AUTOGRAPHS AND MANUSCRIPTS

PART II (Lots 387-451)

CLICK HERE FOR PART
I (Lots 306-386)

AUTOGRAPHS - MILITARY
BOTH UNION AND CONFEDERATE
388. ALLEN, William Wirt. (1835-94) Confederate major general who commanded a brigade of cavalry with Wheeler at Atlanta, also wounded at Perryville. Rare war-date A.E.S. on the verso of a manuscript D.S., 1p. 4to., "Graham Station, N.C.", Apr. 17, 1865, a medical certificate of disability issued to Pvt. W. A. Lipscomb and signed by two surgeons. On the verso, Allen approves the discharge: "Headquarters Allen's Div. April 18th/65 Approved & respectfully forwarded. Wm. W. Allen Brig. Gen. Com". Some stains and a few tiny holes generally not affecting the endorsement, also endorsed by Capt. D. P. Forney, a Col. D. Blakey, and E. L. Lewis. Of particular interest is the fact that Allen endorses this document a full nine days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox! (Est. $500-700)
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Rare Kentucky cavalry appointment signed by Robert Anderson of Ft. Sumter fame only months after the start of the Civil War.
389. ANDERSON, Robert. (1805-71) The "Defender of Fort Sumter," Anderson was a pro-slavery Kentuckian who remained loyal to the Union in the most difficult circumstances... while under bombardment! DS, Sept. 23, 1864, Louisville, KY. The document is on Head Quarters Department of Cumberland stationery. The appointment for J.B. Alexander reads, "Sir, by virtue of authroity in me vested by the President of the United States, I hereby appoint you 1st Liutenant of the 1st Regiment of Kentucky Cavalry volunteers..." Signed by Robert Anderson, Brig. General Commanding Dep't. A fine item. (Est. $600-800)
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One of the first uses of the phrase
"the Afro-American race."
An important missive.
390. BANKS, Nathaniel P. (1816-94). Union Major General, veteran of Shenandoah Valley campaign who later replaced Benjamin Butler as military governor of Louisiana. Lengthy ALS "N. P. Banks" as Congressman, 4pp, Waltham, MA, Sep 9, 1889. Superb political content. A closely written appeal to Senator George F. Hoar (1826-1904) pleading the case of a black constituent and deploring unfair hiring practices in Navy Yard and other government positions. In very small part, regarding John D. Powell, Jr.: "a remarkable man...His energy and activity are unlimited. He knows no fear, is greatly skilled in obtaining information in what relates to the opinions & actions of men & though often disappointed in his expectations is not disheartened. These with other good qualities are balanced by frailties of his race, 'The Afro American Race' as he styles it...In the Congressional contest of the 5th District he did good work, as manager of 'The Boston Advocate' and always came to the support of other men's ideas when his own were not adopted...he is a valuable man & ought to be cheerfully & gladly sustained in his request & need of Government employment. I have done for him all I could..." Banks describes his repeated but frustrated efforts to assist Mr. Powell and the intent of government employees to hire like-minded persons regardless of qualifications. He informs Senator Hoar of the current naval yard storekeeper who is "reputed to have been a deserter from the Union army" and that he was transferred to accommodate the appointment of another political friend of "Mr. Lodge" at Washington over Mr. Powell who was indeed qualified. Banks describes other similar instances. He concludes, "...Nothing good can come out of it. I see men of the Union Army constantly who tell me they have no chance, and the same of the Union Navy! That is not right! It is the same with Mr. Powell & his compatriots. They have no chance. They cannot even ask for place or employment & of course don't get. I walked the entire distance from the...Hotel to Fanueil Hall on the day President Harrison was recd. there. It was a magnificent reception. But I saw few colored people out that day. Their numbers may be small, but if they turn upon the leaders of the Administration, it will be a wreck of one side or the other. I do not know who has a better right to ask...the favor of honest work & pay than the Union soldiers & sailors and they who lead the Emancipated race of Americans...." Darkly penned and signed, adding "M. C." Fine. (Est. $400-500)
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Superb war-date ALS of Beauregard on: "...the drawings and sketches... 1st Corps. Army of Potomac... drawings of the battlefield of Manassas."
391. BEAUREGARD, Pierre G. T. ALS, January 27, 1862, 2pp., darkly penned and signed twice with the initials "GTB" and flourish. There is minor loss of a tiny area at top and bottom left, affecting only one letter, the "P" in "P.S.". The letter reads in full: "Dear Col. 1. Are those flag drawings finished? 2. Order Mr. Grant to mark all the drawings & sketches in his possession `1st Corps Army of Potomac - so that we may reclaim them if ever we come back - 3. Order Private Ammen on topographical duty to turn in his sketches to Mr. Grant... and to Qr. Mr. Dept. & report to his Regt. as soon thereafter as possible acknowledging properly his services. I will call to see you today. G.T.B. P. S. Has Mr. Grant ever duplicated those drawings of the battle field of Manassas? I had given him orders to do so as soon as practicable. I want to take the copies with me to go with the copy of my report. G.T.B." The Battle of Manassas was of course also known as the Battle of Bull Run where Union forces were routed by the Confederates in a battle watched by Washington residents who had come by carriage expecting to see the war won in one day. This letter shows Beauregard in his full glory.
