questioned" by his law partner. Ward Lamon is challenged for questionable accuracy!


345. BLACK, Jeremiah S. (1810-83) U.S. Attorney General in President Buchanan's cabinet 1857-60; Sec. of State, Dec. 1860-March 1861; during the secession crisis, was of the opinion that it was the duty of the government to put down insurrection & that the Constitution contained no provisions for secession; retired from public life upon the inauguration of Lincoln. ALS, New York, June 4, 1872, from Black to Col. Donn Piatt, (1819-91), Union officer in the Civil War (volunteered as a private, was promoted to captain and became Adjutant General on the staff of General Robert Schenck, saw duty at Bull Run, Cross Keys & Bull Pasture Mountains). Piatt was the founder & editor of the weekly Capital in Washington, D.C., a journal that exposed weakness & corruption of both Democrats & Republicans. During the presidential campaign of 1876, he was indicted for "inspiring insurrection." Excellent content complaining of being misquoted & warning about the credibility of the book by Lincoln's former "bodyguard", Ward Hill Lamon. Lamon was Black's law partner at this time & his book Life of Abraham Lincoln was actually written by Black's son, Chauncey F. Black. The bio was based chiefly on material which Lamon obtained (purchased!) from William H. Herndon. Black writes in part: "My Dear Sir, Returning from the West this morning, I found your letter in the Tribune. You are the greatest man alive when you express your own sentiments, but you miss it a little when you go for mine. If I reply it will be for your paper and after a fair talk. I will see you some time before long. I wish you would not say anything about Lamon's Life of Lincoln until you learn the inside history of it. It is not the book that was written. The falsification of the text, the additions and suppressions are a big swindle. Yours truly J.S. Black" Includes Piatt's docketing on back. A fascinating piece of Lincoln history. (Est. $200-400)
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A signed, special printing: Conant's encounters with Abraham Lincoln.
346. CONANT, Alban Jasper. (1821-1915) Conant, an artist, author, correspondent, and founder of the School of Mines and Metallurgy, is best known for his portraits of Lincoln, Sherman, Anderson at Sumter, judges of the Supreme Court, and various social and business leaders of the day. Printed Manuscript Signed, leaves (pages 167-184) from Liber Scriptorum (Authors Club, New York: 1893).This is an eighteen-page offprint on heavy rag. Conant's essay is entitled "My Acquaintance with Abraham Lincoln." Conant first met Lincoln at an 1860 political convention and five years later accompanied the procession that returned the martyred President to Springfield. An excellent work, most certainly printed for the author to use as a presentation copy, boldly signed in full on the final page. Excellent - and certainly rare. (Est. $150-200)
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One of David Davis'
last legal briefs in Springfield.


347. DAVIS, David. (1813-86). Supreme Court Justice appointed to the Bench in 1862 by his grateful friend, President Lincoln. The two first met in 1835 while traveling the law circuit. Nine years later, Davis would write of his friend "Lincoln is the best stump speaker in the state." Davis became Lincoln's political strategist and de-facto campaign manager securing his 1860 nomination by rallying Lincoln forces at the Chicago convention. After the President's assassination, Davis acted as executor of his estate. He served on the Bench for fifteen years (1862-77) and, following a failed attempt to secure the Liberal Republican nomination for president in 1872, served seven years in the Senate. Autograph Legal Document Signed, 2pp., December 4, 1860. A brief filed in the matter of Matthews & Adams, et. al., vs. Moses Walker. This must represent one of Davis's last cases in Springfield before leaving for Washington. Just two months after this document was written, Davis joined the President-elect on the trip East. Extremely fine, minor separation at folds, docketed, bold "D. Davis" signature. Just about as fine an example as you could hope to find. (Est. $300-500)
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AN UNPUBLISHED, UNRECORDED JEFFERSON DAVIS LETTER
- WRITTEN ON ELECTIONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1860.