(Est. $2,000-2,500)
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392. BEAUREGARD, Pierre G. T. (1818-93) Confederate major general who initiated the attack on Fort Sumter that started the Civil War. He also led with distinction at First Bull Run, Shiloh, and in the defense of Richmond. AES, Aug 13, 1865, New Orleans. An autograph endorsement signed "Recd. at N.O. Augt 13th 1865 G.T.B" at the bottom of the second page of Beauregard's copy of a letter from William T. Sherman (the copy of Sherman's letter was secretarially written and signed). Sherman was responding to Beauregard's letter requesting his personal papers and effects that were seized during the Civil War. In small part: "...I have sent both to Genl Hoffman at Washington with this Endorsement...'they should be returned to him as something too small for a great Government to notice...'". He suggests other channels he might pursue and concludes: "...all conventions should be religiously kept, for on them are based the most Sacred Rights of War and consequent Peace...". Chipping to top left corner of second sheet. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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393. [Beauregard] Stirring 5 x 8" printed circular from General P.G.T. Beauregard and boldly signed in ink by his adjutant, Captain John M. Otey, with period inked instruction "To be read to each Corps." On letterhead reading "Head Quarters of the Forces," Corinth, Miss., May 2, 1862. In this oft-quoted document, General Beauregard, who had replaced Albert Sidney Johnston when he was killed at Shiloh, implores the soldiers of the combined Army of Tennessee and Army of Mississippi to greet the "invaders of our soil" with fortitude and resolve in the pending "shock of battle" where "we shall recover more than we have lately lost!" Morale had plummeted in Southern ranks as Confederate soldiers had marched back to Corinth following the battle at Pittsburg Landing three weeks before. At Corinth, Beauregard built fortifications and awaited an attack from General Halleck that never came. By late May, Beauregard realized Corinth must be evacuated, not only because Halleck's army was significantly larger, but also due to the lack of water in Corinth and disease among Southern troops. Although Beauregard was successful in withdrawing his army safely, he himself left his army citing illness (possibly a nervous breakdown) and was then relieved by Davis. Discoloration at fold, some darkening at center, else very fine. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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394 BEAUREGARD, Pierre G. T. War-date signed and hand-addressed envelope front panel, hand-carried to one "Col. L. C. Brackett at Variety Club" and signed at top: "From Gen'l Beauregard". Sold with an oval portrait carte, Beauregard in pre-war uniform, backstamp by C. C. Giers, Nashville. Some soiling and a glue stain at lower margin, else fine. (Est. $400-500)
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395. BRAGG, Braxton. (1817-76) Confederate major general who served under Albert Sidney Johnston in Kentucky, and led at Shiloh, Perryville and Stones River, relieved for his poor performance at Chickamauga and Chattanooga. ALS, "Braxton Bragg" adding rank, Jefferson Barracks, Jan. 11, 1850, with integral postal cover and wax seal with Bragg's monogram. In part: "...I am informed by Surgeon Finley that he has chosen the quarters which I occupy at present...I select for my own use the house...occupied by Capt. K. [?]...I regret the necessity I am under...". Minor paper loss right upper corner not affecting text, overall very good. A fine specimen. (Est. $500-800)
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The largest signed presentation photograph we have seen!
396. BUTTERFIELD, Daniel. (1831-1901) Union major general who commanded a brigade at Bull Run and led a corps in the desperate assault on Marye's Heights. Butterfield is also credited with writing "Taps." Massive 16 x 19" presentation Inscribed Signed Photograph: "To the brave men who served under my command in days gone by and who are now my comrades in the G. A. R. & belong to Post 353 - Greenpoint Long Island - with kind regards of their old commander." Dampstains on left and right edges, light bank of mottling at knee level, does not detract, uneven tone on verso. A really impressive item! (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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Lee's Chief of Staff charges an officer with "dodging behind a stump"
and self-inflicting a wound!

397. CHILTON, Robert H. (1815-79) Confederate Brigadier General, Robert E. Lee's Chief of Staff. He signed the famous "lost order" of the Antietam campaign and led forces at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania. Quite scarce war-date manuscript DS "R. H. Chilton", 2pp., March 8, 1863, legal folio, Headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, Special Orders #36, the finding of a Court of Inquiry convened at the request of Lt. J. Morris, Co E, 35th Georgia Regiment. Excellent content regarding the alleged misdeeds of Morris: "...at the Battle of Seven Pines after dodging behind a stump 110 yards in the rear of his company...left his company at the Battle of Mechanicsville and went to Richmond.. .inflicted the wound on himself in order to avoid the dangers of the fight..." Portion of second leaf removed at time (no affect), light age, very good. An interesting specimen with war content. (Est. $200-300)
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398. CLARK, Charles. (1811-77) Confederate Brigadier General, Major General of Mississippi Militia, and wartime Governor of Mississippi. Scarce wardate partly printed DS, as Governor, March 9, 1864, Macon, Miss. Issuing a warrant: "...in favor of Capt. W L Williams, atty of S Reeves, for Two hundred twenty five Dollars for one horse by Gen. Glevelson, impressed under the provisions of `An act to authorize the impressment of slaves and other personal property for military purposes..." A very fine example. (Est. $200-300)
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399. CLAY, Cecil. (1842-1907) Union Brevet Brigadier General, 58th Pennsylvania; awarded Medal of Honor for action at Fort Harrison, VA (September 29, 1864), where he lost an arm while leading a charge. Wardate partly printed ADS, as Captain, Company Commander, June 25, 1862, at Portsmouth. A soldier's disability certificate signed in the text and again at conclusion. Quite a fine example. (Est. $75-150)
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The "Little Drummer Boy" marches in Herbert Hoover's Inauguration.
400. CLEM, John L. (1851-1937) Known as both "The Drummer Boy of Chickamauga" and "The Drummer Boy of Shiloh," Clem "enlisted" as a drummer at the ripe old age of ten. At 12, he captured a Confederate colonel at Chickamauga. Clem was twice wounded at Atlanta. He remained in active service longer than anyone in U.S. military history, retiring as a brigadier general. Fine ALS, [n.d.], War Department, on stationery of the Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania Battlefields Memorial Commission, light toning at usual folds, to Charles Fay. Includes postal-canceled transmittal envelope addressed by Clem dated February 16, 1929 affixed to album leaf. In part: "We are kept busy here & will be very busy until after the Inauguration & represent the Commander-in-Chief G.A.R. in the parade. Ten of us are the `Guard of Honor' to the President. Expect great crowds." A fun specimen! (Est. $200-300)
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"I have been in fourteen bloody battles..."
401. DENNIS, Elias S. (1812-94) War-date ALS, with affixed clipped signature, 3pp., Vicksburg, MS, November 7, 1863, on "Headquarters, First Division, 17th Army Corps," letterhead, from General Dennis to his sister. Dennis had a fine war record including fighting at Fort Donelson, in Tennessee and during the Vicksburg campaign. He writes, in part: "...How many...times have I thought of you and your family since this terrible war commenced. I have been...in fourteen bloody battles...Dear sister, your children shall never have cause to blush with shame when...the name of their Uncle is mentioned. I intend to come out of this war with all the honors my country can bestow on a soldier or die in the field..." Damp stains along left margin, all quite legible; much more fabulous content. (Est. $200-300)
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402. DIX, John A. (1798-1879), Union Maj. Gen. of Volunteers, renowned for his order to "shoot...on the spot" anyone tearing down the U.S. flag; Sec. War Stanton's conduit for disseminating war news (including that of Lincoln's murder) while headquartered in N.Y.C., the country's telegraph hub. Engraved construction stock certificate of the Mississippi & Missouri Railroad Co., signed by Dix as President, 1 page, oblong small 4to, N.Y., n.d. (1850's). Unissued; in rich blue on light paper, with beautiful central vignette of Indians, buffalo and steam train plus smaller ones of steamboat and warrior with tomahawk. The Mississippi and Missouri co-owned the first railroad bridge across the Mississippi River, between Rock Island, Ill. and Davenport, Iowa. When it was hit in 1856 by the steamboat Effie Afton, which burned and sank, the resulting lawsuit became one of Abraham Lincoln's most famous cases, in which he declared that the right of railroads to bridge rivers equaled that of steamboats to navigate them. Excellent condition and quite attractive. (Est. $100-200)
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Doubleday lobbies hard...
assigned to defend Washington despite the fact that "Sec. Stanton did not issue the order..."