348. DAVIS, Jefferson. (1808-89) President of the Confederate States of America. Pierce's Secretary of War and a Mississippi Senator, he left Congress after secession. He was elected President of the CSA, and circumstances made him more autocratic as the war progressed. After the war, he was captured and imprisoned for two years. Never tried for treason, he was released and wrote The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. A fantastic ALS, 2pp., light edge burns from old mat, evenly toned, minor chips, three small holes/separation at usual folds, minor smudges and very light dampstain at one corner all detract little. 8 x 9.5" with a large, bold signature and clean, legible handwriting. Written to Henry Brown Cozzens (1830-77), head of the Young Men's Democratic Association of Natchez, November 6, 1860, from "Brierfield," Davis's Mississippi plantation. In full:
"My dear Sir, I sincerely regretted my inability to accept your kind invitation to address the young men's democratic association of Natchez on the evening of the 5th Inst. The labor I had undergone when I arrived at Vicksburg on the 3d and received your letter had inflamed my throat so as positively to require rest and you will appreciate my anxiety to be at the box of my own precinct on the election day, which could only be done by considerable fatigue and exposure, if a chance boat should indeed render it possible. Under these circumstances the dispatch which I hope you received in due time was dictated. For many reasons it would have been particularly gratifying to me to have been heard by your association, like St. Paul to have been permitted to answer for myself as well as to place before the opposition the cause of their own safety as involved in the defense of our common rights, which it requires united action to secure by peaceable means. Thanking you for your consideration. I am very respectfully and truly your's, Jeffn. Davis."
We believe that Davis most assuredly voted for the Breckinridge and Lane ticket - Southern Democrats - on this date. Few remember, however, that the future President of the Confederacy was frequently considered as a democratic candidate for the presidency himself. In fact, he received quite a few votes in the convention of 1860. In the Senate that year, Davis helped sponsor numerous bills in an effort to avoid the pending secession crisis. But, in his speech of December 10, 1860, he carefully distinguished between independence, which the states had achieved at great cost, and the Union, which had cost "little time, little money, and no blood," taking his old state rights position. On January 10, 1861, Davis made another speech on the state of the country - asserting the right of secession, denying that of coercion, and urging the withdrawal of the garrison from Fort Sumter. Mississippi had seceded the previous day... but it was not until the 24th that Davis was officially informed. At that time, he withdrew from the Senate and returned home. Before his arrival, he was appointed by the Secession Convention Commander-in-Chief of the Army of Mississippi, with the rank of major general. On February 18th, he became President of the Confederate States of America. The rest, as they say, is all history! And... in some small way... it all started with this letter! A fun find that has remained in the original recipient's family all these years.
(Est. $4,000-8,000)
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Rare war date ALS of Jefferson Davis.
With the fall of Richmond imminent, he reminisces about a "Senate debate."
349. DAVIS, Jefferson. ALS, November 25 1864, on plain beige paper with a fleur-de-lis embossed in the upper left corner, reads: "My dear Sir, I sincerely thank you for the document sent this day. It has to me the special value you suppose, and I do not know whether more to admire the kindness which has secured me this attention or the order which after so long an interval enables you to hand me an unbound document with the marks for reference as I placed them when engaged in a Senate debate, years ago. Very truly yours (signed) Jefferson Davis". The addressee is "Gen'l W. Patton". A fine example. (Est. $3,000-4,000)
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350. DAVIS, Jefferson. A superb small archive of material relating to the proposed withdrawal of funding of the American arsenal at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, including a Davis A.L.S. and L.S., with three A.L.S.'s from Congressman Chalres James FAULKNER (1806-1884) who helped write the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and incredibly would serve on Stonewall Jackson's staff when Jackson's army surrounded and captured the 12,500-man Union garrison at Harpers Ferry in 1862! In chronological order, the first letter was written by Faulkner, then representing the Harpers Ferry district, to Davis, then serving as Secretary of War, 1p. 4to., Washington, Aug. 27, 1856 expressing his worry about rumors circulating that the War Department would: "stop further operations at the National Armory". Davis replies in an A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo., [Washington] Aug. 27, 1856: "...Instructions have been given not to continue any work at the armories or arsenals for which there are not available means. This will not stop the manufacture of arms immediately but the appropriation for improvements and repairs at the armories will serve for a short time longer to continue the last mentioned operations. It is a disagreeable and injurious necessity and I sincerely sympathise...". The next day, Faulkner pens an initialed A.L.S. 1p. 4to. from Washington enclosing a copy of a letter he has that day sent to President Franklin Pierce (included in this lot) in which Faulkner pleads that many of his constituents will become unemployed, strongly making his points, and urging that the government seek to borrow the necessary funds to continue operations at the arsenals and armories. On September 1st, Davis replies to Faulkner with a manuscript L.S. 1p. 4to., War Dept., Washington, acknowledging the President's receipt of Faulkner's letter and summarizing its contents. . He adds: "...your letter has been returned by the President to this department with the following endorsement thereon: 'I return herewith the letter of Mr. Faulkner...covered by a note to you of the same date. The Army appropriation bill having passed and having received my approval to-day, it is unnecessary to decide the question presented..." A terrific archive. (Est. $4,000-5,000)
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Davis pens a war-dated note to Texas Confederate Senator Louis Trezevant Wigfall.
351. DAVIS, Jefferson. ANS, September 11, 1862, addressed to Texas Confederate Senator Louis Trezevant Wigfall. The note expresses his wish to see Wigfall: "Dear Sir, when your convenience will permit please let me see you. Your Friend Jeffn. Davis" Davis's desire to meet with Wigfall is interesting because the Senator had been opposed to many of his policies since early in the war. There had been opposition to Davis since his election the previous spring, but in early fall of 1862 the Confederacy's situation looked a little bit brighter. Perhaps Davis thought that this was the moment to win Wigfall over to his side. Wigfall had been a U.S. Senator, resigning from that body in time to visit Fort Sumter at the end of the bombardment to ask for the Union surrender. He served as a Brigadier General, C.S.A., from October 1861 until the following February, when he resigned to take the Confederate Senate seat. Throughout the war, his opposition to Davis never seemed to waver. Fine condition. A fantastic example. (Est. $2,000-2,500)
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Democrats Say:
"Let Bygones be Bygones!"


352. [DAVIS, Jefferson] Debate on Pensioning Jeff. Davis, Condensed from the Proceedings of the U. S. Senate, March 3, 1879. An 8-page Republican pamphlet describing how the motion to deny Jeff Davis a veterans' pension - based on and due from his service in the Mexican War - was defeated along strict party lines. All the Republicans voted for denial of benefits, all the Democrats voted for giving same. A scarce imprint, minor light age, one tiny tear lays flat, else quite fine. (Est. $75-100)
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353. DOUGLAS, Stephen Arnold. (1813-61) Northern Democratic candidate for President in 1860, Illinois Senator, Representative. Lincoln's great political adversary was considered one of the great orators of his time. The "Little Giant" defeated Lincoln for the Senate in 1858 following a series of public debates, but later supported the President in the early days of his Administration. He was acting on Lincoln's advice to rally support in the Northwest, delivering a speech in Springfield, when he was stricken with typhoid and died. Fine content ALS, July 21, 1857, a recommendation for a "Mr. Howard in place of Mr. Gray as Post Master - I know Mr. Howard well as one of the truest Democrats in Northern Illinois and esteem him a personal friend..." Usual folds, integral blank leaf intact, quite fine. A clean example to represent the Little Giant! (Est. $300-400)
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354. DOUGLAS, Stephen Arnold. Autographe Legal Document Signed, 7 3/4 x 12 3/4" entirely in Douglas' hand, docketed on verso. Written for a Green County Circuit Court empanelled grand jury for the September term of 1835. This particular case is Alfred Baker v. John Evans, where the grand jury found that Evans assaulted Baker with "a club of the length of two feet." Douglas signs as State Attorney. Minor foxing, else quite a fine example. (Est. $300-500)
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Attending a "Debates" reunion. Scarce letters from the "Little Giant's" wife and son.


355. DOUGLAS, Adele Cutts. Stephen Douglas' first wife, Martha Martin, was twenty-two years old when they married in 1847. She died in 1853. In 1856 Douglas remarried, taking as his bride twenty-year-old Adele Cutts. Scarce ALS, "Addie Douglas," April 19,1865, to a Mr. Risling on her intialed letterhead. She writes on friends and personal matters regarding an appointment just four days after Lincoln's assassination. Soiled and wrinkled along one vertical band at right, otherwise fine. Together with a lovely CDV of Mrs. Douglas. Also; DOUGLAS, Stephen Arnold. Born of Stephen and his first wife, Martha, on November 3, 1850 in Brandon, VT, the sixth Stephen Arnold Douglas in the family lineage. He was a Chicago lawyer and political orator. TLS, August 20, 1908, Chicago, to Benjamin S. Cable on Douglas's Chicago law office stationery. He writes: "My Dear Sir: I desire to thank you most sincerely for the favor of the transportation just brought me from you by Mr. Peck, - Chicago to Ottawa and return for myself and wife to attend the Lincoln-Douglas Debates Reunion to be held there tomorrow, and I further beg leave to assure you that I most heartily appreciate your kindness." Pin hole in upper corner, otherwise quite fine. A nice group. (Est. $300-400)
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356. And... to go with the previous lot... a vivid carte of Mrs. Stephen A. Douglas in black mourning dress. Photo by Fredricks of New York, 1862. Pretty. (Est. $75-100)
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357. EVERETT, Edward. (1794-1865) Vice-Presidential candidate with John Bell on the Constitutional Union ticket against Lincoln in 1860, Secretary of State, Massachusetts Senator, Governor. Everett shared the platform with Lincoln at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863.Autograph Letter Signed, 2pp., December 16, 1862, Boston, sending autographs to a collector. In part: "...I also send you...the manuscript of a short speech made by me in Fanueil Hall last summer...I also enclose an autograph of Genl McClellan..." (Not present.) A clean, fun specimen. (Est. $100-150)
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Edward Everett appeals to get a
"valuable" astronomer released from the Army... for a safer job in the Navy!