A great, war-date letter.

403. DOUBLEDAY, Abner. (1819-93) Union major general said to have fired Fort Sumter's first shot. He led the 1st Corps at Gettysburg after Reynolds's death but is best remembered (and mistakenly credited) as the father of modern baseball. Fine war-date ALS, 2pp., March 2, 1862, Washington D.C., to Col. William H. Christian, commander of Fort Lyon, VA., regarding Doubleday's appointment as Inspector of Washington's defenses. Doubleday writes: "My Dear Colonel, I have been shelved for the present by being placed in command of the Forts on this side of the River. My friends are very indignant and as Sec. Stanton did not issue the order they think they can have it changed. You may rest assured I shall use every exertion to go into the Field and as Senators Wade and Chandler & others are disposed to use their influence in my behalf I am not without hopes they may be successful. If so, you may rely upon my obtaining your Regiment if possible. If you chance to visit the City, call at my office. It is still located in the same place. Yours Very Truly, A. Doubleday." With original yellow transmittal cover. Letter is very fine, slight loss to cover at top, very minor soiling, else good. Together with original Special Order 54 assigning Doubleday as Inspector of Washington's defenses, February 24, 1862. Issued from "Hd. Qur's, Army of the Potomac, Washington", the Order reads: "Brig. General Abner Doubleday Volunteer service is assigned to duty as Inspector of the defensive works about Washington, and to the immediate charge of those on the Maryland side. By command of Major General McClellan (signed), S. Williams Office Chief of Artillery." Very good condition. A great pair of documents with content revealing Doubleday's commitment to being assigned the post he desires. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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404. [DOUBLEDAY] Gettysburg Made Plain. A succinct account of the campaign and battles, with the aid of one diagram and twenty-nine maps. (New York: The Century Co., copyright 1888). 12mo. 59 pp., [1 (blank)] p.; illus. First edition; printed at the DeVinne Press. The author, the mythical creator of baseball, took command of I Corps at Gettysburg after General Reynolds was killed. On the third day of the battle he played a role in the repulse of Pickett's charge. A concise narrative with brief, but good analysis of the dilemmas facing the opposing commanders. Original printed and illustrated wrappers. Small corner clip to cover; overall very good. (Est. $80-100)
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405. HOOD, John Bell. (1831-79) Confederate Lt. General who led the "Texas Brigade" at Second Bull Run and Antietam, and under Longstreet Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and Chickamauga, where he lost a limb. Scarce signature "John B. Hood" and pre-war rank as Brevet Second Lieutenant of Infantry, cut from a document. A bit closely-cut, slight toning, else a very good and most affordable example. (Est. $300-400)
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406. HOOKER, Joseph. (1814-79) Union Major General known as "Fighting Joe"; led Army of the Potomac. ALS, 4pp., September 3, 1865, Astor House, to John Thompson. Interesting content, in small part: "You acted wisely in dropping your Mexican friend...The fort is impractical...New York is full of such schemes. In all of the new states and territories many work on projects...without the necessary means. Hence to go into them is risky in the extreme...I want you to take a position in the Govt...The attack you refer to comes from one of McClellan's strikers & quit the Army because he could not be promoted from his disloyalty. He was a slave owner & all his sympathies were with the South. Praise from him would bring ruin..." Mounting strip at top margin and very minor brushing of ink, otherwise very good. An example of seeking to "set the record straight" in the immediate aftermath of the war. (Est. $250-350)
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407. HOWARD, Oliver Otis. (1830-1909) Union Major General who commanded right wing of Sherman's Army in march to the sea. Fought at Gettysburg, awarded Congressional Medal of Honor having lost an arm while valiantly commanding forces at the Seven Pines. In 1865, Howard became the first Commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. Fine war-date ALS "O. O. Howard, Maj Gen.", February 7, 1864, Augusta, ME. In part: "I am perfectly willing to contribute my mite to your benevolent enterprise and through you to thank the nobile [sic] & patriotic ladies who propose to continue their efforts in behalf of the soldiers. May God bless them and their cause..." A wonderful example - no doubt a response to an appeal from a group of Sanitary Fair ladies! (Est. $150-150)
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408. INGALLS, Rufus. (1818-93) Union brigadier general, Chief Quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac. A group of three pieces including a good content war-date L.S., 4 x 6.75", "Hd. Qrs." June 14, 1864, in pencil, to the master of the vessel Spaulding. Reads in part: "...If you see any ferry boats in the James river, tell them to come to Wyler landing as rapidly as possible. If you meet any pontoons in the river... hurry them forwards..." At the time, Grant was facing Lee's forces at Cold Harbor with little success. Grant chose to shift his attack to the other side of the James river and advance on Petersburg, and on the same day this letter was sent, Grant's 450 military engineers built the famous James River Bridge in just eight hours. Mounted, otherwise very good. Together with a second penciled L.S., (but signed in ink), 5 x 8", "Headquarters Army of the Potomac", July 14, 1863 enclosing papers for a receipt of property. Very good. Together with a Brady C.D.V. bust portrait of Ingalls, in fine condition. Together, three (3) pieces. (Est. $150-180)
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409. (John D. Imboden). A good content A.L.S. of Captain Frank M. IMBODEN, the brother of Confederate General John D. Imboden, 8 x 9.5", Johnson's Island, Ohio, May 18, 1865, as a prisoner of war, to his sister on his prospect for release in light of the end of hostilities. In part: "...I hardly think soon, as no policy has yet been declared towards us...Prisoner discipline is rather as right than formerly & we are enjoying as much comfort as we could have..." Loss at left affects text; foxing and folds. Offered together with an A.L.S. by C. F Henning, 3pp. 5 x 8.25", Richmond, November 29, 1864 to John D. Imboden discussing the possibility of obtaining an exchange for his imprisoned brother. Creases, ink a bit light, else very good. Two pieces. (Est. $100-200)
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An extremely rare war-date ALS.

410. JACKSON, Thomas J. "Stonewall". (1824-63) Confederate lieutenant general who gained his nickname from his stand at Bull Run. Also served as Lee's right hand in the Seven Days. Killed at Chancellorsville where he was accidentally shot by Confederate pickets while riding between lines. Rare war date Autograph Letter Signed, November 7, 1862, to Major General D. H. Hill. A fine military letter: "Genl. Yr. dispatch of today 5 P.M. is just at hand. Please ride over to my Hd. qrs. in the morning if convenient as I feel much concerned about comfort of the men. I have no objection to the detail named. Most Respectfully T.J. Jackson Maj Genl" From the famed, early "dean" of manuscript dealers Walter Benjamin, this 8 x 2 3/4" letter appears slightly trimmed at the bottom margin, but by the way Jackson crammed the last lines to fit the sheet, this is obviously the original size. Signed just before Jackson was appointed a Lt. General. A fine and quite rare war letter.
(Est. $6,000-8,000)
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411. JONES, George W. (1804-96) Jones served as a drummer boy in the War of 1812, secured the organization of the Wisconsin and Iowa territories and served as a Representative and Senator from Iowa. A Southern sympathizer, he was appointed U.S. minister to New Granada by James Buchanan, but was recalled by the Lincoln administration and then confined as a suspected secessionist in Fort Lafayette, New York. Signed card: "Geo. W. Jones, Iowa" , accompanied by note, written for him by his daughter and undated, reading: "Dear Sir, Owing to greatly impaired sight, I am unable to write in a straight line, & I hope you will excuse the appearance..." Scarce, quite fine. (Est. $100-150)
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Autobiographical content ... and his being awarded the Medal of Honor!


412. KING, Horatio. (1837-1918) ALS, January 18, 1913, to a young relative, on letterhead reading "Horatio C. King, Temple Bar, 44 Court Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. City." King studied law with Edwin Stanton for two years before the war. He then served in the Army of the Potomac, and was later Chief Quartermaster of the First Cavalry, Army of the Shenandoah. He took part in five battles and was promoted for gallantry at the Battle of Five Forks. After the War, he practiced law in New York and was appointed Judge Advocate General in the National Guard. In 1897, King was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his service with the cavalry near Dinwiddie Courthouse, VA., on March 31, 1865. King writes, in part: "My dear young friend: I was not a `great-General' but a modest major who was brevetted colonel and received the Congressional Medal of Honor. My service for two years was with the Army of the Potomac and one with the Army of the Shenandoah Valley... I am addressed as General having been Judge Advocate General of New York." A fine example with great content. (Est. $75-100)
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Stunning war-date Robert E. Lee letter to Wade Hampton. Written after Jeb Stuart's death and Hampton's brilliant victory at Trevilian Station, when Lee promoted Hampton to be in charge of the cavalry, August of 1864.
413. LEE, Robert E. (1807-70) Lee hailed from one of the most distinguished families in Virginia. His father, "Light-Horse Harry," was a famous Revolutionary War officer, and his wife Mary Custis descended from Martha Washington. He graduated second in his class from West Point in 1829, and then worked in the engineering department. Fighting with distinction in the Mexican War, in 1859 he put down John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry. After Virginia left the Union, he cast his lot with his native state and led the Army of Northern Virginia to many victories, including Second Manassas, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. His ill-advised attack on the center of the Union line at Gettysburg stopped his invasion of the North. He finally surrendered to Grant at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, and was paroled. Lee became president of Washington College [now Washington & Lee University], which is where he died and is buried. A remarkkable letter: "Headq'r. Aug. 12 1864 Gen, Your note of this morning with reference to the assignment of certain members of your present staff to you for duty in the staff of the Cavalry Corps has been received. It will give me pleasure to gratify your wishes in the matter so far as I can do so consistently with the existing orders & regulations. It will be necessary to make application for the transfer of such as you desire so that the application in each case may be acted on & the order issued at the A & GGO Richmond. I am very respectfully, Your Ob't Serv't". The letter is signed with the typical, light Confederate gray ink "R. E. Lee, Gen'l" underneath a thumbprint, undoubtedly that of Lee himself. The 1864 battle of Trevilian Station was the Civil War's truly decisive cavalry fight, and the thrashing that Hampton gave Sheridan quite possibly extended the war another six months. After several days' fighting, Hampton gave Sheridan a check at Trevillian's Station which broke up a plan of campaign that included a junction with Hunter and the capture of Lynchburg. In twenty-three days Hampton captured over 3,000 prisoners and much materiel of war, with a loss of 719 men. He was made commander of Lee's cavalry in August, with the rank of lieutenant-general, and in September struck the rear of the federal army at City Point, bringing away 400 prisoners and 2,486 beeves. Soon afterward, in another action, he captured 500 prisoners. In one of these attacks he lost his son in battle. Beautifully housed in a custom frame, with a portrait and plaque. (Est. $10,000-12,000)
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414. LOGAN, John Alexander. "Black Jack." (1826-86) Vice Presidential running mate with James G. Blaine 1884, Illinois Senator, a distinguished Union officer who conceived the idea for Memorial Day observances which he inaugurated on May 30, 1868. After Vicksburg he commanded the Army of Tennessee, but was relieved by Gen. Sherman for his political interests and contempt for logistics. ALS, Washington, D.C., April 29, 1870, on "House of Representatives. Forty-first Congress U.S." letterhead, to J.A.J. Creswell, recommending an appointment for a constituent. A fine example. (Est. $50-80)
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415. LOGAN, Thomas M. (1840-1914) Confederate cavalryman who saw action from First Bull Run through the Richmond-Petersburg campaign where he was wounded. T.L.S. 8 x 6.25", Richmond, January 25, 1890 to H. M. Cist of Cincinnati informing him that he "will be pleased to received copies of the letter to which you refer on the battles of Chickamauga and Chattanooga if you will mail tem to me..." With two corrections in his hand. Fine. (Est. $150-200)
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James Longstreet explains his actions at the
Battle of Missionary Ridge to his uncle: "the armies seem to be quietly watching each other." A fabulous, war-date letter.
416. LONGSTREET, James. (1821-1904) Confederate major general who commanded Lee's right wing at Sharpsburg, and the left flank at Chickamauga. Accused of delaying his attack at Gettysburg, leading to Confederate defeat. Rare and very fine content war-date ALS "J. Longstreet", 4pp., May 2, 1864, from Hd.Qrs. Near Gordonsville, VA., written to his uncle, Dr. A. B. Longstreet of Columbus, GA. He writes: "My Dear Uncle, Your letter of the 11th ult. is just received. There can be no impropriety in my endorsing favorably your friends, particularly if they have served with me. My desire was to advise you that nothing would be given to me upon requests etc. A favorable endorsement by me would not, probably, prejudice ones claims, unless it appeared that I was myself interested. So you may send any applications on the part of friends for the advancement of deserving individuals, but the communications must be made by the friends of the individuals and sent to me for endorsement. In that way I will only appear in my official capacity, and not as an interested party, which I really am not. You ask me whether the move into East [Te]ennessee was made at my suggestion. It was [not] nor was it a move that would ever have entered my mind as a practicable one, if I had not heard through some of the Staff Officers of Gen. Bragg that he intended to make such a move. Upon hearing this rumor I set to work to study some means by which the move could be made with safety - And when called into council upon the matter, suggested that it might be made by concentrating the Army in a strong position behind Chickamauga and then detaching a column of twenty thousand men against Burnside in E.T. so as to make the move strong enough and rapid enough to destroy Burnside before the enemy could advance in such condition as to injure our force in Ga. I opposed the move as Gen. Bragg proposed it and as he attempted to execute it, upon the grounds that his line would be too long and too weak to be held around the enemy concentrated in his midst. That the enemy's force could be concentrated at Chattanooga and moved against any point of his line in twenty minutes, and that when he did move his (Bragg's) long and weak line must be broken, and I opposed the move into E.T. as too weak to accomplish the results hoped for. That the probabilities were that the reduction in his force would be so great that he could not hold his lines - In short I told him that the whole matter, if the move was made as it was made, would result just as it did result: In his defeat and my failure - Before leaving Chattanooga I wrote to Gen. Buckner, expressing this opinion. He happened to keep my letter, and after the battle of Mission Ridge he sent the letter back to me, as so remarkably true in my predictions as to be well worthy of preservation. I sent it to Louise to keep for me. If you wish it you are welcome to it and she will send it to you if you will mention it when next you write her. The Armies here seem to be quietly [lo]oking at each other. Neither quite [rea]dy to move I suppose. I don't know yet that we have adopted any plan or policy, except it be to wait till the enemy is entirely ready. Our troops are in fine condition and full of confidence - I sincerely hope that we may be able to destroy Grant as readily as we have the other Yankee Generals. We have never met one who has been able to stand against us yet. Give much love to Aunt and Cousins when you see them or write them. Your very affectionate Nephew, J. Longstreet." Loss to bottom left corner, small holes near the bottom, minor loss along the fold. A fascinating account of Confederate plans.