358. EVERETT, Edward. A great Civil War ALS, 3pp., Boston, MA, November 19, 1862, to Asst. Sec. of the Navy Gustavus Fox. In part: "The friends of Mr. H.P. Tuttle are desirous of obtaining for him the place of assistant paymaster in the Navy. This young gentleman, 24 years of age, has lately been connected with the Observatory at Cambridge, where he has made himself an enviable scientific reputation. Patriotic motives led him, a few months since, to enlist as a common soldier, & he is now in the army in N. Carolina. It is feared that his physique will sink under the hardships & exposures of the field...his life is too valuable to be unnecessarily sacrificed...I should be gratified if you would speak to the Secretary in his favor..." Horace Parnell Tuttle (1839-1923) is credited with the discovery of numerous comets, meteor showers, and asteroids - at least four periodic comets bear his name. Among other accomplishments, he devised the system for transmitting Morse Code via signal lanterns. We know Everett's efforts in this appeal paid off. Tuttle, who mustered into Co. D, MA 44th Infantry in 1862, was discharged for promotion the following year and entered the Navy. (Est. $150-250)
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American Journalist, founder of New York Tribune, 1872 presidential candidate, Horace Greeley - an ALS to the great John Calhoun.
359. GREELEY, Horace. (1811-72) Democratic presidential candidate 1872, leading publisher and editor. In 1841, Greeley established The New York Tribune, which came to exemplify the highest standards of journalism. A reformer, he opposed slavery, supported free homesteading, advocated the organization of labor and, following the Civil War, favored total amnesty for former rebels. During the war, considered somewhat hostile to Lincoln's prosecution of the war and was accused of having "Copperhead" sympathies. He came to support the President's administration and grieved deeply at his murder. (See later in this catalog for a fabulous ticket to hear the publisher/orator speak at a Black church on the martyred President.) Fine content ALS regarding political speech and political issues during the election of 1844. Greeley pens this letter to Senator John C. Calhoun on March 18, 1844 regarding a speaking engagement on political issues in the upcoming Presidential campaign of 1844. Greeley declines the invitation to speak in Connecticut to his Wifes illness. It reads in part: "I learn from Mr. Bacon that you would like to hear me make a plain talk on the Tariff in Plymouth before the election. I very much regret that the illness of my Wife will prevent my accepting your kind offer." He then adds "Hoping that I shall be able to do you some good through the Tribune, and with a lively trust that the result in your state will be auspicious." A neatly penned letter, excellent. (Est. $300-500)
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Greeley sets the record straight...
the Governor of Rhode Island
DID NOT vote for Lincoln!
360. GREELEY, Horace. (1811-72) American journalist, reformer, and political force; opponent of slavery; founder of the New York Tribune, Liberal Republican and Democratic candidate for President in 1872. ALS, written on an autograph letter received from Albert S. Paxson of Buckingham, PA of 3/10/1862, in response to his request for information on Governor Sprague of Rhode Island and the 1860 election that put Lincoln in the White House. Greeley responds: "My Dear Sir: I understand that Gov. Sprague did not vote at all for President in 1860. I think he would have preferred the election of Bell and Everett, but saw they had no chance, and he did not want to help Douglas or Breckinridge: so he stood aside and let Lincoln go in. This is as I understood the matter. Yours, Horace Greeley." A great example with fun content! (Est. $500-750)
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Hannibal Hamlin has no spare Lincoln autographs!
361. HAMLIN, Hannibal. (1809-93) Vice President 1861-64, Democratic Senator and Representative from Maine, Hamlin changed his party affiliation over his anti-slavery sentiments. He was chosen Governor by the Republicans in 1857, resigning to serve in the Senate before joining Lincoln's ticket. ANS, March 20, 1891, 4 x 2" on lined paper. Hamlin writes: "I long since parted with the last autograph of Pres't Lincoln that I could spare." Fun association with the aged former V.P. writing some 25 years after sharing the Executive office with Lincoln. Bold, clean. (Est. $500-700)
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Lincoln's closest assistant writes on the President's genealogy.
362. HAY, John. (1838-1905) In addition to serving closely as one of President Lincoln's personal secretaries, Hay was Secretary of State under both McKinley and Roosevelt. ALS, on letterhead from "Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C." Dec. 22 [n.y.], to Frank C. Harris: "Dear Sir, I thank you very much for the interesting paper you have so kindly sent me. I think the Abraham mentioned must have been the half-brother of John Lincoln, the President's great grandfather -- and therefore a cousin of Abraham, the Kentucky Pioneer, the grand father of the President. Yours sincerely, John Hay." About as pretty - and content-rich an example as you will find! A pristine specimen. (Est. $900-1,200)
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363. [HAY, John.] With ownership attribution to Lincoln's inner-circle. Poems, Lyrical and Idyllic by E. C. Stedman. (Charles Scribner, NY: 1860) Green cloth cover, 196pp., inscribed on free-endpaper "John Hay, Executive Mansion 1862." Now... the inscription is definitely in period ink... but not in Hay's hand. We assume that this is simply an ownership attribution - making this a neat relic! (OPEN)
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364. HARRISON, Benjamin. (1833-1901) Civil War soldier: In 1862 Governor Oliver P. Morton asked Harrison to recruit and command the 70th Regiment of Indiana Volunteers in the Civil War. Colonel Harrison molded his regiment into a well disciplined unit that fought in many battles. His soldiers called him "Little Ben" because he was only 5 feet 6 inches tall. A fearless commander, Harrison rose to the rank of brigadier general. And, by the way, he eventually became President! ADS, a check completely in the hand of Harrison for nine dollars and fifty cents, January 3, 1880. Excellent condition, a fine specimen. (Est. $300-400)
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An extremely rare Andrew Johnson
autograph note signed as President.