(Est. $6,000-8,000)
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417. MAHONE, William. (1826-95) Lt. Col. and Colonel of the 6th VA Infantry Regiment; promoted to Brig. General. During the Peninsular Campaign led his brigade at Seven Pines and Malvern Hill. Also fought at 2nd Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania; promoted to Major General on July 30, 1864 for his performance at the Battle of the Crater. After the war, he returned to engineering and continued to be instrumental in developing railwaya in Virginia; U.S. Senator, 1881-7. Signed Document, an Atlantic, Mississippi & Ohio Railroad Co. stock certificate, April 5, 1872 issued to J. T. Spencer for 24 shares. A bold Mahone signature. (Est. $400-600)
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The first Confederate killed in action.

418. MARR, John Quincy. (d. 1861) The first Confederate soldier (and officer) to be killed in action during the Civil War. A graduate and former faculty member of the Virginia Military Institute, Marr had been sent to the field with the Warrenton Rifles, which he had raised after John Brown's raid. Col. Richard S. Ewell stationed Marr's company at the Fairfax Courthouse, and on June 1, 1861, Company B, 2nd U.S. Cavalry passed through the town, firing a few random shots. After a defense was prepared and the Union forces driven off, it was noticed that Marr was missing. He was later found dead from a wound in the chest. Excessively rare manuscript D.S. "John Q. Marr", 1p. oblong 8vo., [n.p.], Feb. 4, 1859, a promissory note in which Marr and another gentleman promise to repay the sum of $3,000 to an estate. A 1" x 1" blank area at lower-left lacking, cross-writing affects one letter in signature, else very good (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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"Little Mac" needs the best cloth
for his new uniform...
and more room in the armpits!


419. McCLELLAN, George Brinton. (1826-85) Democratic candidate for President against Lincoln 1864, Commander of the Army of the Potomac, made General-in-Chief following Winfield Scott. Superseded by General Burnside in November,1862. Governor of New Jersey. ALS, 2pp. with integral address leaf, West Point, NY, April 5th, 1850, to John Earle of Boston. He writes: "John Earle Jr. Esq. Sir, Will you please make for me, & send to this place, one uniform frock coat, with engr. buttons, & straps of the new pattern indicating the lineal rank of a 2nd Lt. & the first grade of a Captain. I presume you have the pattern by this time. The last coat you made for me was of poor cloth & was entirely too small for me - be kind enough to make this one very loose in the neck, chest & arms, particularly in the armpits, you cannot make it much too large in the last place. I wrote to you some time since in relation to an account against one G. C. McClelland sent to me, more than once, by your agent Mr. Selding; as my own account is now paid in full to this date, by a check I sent to your address some two days since, you will greatly oblige me if you will give such directions that the mistake of sending the above mentioned individual's bill to me may not be repeated. Please make the shoulder strap to tie on, as directed in the order for the new uniform. The last coat you made for me commenced wearing white & tearing very soon after I received it; if better cloth cannot be provided for the usual price, I would prefer paying more for a good article. Your obdt. servant Geo. B. McClellan." A fine example in pristine condition. (Est. $400-600)
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420. This lot has it all! So here's how the story goes: General A.P. Hill, spurned by the lovely Miss Mary Ellen "Nelly" Marcy, carried his anger over her marrying his old West Point roommate (and commander of the Army of the Potomac!), George B. McClellan, to the battlefields of the Civil War! This incredible 7 x 8" two-sided scrapbook album page includes wonderful mementos from McClellan's 1860 wedding in NYC. It includes G.B. McClellan's and Miss Marcy's personal calling cards, six gorgeous photographic portraits of Miss Marcy, a church invitation card, newspaper clipping from the event with list of attendees (including Lt. Gen. Scott, Ex-Governor Seymour, Col. Joe Johnston & Major A.P. Hill himself! A clipping details McClellan's immediately previous duty in Russia; another clipping is about then General McClellan's nephew, Young English, fighting for the South, who "...seems to desire nothing so much as to meet in hostile combat his distinguished kinsman." The calling card of Miss Lilah Worthington is also included (possibly the owner of the scrapbook); she apparently appears in one of the photographs with Miss Marcy. A fun, quite interesting record... and great story of romance, heartache, and battle! (Est. $400-600)
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421. McDOWELL, Irwin. (1818-85) The first Union commander, in May 1861, appointed brigadier general, though he had never commanded men in battle. He was humiliated by Beauregard at First Manassas and was replaced by McClellan. He was assigned a corps of the Army of the Potomac, but his shortcomings worked against him, and he was sent west to command the Department of the Pacific. Routed at Bull Run, he was later exonerated before a board of inquiry in relation to the second battle. A set of four Documents Signed, original printed General Orders dating between August 22, 1850 and December 5, 1855, some one and others two pages, measuring 4.5 x 6.5", each signed by McDowell during his tenure as Assistant Adjutant General. Orders include a fine content set of orders from General Scott, 2p., New York, March 28, 1855 concerning operations "to be undertaken against the hostile Sioux, and for the purpose of protecting from Indian hostilities the frontiers of Kansas and Nebraska, and the emigrant routes leading from the Missouri river to the West..." Other orders regarding personal armament for artillery troops, recommendations for rifle practice, and an order to the 9th regiment to proceed, "via Panama, to San Francisco, California..." Light vertical creases, pin holes at left margins, otherwise quite bright and clean. Four (4) pieces in total. (Est. $200-300)
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422. MCDOWELL, Irvin. (1818-85) ALS, 2pp., November 7, 1871, Headquarters Dept. of the East letterhead, to Genl. Alpheus S. Williams declining an invitation from the "Committee of the Society of the Army of the Cumberland" to their Fifth Reunion: "obliged to deny myself this pleasure...your Society is connected in my mind with one of my oldest and best friends your... Commander Genl. Geo H Thomas..." Mounting traces at margin of verso (no affect),
otherwise a lovely example.