365. JOHNSON, Andrew. (1808-75) Johnson was a Tennessee Congressman and Senator who supported the Union over secession, and when he defended the Lincoln administration, he was considered a traitor by the South. Lincoln appointed him Military Governor of Tennessee and chose him to be his second Vice President, becoming President after the assassination. Often clashing with the Radical Republicans, he was impeached though acquitted. During his Presidency, he continued Lincoln's Reconstruction policy and purchased Alaska. Very rare ANS, [n.p.], [n.d.], signed "Andrew Johnson" in pencil. Johnson wrote: "You will please permit me to introduce to your favorable consideration Mr. Phillips of the N[ew York] Herald. If you can make some appointment that would be suitable to Mr. Philips it will confer a special favor on me. Mr. P. will explain to you the character of the appointment." The card, which has small staple holes that affect nothing, is in fine condition overall. Unquestionably, Johnson is the rarest Chief Executive in handwritten Presidential material. (Est. $1,800-2,200)
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366. [JOHNSON, Andrew] Printed proclamation by President Johnson, September 9, 1867, on blue paper, signed in type by Johnson and Sec. of State Seward, 8 1/2 x 14". This Presidential proclamation is both a warning to citizens and notice that the Army and Navy would "assist" the courts - and other civil authorities - with conducting the business of government in still-hostile states. Despite opposition from citizens in North and South Carolina, attempting to bypass enforcement of federal law, the President was exerting Reconstruction policy. This was addressed to former Rebels still bitter about the war and radicals who were intent on punishing the South for the rebellion. H. McCulloch, the Secretary of the Treasury and a carryover from the Lincoln Administration, also signs in type at the top of the proclamation. Docketed by hand at bottom by recipient. Archivally restored in upper and lower left corners, some loss along bottom, quite a scarce document. (Est. $400-600)
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367. [Andrew Johnson - Black Americana] A highly detailed and charged cartoon by Thomas Nast from the September 1, 1866 issue of Harper's Weekly, on a centerfold sheet measuring 16 x 22" entitled "Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction" representing Johnson as a half-hearted reformer playing Iago to the wounded Black veteran's Othello. Flanked by illustrations of anti-reconstruction riots in Memphis and New Orleans. A few minor marginal chips, horizontal fold at center, else very good. (Est. $150-200)
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Last year we made an error...
this one is the "real McCoy!"
368. LAMON, Ward Hill. (1828-93) Illinois lawyer, later Washington Marshall and Lincoln bodyguard who the President called "my particular friend." Lamon's Life of Abraham Lincoln (1872) was based chiefly on material which Lamon bought from W.H. Herndon. 5 1/2 x 3 1/2" leaf from an autograph album boldly inscribed "Ward H. Lamon, Washington, D.C., May 5, 1866." A prohibitively rare autograph... the one other example we've seen, offered in this catalog last year, turned out to not be "correct." This one certainly is! (Est. $200-400)
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369. NAST, Thomas. (1840-1902) American political cartoonist whose works in Harper's Weekly lambasted the Tweed Ring, and made the elephant and donkey recognized as the symbols of the Republican and Democratic parties. D.S., Morristown, New Jersey, June 16, 1896, a check drawn on Nast's account in the amount of $2.50. A really nice example. (Est. $150-180)
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Lincoln's Secretaries prepare for the President to greet his generals... the very day he signs the Emancipation Proclamation!

370. NICOLAY, John George and STANTON, Edwin McMasters. Autograph Letter Signed with additional Autograph Endorsement Signed on "Executive Mansion" stationery, Washington, Dec. 29, 1862. Nicolay's note to the "Hon. Secretary of War" reads: "Dear Sir, You will please notify the officers of the Army that the President will receive them on New Year's day at half past eleven o'clock, precisely. Your obt. Servt Jno. G. Nicolay." In pen at the bottom, Stanton replies: "The Adjutant General will issue instructions in conformity with the foregoing notice. Edwin M. Stanton Sec of War." On New Year's Day, 1863, Lincoln met with his officers in an official reception at the Executive Mansion. Sec. Welles and other colleagues likewise attended the celebration. Following this warm gathering, Secretary of State Seward convenes the Cabinet in a room at the Mansion where Lincoln signed the final draft of the Emancipation Proclamation and ordered copies to be distributed. An incredible piece of history from that fateful day... with parallel correspondence from two of Lincoln's closest advisers. One light vertical fold, overall bold and clean. (Est. $1,500-2,500)
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One of "Bull Run" Russell's earliest war reports.
371. RUSSELL, William H. (1820-1907) Known as "Bull Run" Russell, noted correspondent covering the Civil War for the London Times. His unflattering account of Union conduct at First Manassas earned him the enmity of both officers and soldiers with an attempt actually made on his life. A fine content and rare book, The Civil War in America (Boston: Garnier A. Fuller, 1861), 189pp., 8vo. ( 4.5 x 7.5"), titled paper wraps with later hard cloth binding. Part one of a serial in issue No. 1 of Fuller's Modern Age, the book includes Russell's wartime letters from Washington, on March 29, 1861 through June 19, 1861. A fascinating look at the early days of the Civil War before the slaughter began in earnest at Bull Run Creek on July 21, 1861. Cleanly mounted on the inside front cover and front blank leaf is a bold Autograph Letter Signed, 2pp. 4.25 x 7", Washington, October 7, [n.y., likely 1861] declining an invitation to deliver a lecture. At this time, Russell was a bit of a celebrity in Washington. Signature bold, pages clean, overall fine condition. A scarce, early volume at the outset of the war. (Est. $400-600)
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372. STODDARD, William O. (1835-1925) One of Lincoln's private White House secretaries, a clerk who later penned numerous books - both on Lincoln and highly enjoyed children's stories. Signed Photograph. A 4.25 x 6" photo mounted on an 8 x 10 3/4" board signed at bottom and dated 1910. Imprint by W.C. & L.C. Parker of Morristown, N.J., moderate discoloration to photo at top right, minor glue stain at top and some loss of board at top and lower left. Together with a cabinet card featuring Stoddard, by Kleindinst of Madison, N.J. Small black spot on Stoddard's chin, minor loss of board at lower right. Also, a cabinet card of William Stoddard's daughter, by Pach Brothers of New York. Three (3) items together. (Est. $300-500)
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Lincoln's Sec. of State forwards an
"intercepted" Southern paper...
providing military intelligence!


373. SEWARD, William H. LS, Dept. of State, Washington, January 9, 1863, to Major General Halleck. Marked "Unofficial" in the upper left corner. "My Dear general, I send you an intercepted Southern paper, thinking there may possibly be something in it, interesting or useful to you. Yours very truly, William H. Seward." Henry Halleck had recently assumed his new position as Commander and Chief of the Army following the success of his subordinates at Fort Donelson and Shiloh during the summer of 1862. While we don't know what was said about Halleck in the Southern paper to which Seward refers, we can suppose it may have had something to do with Halleck's one try at a field command during the war, at Corinth, Mississippi, where his timid advance allowed the Confederates to withdraw at their leisure. Minor vertical crease, a bold signature on an interesting war-date document. (Est. $700-900)
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374. SEWARD, William H. Free-franked cover with postal-cancellation and "FREE" stamp addressed by Lincoln's Sec. of State to a New Yorker. One small tape repair at top to the left of franking signature, a fine specimen. (Est. $60-80)
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375. STANTON, Edwin McMasters. (1814-69) Secretary of War under Lincoln and Johnson. His dismissal by Johnson precipitated the impeachment. A.L.S. 8 x 9.5" on War Department letterhead, Washington, Feb. 28, 1865. Less than two months before Lincoln's assassination, Stanton writes the Chair of the House Military Committee, Robert C. Schenck: "The proposed amendment submitted was designed as a check on application for rank beyond that fixed by law for the chiefs of Bureaus. I will examine it and if found to be adequate for the bill will send it to you in a more distinct shape..." Irregularly trimmed, not affecting text, usual folds, otherwise fine condition. A nice example. (Est. $200-300)
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376. SUMNER, Charles. (1811-74) Senator, strident abolitionist, intimate of Lincoln White House. AES, on a letter by Lt. Edward Southworth, Hannover, PA, Dec. 8, 1864, to Sumner asking if he can arrange transportation of two officers' wives from New York to Florida. Sumner responds on verso endorsing: "Can passes be given to the wives of officers named herein? Charles Sumner, Senate Chamber 15th Dec. `64." Minor separation at fold, otherwise fine. (Est. $150-200)
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"Old Neptune" advertises for military
suppliers in Northeastern newspapers of note.
377. WELLES, Gideon. (1802-78) Sec. of the Navy affectionately known as "Old Neptune." Manuscript LS by Welles as Sec. of the Navy. Washington, October 10, 1864, 2pp., on imprinted Navy Department letterhead. To Major W.B. Slack directing him to advertise proposals for rations, clothing and military equipment in several newspapers. He lists 21 newspapers in which the ads are to run and instructs him: "...Before sending out the advertisements you are desired to consult the Department in person in reference to the price to be paid each paper..." Interestingly, Wells did not include Greeley's Tribune which was, of course, hostile to Union interests. At the time of writing, the complete collapse of the Confederacy was only months away. Any doubts about the possibility of Union failure had evaporated when Sherman marched into Atlanta on September 2, helping assure Lincoln's election to a second term as President. A great piece of history. (Est. $600-800)
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War-date orders from the Secretary of the Navy regarding acceptable disabilities!
378. WELLES, Gideon. Manuscript Letter Signed, 2pp., June 13, 1864, Navy Department letterhead. To James Greene, Naval Asylum, Philadelphia. Orders the convening of a physical examination board providing exact instructions on its conduct. The letter outlines that officers ordered to report before the head of the Naval Asylum must be examined for injuries ("loss of limb, impaired senses of hearing, sight...") and once facts are determined, must make recommendations regarding promotion or retirement. Great content... and a pretty example! (Est. $300-500)
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379. [Lincoln Associates] Autograph album, maintained over 25-plus years by James H. Mandeville of Penn Yan, N.Y. and Washington, D.C.; signed and dated by him (Dec. 1861) on the first page. Sm. 8vo.; orig. thick brown leather, w/decorative design of an album and quill (in gilt) surrounded by foliage (in black) on front and back covers; a.e.g. The majority of signatures found in this album are from Mandeville's friends, relatives and apparent classmates and co-workers, but interspersed among them is a small but remarkable group of autographs by noted personalities who had close connections to Abraham Lincoln: "M[athew] B. Brady" (famed photographer, especially known for his Lincoln portraits and Civil War views; an extremely rare, fine and bold signature at the top of a page, signed lower down by unidentified others); "Ward H. Lamon" (a law partner and close friend of Lincoln from his Illinois days, appointed by him Marshal of the District of Columbia); "R[obert] T. Lincoln" (the President's eldest son, later Sec. War for Garfield and Arthur; a rare 1860's-vintage signature, on a page by itself); "Mark W. Delahay / U S District Judge / for the District of Kansas" on a page with "J.H. Lane / Kansas" (Delahay, a collateral relative of Mary Todd Lincoln, was closely associated with her husband in Republican politics, hosted his 1859 Kansas visit, and received his judicial appointment from him; Lane, Kansas Senator and "Jayhawker", was close to Lincoln early in the war and led the capital's "Frontier Guards" who were bivouacked at the White House); "M[ontgomery] Blair/of Maryland/P[ost] M[aster] Genl" (in Lincoln's Cabinet); and Civil War Congressmen and strong Lincoln supporters "Wm. D. Kellley" and "John Sherman" (who later served at times as Sec. of War and Sec. Treasury). Binding with light wear to extrems.; pages with light handling soil and marginal toning. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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In the middle of the war, correspondence between two
publishing icons on "electrotypes" of Lincoln. Harper writes to Moses Beach on available prints.