(Est. $80-120)
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"Only an Irishman...
can appreciate and understand Paddy."
423. McQUADE, James. (1829-84) Brevet Brigadier General in the 14th New York Infantry. Interesting political content A.L.S. 2pp. 5 x 8", Utica, N.Y., July 15, 1872 to New York governor John T. Hoffman discussing his candidacy and the Irish vote and the need for him to not run for re-election. He writes: "I don't find that the well-informed people have an idea that you would lose much of the Irishman, or one with Irish blood in his veins, can appreciate and understand Paddy. Those who think you will be hurt materially by the Irish vote are of two classes -- the people who know nothing about it, and those who want somebody else nominated. While I have no doubt you would lose some Irish votes I am sure that they would be more than compensated by the scattering Republican vote you would receive from those who approve [of] your administration. My father, who is a pretty shrewd observer of political affairs, and conversant with the currents of public opinion, thinks that you would not lose a great many Irish votes, and that if you did you would 'have plenty without them.' Kernan[?] proposes not to be a candidate, but I am not certain that he is sincere. You can't always tell about Kernan. His name it is Frank, but the name doesn't strike in to any extent. His son, with whom I talked yesterday, doesn't know anything about it. Spriggs, however, who is a pretty good indicator of the Kernan mind, says that he 'thinks, on the whole Frank is the best man to take Hoffman's place. Hoffman, had better announce that he is not a candidate and relieve the matter of all complication...' I suppose that it may seem to some of these gentleman that, after all this blathering about the 12 of July, if you should decline to become a candidate it wouldn't do to put a Catholic, or Irish blood, in your place..." Hoffman, by then ruined politically by his connections to the Tweed Ring, did not stand for re-election. Neatly laid into a lager sheet, usual folds, othewise fine. (Est. $100-300)
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424. MEADE, George G. (1815-72) Union major general who commanded brilliantly at Gettysburg, leading to a Union victory and the turning point of the Civil War. A fine S.P. "Geo. G. Meade", a carte-de-visite photograph bearing a sepia 3/4 length image of Meade in uniform. Boldly signed on mount with a "F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia" backstamp with a tax stamp dated Nov 23, 1864. This photograph was likely taken in the Autumn of 1864 when Meade took a short leave of absence to visit his home. Photograph slightly buckled from mount at top and bottom due to a lack of adhesive, small nick along bottom portion of photo, otherwise very good condition. (Est. $1,500-1,800)
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425. MORRIS, William H. (1827-1900) Union general on reserve at Gettysburg, wounded at Spotsylvania. A.L.S. 5 x 8", Fordham, [NY], April 29, 1898 on personal matters. Laid into a larger sheet, boldly penned, an excellent example. (Est. $50-75)
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426. NICHOLLS, Francis Reddin Tillou. (1834-1912) Confederate brigadier-general, raised the Phoenix guards, served at First Bull Run, lost an arm at Winchester, later lost a foot at Chancellorsville. Partly-printed endorsement as Governor of Louisiana on the verso of a partly-printed treasury bond for $100, 1877. Usual folds, otherwise very good. (Est. $60-80)
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The only signed portrait of General John Strong Platner extant.
427. PLATNER, John Strong. (1837-68) Carte photograph from Plumb Gallery in Washington, D.C., inscribed "Fraternally yours, J.S. Platner, Maj. 33rd NYV." Platner enlisted May 1, 1861 at the age of 24 from his home at Geneva, NY as a Captain, Platner was commissioned into "H" Co. NY 33rd Infantry. In 1863 he was commissioned into Field & Staff NY 1st Vet Cavalry. His promotions included: Major 1/24/1862; Lt Col 9/18/1863 (as of 1st NY Veteran Cavalry); Colonel 12/13/1864; Brig-Gen 3/13/1865 by Brevet. Helping command troops with the NY 33rd, the "Ontario Regiment," Platner and his men built up Forts Ethan Allen and Marcy. The 3d brigade, under command of Gen. Davidson, then moved to Manassas; then embarked for the Peninsula. In the siege of Yorktown the regiment was active. It encountered the enemy at Lee's Mill; participated in the battles of Williamsburg, Mechanicsville, and the Seven Days' fighting from Gaines' Mill to Malvern Hill; encamped at Harrison's Landing. They took part in the Maryland campaign; at Antietam the regiment displayed exceptional gallantry. They saw action throughout Maryland, joined the "Mud March" in 1863, and returned to winter at White Oak Church. In the battle of Chancellorsville, the regiment belonged to the light brigade and suffered great losses. Redeployed as a Lt. Col. with the NY 1st Cavalry, Platner served in the Dept. of Washington. Their first battle occurred at Upperville, in Feb., 1864. Continuous hard service followed, the regiment being actively engaged at Woodstock, Newtown, New Market, and numerous other locales. Under command of Col. Platner, the regiment mustered out at Camp Piatt, W. Va., July 20, 1865. An exceptional piece from a man who saw a great deal of combat. (Est. $300-500)
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428. PORTER, Fitz John. (1822-1901) Union Major General, led 5th Corps; later court-martialed for failure to follow orders at 2nd Battle of Bull Run. ALS, April 20 (1893), New York, to his old comrade Col. Nathan Appleton. In part, "As a substitute for our faithful and loved comrade Gen. Locke, I have designated another good comrade - Col. A M Clark as Acting Secretary and Treasurer of the 5th Corps Society... asked him to attend to... our business operations at Boston for our next meeting..." Docketed at corner "Meeting of the Society of the Army of the Potomac, Boston, June 27-28, 1893." Minor mounting traces on verso, otherwise very good. Appleton (1843-1906) fought with the 5th and, at the time this letter was received from his old commander, ran Boston's G.A.R. Post #113. (Est. $100-150)
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429. PRYOR, Roger. Served with Robert E. Lee at Harpers Ferry. LS, 3 West 69th [NY], 2pp., August 31,1915. An interesting letter written for Pryor then signed by him about his role at Harpers Ferry. In full: "My Dear Sir, My father, Judge Pryor, not being well enough to write, I have acted as his amannensis [sic], furnishing at his dictation the facts you ask. It has given him pleasure to comply with your request. Yours sincerely, M.G.P. Rice [Pryor's daughter]. The letter signed by Pryor states: "General Robert E. Lee commanded the forces opposed to John Brown in 1859. Serving under him as a volunteer I first met him at Harpers Ferry Virginia upon that occasion. I was during the Civil War Colonel of the Third Virginia Regiment, and was promoted to Brigadier General in 1863..." A very nice association item from an eyewitness. (Est. $200-300)
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The old general comments on political affairs related to the upcoming presidential election: "...Democrats do insist so much on the adoption of the issue of one seven year term for the Presidency..."
430. ROSECRANS, William S. (1819-98) Union Major General; Chief of the Army of the Cumberland at Stones River, Tullahoma & Chickamauga. ALS, signed "W.S. Rosecrans", 4 separate pages, July 11, 1880, 4to, San Francisco, to General Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-86), with excellent political content. In small part: "...of those elected ardent minds which can never be content to see the popular government running in the grooves of hopeless and helpless machines and mismanagement...Before Hayes was thought of for the Presidency I spent three hours in persuading him that rotation in office for spoils was the evil which convenes over all others... Democrats do insist so much on the adoption of the issue of one seven year term for the Presidency..." Much more. Written in purple fountain ink, which has "feathered" in places throughout the letter and signature, but all writing is still legible. Uneven toning to first page else quite a fine example. (Est. $100-200)
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431. SHALER, Alexander. (1827-1911) Union brigadier general fought in every important battle with the Army of the Potomac including Sharpsburg, Malvern Hill and Gettysburg. During 1863, he was in charge of the Confederate prison on Johnson's Island, but returned for the battle of the Wilderness where he was captured. He was likely the only officer who commanded a Union stockade for Confederate prisoners who later became a prisoner himself. He was exchanged and later served in Arkansas. ALS, October 17, 1870, "Head Quarters 1st Division," to Col. Poore, in part: "Unfortunately, my engagements were so numerous during the time you were in the city that I barely succeeded in finding time to meet the Mayor at the St. Nicholas to review you as you passed on your way to the boat.." Neatly tipped to larger sheet, quite fine. (Est. $80-120)
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Sheridan instructs General Hancock to send President Arthur to New Jersey!
(Not a fate we would wish on many!)


432. SHERIDAN, Philip H. (1831-88) Union Major General; commanded at Chickamauga, Chattanooga; led Army of the Shenandoah; cut off the final Confederate retreat at Appomattox. A famous Indian fighter, Sheridan's fighting prowess was evident throughout the war: from Booneville to the elimination of J.E.B. Stuart at Yellow Tavern. ALS "P H Sheridan," 3pp., August 21, 1884, Headquarters Army of the U.S. letterhead, Washington, to Gen Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-86). In part: "I want to inspect the public buildings at Fort Hamilton on Monday morning & would like to have Mr. Chester A. Arthur sent to the Jersey City depot for the 6:30 train..." Some light soiling, vertical fold, otherwise very good. At this time, Sheridan was commander-in-chief of the Army and, of course, reported directly to Chester A. Arthur, President of the U.S. Fun association! (Est. $200-300)
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433. SHERIDAN, Philip. (1831-88) Union major general of cavalry and famous Indian fighter. Sheridan's fighting prowess was evident throughout the war, from Booneville to Chickamauga and the elimination of J.E.B. Stuart at Yellow Tavern. Pristine Signed Calling Card. A lovely specimen. (Est. $150-200)
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Sherman sends a terse war-dated letter to future General John Starkweather. This comes only five days after he was superseded in the Dept. of the Ohio by Buell, under a cloud of insanity.
434. SHERMAN, William T. (1820-91) Union major general declared by the press to be "insane," he led his army in their March to the Sea, taking Atlanta, Savannah and Columbia along the way. War-date ALS, November 14, 1861, in full: "Col. John C. Starkweather Sir, I authorize you to recruit your regiment up to the standard provided you enlist onlyl persons who have already served and that they should come embodied in not less than fifty men. W. T. Sherman Brig. Gen. Comd." The new Department of the Ohio, which replaced those of Ohio and the Cumberland, consisted of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and Tennessee, and Kentucky east of the Cumberland River. Command was given to Brig. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, who superseded Sherman. The job had proved too great a nervous strain for Sherman, who departed under a cloud with even his sanity questioned. Buell was thought to be a stalwart, firm and able soldier. A great example. (Est. $2,500-3,000)
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Sherman's "large collection of photographs..."
435. SHERMAN, William Tecumseh. ALS, 3pp., April 4, 1890, New York. In part: "Dear Hammond, Your letter was received some days ago. And I have searched in my large collection of photographs for the one you speak of, is of my personal and official staff about the time of Shiloh and Vicksburg. Therefore I will be obliged for one of your spare copies...You have always inclined to underestimate your strength in evidence of which you have outlasted hundreds and thousands of your comrades who were rugged, strong and confident of long life. I surely think the same of myself... I [am] living while Grant, Sheridan, Thomas, Logan and hundreds of others physically stronger than me... are dead. The simple fact that you have earned since the war a fair competency for your wife and children will surely add to your days unless you hasten the end by unnecessary worry and fret. I am quite well only overtaxed by social demands on my time. Still it is better to wear out than to rush out..." Much more. Together with the photograph detailed in the letter, an Imperial Card by Marceau Bellsmith of Cincinnati. Water stain to the right of Sherman, somewhat light. A fine letter. (Est. $1,500-1,800)
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Duelist with Lincoln... and General.
436. SHIELDS, James. (1806-79) Challenged Lincoln to a duel in retaliation for Lincoln's "Rebecca" letter in which he described Shields as "a conceity dunce." Another "Rebecca" letter, written by Mary Todd and Julia Jayne, drove Shields to seek restoration to his honor. Lincoln accepted the challenge but chose, instead of pistols, to fight with "Cavalry broad swords of the largest size." Fortunately, seconds finessed an understanding and the fight was called off. Lincoln appointed Shields a brigadier general during the War. Autograph Letter Signed, Washington, February 14, 1859, to Gustavus Henderson of Baltimore. "Dear Sir, I take great pleasure in complying with your flattering request to send you my autograph to be placed amongst names that have shed so much lustre on their country. My fear is that my poor name will be out of place in such a brilliant collection." Mounting remnants on verso slightly bleed through to front, otherwise very fine.