380. HARPER, James Welsey. One of the four Harpers who formed the publishing house of Harper & Brothers in 1833. Manuscript L.S. 7.5 x 9.5" on Harper & Brothers letterhead, New York, Nov 5, 1862 to New York Sun publisher Moses Yale Beach informing him that "We cannot send you electrotypes of Mr. Lincoln & Gen. Rosecrans till tomorrow. Shall we send them?" Moses Yale Beach (1800-68) was at first an inventor and then a newspaper owner and financial wizard. He owned/published the New York Sun - the best and most successful of the penny newspapers. Beach was quite innovative in his gathering of news. He had a fleet of his own sailing vessels that met ships down the bay and were the first to acquire news from Europe. He had special trains running between New York and Baltimore, carrier pigeons, and horse expresses to Albany. He also had horse expresses that carried news from Bristol to London and during the Mexican War set up a special railroad news service between Mobile and Montgomery, Alabama. In his constant war with other newspapers in New York he realized that a tremendous amount of money was being wasted. This led to a meeting at the Sun offices between Beach, the Herald, Tribune, Courier and Enquirer, Express, etc. in which Beach proposed what became The Associated Press. Usual folds, one partially split, otherwise very good and bright. Wonderful association. (Est. $200-300)
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THE PINKERTON PAGES


A tremendous rarity:
the only Civil War ALS in private hands.


381. PINKERTON, Allan. (1819-84) American detective, founding Chief of the U.S. Secret Service, head of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, a cooper by trade, Pinkerton emigrated to the United States in 1842 opening a cooper's shop in West Dundee, Ill. That storefront became a station on the Underground Railroad. His discovery and capture of a band of counterfeiters led to an 1846 appointment as the county sheriff. In 1850 he became the first city detective of the Chicago police force. That year he also opened a private detective agency which enjoyed considerable success in solving train and express-company robberies. In 1861, he foiled a plot to kidnap or assassinate Abraham Lincoln -- convincing the President-elect to re-route his train trip through Baltimore on his way to Washington. During the Civil War Pinkerton organized and directed an extensive espionage system behind Confederate lines. In 1869, his agency secured evidence on which the Molly Maguires were broken-up. After Pinkerton's death, the agency was continued by his sons, Robert A. Pinkerton and William A. Pinkerton - a business entity that continues to this day.

Autograph Letter Signed "Allan Pinkerton" to S.D. Young, Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Rail Road, Washington, D.C., June 9, 1862. One page, 4to., ruled, small tape burn from reinforcement on verso not affecting text, docketed below signature. The Union's chief spymaster - whose logo of an "All-Seeing Eye" engendered the appellation "private eye" - writes:
"I am in camp near Richmond but have to send A.K. Littlefield from thence to Chicago on important business. If consistent can you leave a pass for him from Harrisburg to Pittsburg and return, at the Ticket Office in Harrisburg. Allan Pinkerton."
This letter was written as Stonewall Jackson's troops continued to decimate Union forces in one major engagement after another. Pinkerton, serving as General George McClellan's chief detective in the Department of Ohio, returned to Washington in April 1861 to formally organize the Secret Service. In 1862, operating out of McClellan's camp, he gathered information from captured Confederates and runaway slaves on enemy troop strength. He helped convince "Little Mac" that his troops were vastly outnumbered and ill-prepared for continued assault. Three months later, Pinkerton had a private meeting with Lincoln at the White House, on September 22, to discuss the failed Antietam campaign, the withdrawal of forces, and the possible removal of McClellan. The "great hesitator" would be removed from his command two months later at which time Pinkerton also stepped off the field. American Book Prices Current lists no example of a Pinkerton ALS in the market over the last thirty years. A survey of several major dealers likewise failed to yield an example. The very few Pinkerton letters known to remain extant - save those found in the corporate archive now on deposit at the Library of Congress - were written in the 1870s, well after the war. We believe this to be the only Civil War-dated letter in the market.
(Est. $4,000-5,000)
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382. Lincoln's detective, Allan Pinkerton, posed in the group. A carte portrait presenting some of McClellan's staff in the field at Antietam, Pinkerton found second from right. Some loss to back of board from album removal, typical rubbing to mount, an early print on a gold-ruled board, exceptional clarity and contrast... a rich portrait taken by Alexander Gardner at the time Lincoln visited with McClellan in the field on October 3, 1862. A rare, important photograph. (Est. $400-600)
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Sending instructions to his illustrator... work commissioned for his landmark book on Lincoln and forming the Secret Service.
383. [Allan PINKERTON]
A fine set of three letters, we believe secretarially signed, two manuscript and the third typed, all written to the illustrator Joseph B. Beall of Philadelphia in which Pinkerton discusses a group of proposed illustrations to be rendered for his book, The Spy of the Rebellion. In a typed letter, 6pp., New York, October 26, 1882 on Pinkerton's National Detective Agency letterhead, he notes that "No. 1... should represent a correct likeness of Gen. McClellan and myself. Of course, the General is in uniform, but not with a star on his breast, for that is useless. I suppose you have a likeness of myself, but you know me very well, so I need not say any more in regard to this. I was in blue, but no insignia of uniform about me.... No. 2 is one of my men, Timothy Webster, disguised... No. 3 is a colored boy firing a revolver. He has killed a citizen, who, by the way, is a rebel secessionist... No. 12 is Timothy Webster [see plate opposite p. 542 in the book]...Sentenced and executed by Jefferson Davis... as a spy. Of course, the soldiers and officers are in grey, and Webster's death warrant was just read to him. Of course, his hands should be pinioned but his arms are straight down. The woman is Hattie Lewis, one of our employees during the rebellion. Webster, however, acted like a man, and the secret of a spy died with him. He is the hero of the book... He was calm and would not yield to give a single item while he lived... The handcuffs should not be used. Let it appear as if the prisoner was bound with rope, and have two or three chairs in the room. Have Webster appear life-like. Now, my friend, Mr. Beale, I have given you the best possible description of the scenes. Mr. Carleton wishes to have them done in ten or twelve days..." Two other manuscript letters, each one page, dated 1882 and 1883 deal with the billing and delivery of the illustrations to the printer. Interestingly Beall is not credited as an illustrator, only the engraver is noted on the actual plates in the book. Great history! (Est. $400-500)
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He guarded President-elect Lincoln
on his trip to Washington.

384. PINKERTON, William. Son of Allan Pinkerton who, with his brother Robert, ran the Pinkerton National Detective Agency after their father's death in 1884. During his tenure, the Pinkerton agency became well-known for their disruption of organized labor and protection of strike breakers. Pinkerton detectives figured prominently in the violence during the Homestead Strike of 1892 in which they killed ten strikers. William Pinkerton gained national prominence by solving the infamous Adams Express robberies and guarding President-elect Lincoln on his way to Washington. A scarce signed cabinet card photograph by Gibson Art Galleries, Chicago measuring 4 x 5.5" on a 6 x 9" mount signed "Very truly yours Wm. A. Pinkerton" on the photo. Very fine condition. Pristine. (Est. $500-700)
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Inscribed by his son Robert.
385. PINKERTON, Robert. Inscribed copy of his father's study, The Spy of the Rebellion: Being a True History of the Spy System of the United States Army during the Late Rebellion, Allan Pinkerton. (New York: G.W. Carleton and Co., 1883), 688p., 8vo., (6.5 x 9.5"). Inscribed on the front blank flyleaf by his son to E. A. Newell. Illustrated with full page plates after engravings with additional illustrations. Bound in pictorial gilt decorated cloth with the logo of the Pinkerton Agency - "We Never Sleep" in gilt on front cover. Besides being the founder of the world's most famous detective agency, Allan Pinkerton was chief of the Secret Service from 1861 to 1862. During his tenure with the Secret Service, he managed to foil an assassination plot in Baltimore while Lincoln was traveling to Washington for his inauguration as President. Volume details his numerous adventures during the Civil War and provides a fascinating and concise detailing of the early U.S. Intelligence services. Front board a tad loose, light rubbing to boards, pages very clean and bright. (Est. $400-600)
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A rare salesman's sample copy.
386. A remarkable find, an actual salesman's "abridged" version of Pinkerton's book, The Spy of the Rebellion. (G.W. Carleton & Co., NY: 1886) Bound in titled red cloth boards with gilt eye logo of the Pinkerton Agency: "We Never Sleep" and an example of the spine on the back board accomplished in gilt. Bears enlarged versions of numerous illustrations found in the original. At the end of the book there are seven ledger pages designed to record subscriptions for the book. The first subscription page bears two names (obviously this was not a very successful salesman), below a notice declaring "This large, handsome, octavo volume, contains nearly 700 pages, printed from beautiful clear type, on fine paper, made expressly for the work. Richly and profusely Illustrated. Elegantly bound, and furnished at the following remarkably low prices: English Cloth, Gold and Black Enameled, - - - $3.50 Strongly Bound in Sheep, Library Style, - - 4.50." Affixed to the inside back cover is an example of the spine in "Library Style". Very minor rubbing at top and bottom of boards, pages lightly foxed, but overall clean. A superb example, the only one we have seen - likely the only copy extant. (Est. $200-300)
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The Successor to Pinkerton.
387. Lafayette C. Baker. History of the United States Secret Service. (Philadelphia: L.C. Baker, 1867) 704pp., tooled cloth boards and titled spine. Baker succeed Pinkerton as head of the Secret Service and Lafayette largely owed his appointment to Sec. of War Edwin M. Stanton but suspected the secretary of corruption and was eventually demoted for tapping his telegraph lines and packed off to New York. He was quickly recalled, however, after the assassination of President Lincoln in 1865. Within two days of his arrival in Washington, Baker's agents in Maryland had made four arrests and had the names of two more conspirators, including the actual presidential assassin John Wilkes Booth. Before the month was out Booth, along with David Herold were found holed up in a barn and Booth was shot and killed. Baker was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General and received a generous share of the $100,000 reward offered for the apprehension of the President's killer. The following year, however, Baker was sacked from his position as government spymaster. President Johnson accused him of spying on him, a charge Baker admitted in this book which was published in response. He also announced that he had had Booth's diary in his possession which was being suppressed by the Department of War and Secretary Stanton. When the diary was eventually produced Baker claimed that eighteen vital pages were missing. It was suggested that these would implicate Stanton in the assassination. Baker died from meningitis in 1868, scarcely eighteen months after his explosive allegations, leading some to suggest that he was killed by the War Dept. to silence him. Wear to boards and spine, boards binding still fairly tight, pages very clean. (Est. $100-150)

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