(Est. $200-300)
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437. SLIDELL, John. (1793-1871) U.S. Senator from Louisiana, Slidell was appointed Ambassador to France by the Confederacy and was subsequently captured by the Union aboard the British steamer Trent with James Mason, Minister to England (known as the "Trent Affair"). Questionable under international law, the capture almost resulted in war between England and the U.S. ALS, spindle hole cancellation at center. He writes in the third person, in part: "Mr. Slidell wished first volume of Cicero...also the volume containing the letter to Atticus..." Light bleed, signature quite bold, fine. (Est. $80-120)
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438. [GROUP] A rare collection of four war-date D.S. "G. W. Smith" adding rank as major general, being official military telegrams addressed to Generals Robert E. Lee, Samuel French, and W. H. C. Whiting. These documents come directly from Smith's retained copy ledger and are all inscribed on one larger folio sheet, Richmond, Va. Dec 13, 1862. Each telegram is actually signed by Smith making its transmission official. The content varies, including troop movements in the Carolinas, an attack at Kingston, N. C., and a possible assault to Petersburg, VA. A rare look, behind the scenes, at routine Confederate military operations. Right hand margin on the verso is closely cut, negligibly affecting the content, else very good. Interesting content, fine documents. (Est. $300-500)
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JEB Stuart writes to a soldier's
mother... getting her son transferred to obtain proper medical training.
A rare, war-date letter.


439. STUART, James E.B. (1833-64) Confederate major general of cavalry, led a daring reconnaissance on McClellan's forces, riding around the entire army. Later turned up late at Gettysburg leaving Lee "blind." He was mortally wounded at Yellow Tavern. Rare war-date Autograph Letter Signed, 2pp., March 2, 1863, on stationery with embossed shield bearing the inscription "R&H." The letter, 5 x 8", is written from "Hd Qrs Cav Div: A of N. VA." to the mother of one of his soldiers seeking to have her son sent to Hanover, VA for medical training. "My Dear Madam, Your favor of Friday 24th was duly recd. and I have given its subject prompt attention, but no records can be found of any such case having been submitted here. It must have miscarried. My division surgeon to whom I showed your letter says he will make inquiry about your son and if worthy will have him detailed for hospital duty at the Coleman Institute in Hanover, where his opportunities for study will be better & his expenses less than at Richmond. In the abstract, I am opposed to such details, but there are special cases which justify it. I have but one motive in these matters and that is duty to our country, which I know you will recognize as paramount to everything else. Most Respectfully & Truly Yours J.E.B. Stuart Major Genl." An elegant letter with fabulous content. (Est. $6,000-8,000)
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The future "Rock of Chickamagua" goes public to complain about a promotion!
440. THOMAS, George H. (1816-70) Union major general who commanded forces at Chickamauga, Shiloh, Atlanta and Franklin. A unique piece of history: a four-page circular, "Letter. Washington City, June 10, 1860," signed on last page "G. H. Thomas. A. Q. M. Gen.; U.S.A." In this letter, Thomas publicizes his concern over the possible loss of a promotion: "I now ask to be promoted to that rank, made vacant by the death of my late friend and chief, General Jesup. That I have a right to ask for it will be seen by the foregoing statement. I consider it my legal right; yet, should I be seen in error on this point, I claim it as having earned it by my service and rank in the army." Some folds, but generally in very fine condition with a crisp and bold signature. Possibly a unique specimen as we can source no other example - quite an important discovery! (Est. $600-800)
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441. (THOMAS, George H.) 3.5 x 2.5" card for the official funeral services honoring the "Rock of Chickamagua." A rare, interesting piece of ephemera. (Est. $100-200)
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442. TRACY, Edward Dorr. (1833-63) Confederate brigadier general who fought at First Bull Run and later served in Wheeler's 19th Alabama. Tracy served in Eastern Tennessee prior to participating in the Vicksburg campaign, where he was mortally wounded at Port Gibson. His scarce signature "Edward D. Tracy" on closely cut slip removed from an envelope. Cancellation affects "Tracy." Very light soiling, else very good condition. (Est. $150-300)
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443. VEATCH, James C. (1819-1895), Union Brig. Gen. of Vols.; fought at Shiloh and Mobile; led a division in the deep south; early investigator of Indiana Lincoln lore. Handsome document, signed and partially filled out by Veatch, New Albany, Ind., 1877. A $25 U.S. tax stamp for a retail liquor dealer; on pale yellow paper with nice vignette of Bacchus, still and wine jug at top; Internal Revenue seal and underprinted year date in red. Unissued; two small hole cancels clear of writing; very fine. Veatch published The Herald newspaper at Rockport, Ind., near Lincoln's boyhood home, and likely first met him in 1844 during his sole return visit, as a campaigner for Henry Clay. In 1861 Veatch led the committee which welcomed Lincoln's inaugural train to Indiana and had a long reminiscent talk with him. When the neglected grave of Lincoln's mother Nancy was finally marked in 1879, Veatch led a drive to put an iron fence around the site and personally helped install it. Colorful and great for display. (Est. $60-80)
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A rare, Confederate Cavalry Corps Broadside.

444. [WHEELER, Joseph.] West Point trained Wheeler (Fighting Joe) started the war as a 2nd Lieutenant and rose to Major General in only 21 months at the age of 26. He was a professional and disciple of the Academy's scientific theory of war that eschewed romanticism and taught mastering the complexities of the battlefield. He fought at Shiloh as Colonel of the 19th AL and soon lead the cavalry corps of the Army of Tennessee. "Fighting Joe" commanded the cavalry corps until near the end of the war when he was superseded by Wade Hampton. Fascinating 3 1/2 x 10 1/2" printed, circular-broadside, from Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler and signed in type by his adjutant, Maj. D.G. Reed, datelined at "Head Quarters Wheeler's Cavalry Corps, June 3rd, 1863. General Orders No. 7." The General Order reminds cavalry officers that "The commanding General of this Army relies solely upon information received from Cavalry, to make his dispositions and inaccuracies in their reports may entail great disasters." The orders also discuss what is expected of cavalry in the field noting "Calvary Officers and Soldiers must always remember that they are the eyes and ears of the General commanding..." These orders were circulated in the lead-up to the Tullahoma (Middle Tennessee) Campaign intended to prevent Confederate reinforcements from aiding besieged Vicksburg. (Est. $800-1,000)
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445. WICKHAM, William C. (1820-88) Confederate cavalryman present First Bull Run, wounded at Williamsburg. Also present at Second Bull Run, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Fredericksburg. Partly-printed D.S., 3.75 x 2.25", 1877, a free pass to ride on the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad valid through January 1, 1878. Fine and extremely rare. (Est. $200-300)
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446. WRIGHT, Horatio G. (1820-99). Union Maj. Gen. who led fighting at Gettysburg, Spotsylvania (where wounded) and Appomattox. After the war, he was Engineer of the Army and was buried directly in front of the Lee home at Arlington - which he helped seize early in the war. ALS, 3pp., Washington, May 11, 1880, "Office of the Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army," to T. A. Actin on an invitation to the Union League Club; Wright declines: "It would afford me much pleasure to meet on the occasion referred to the gentlemen of the club who acted so important a part in sustaining the effects of the nation to put down the Rebellion, but unfortunately my duties are such as to preclude my being present at the time fixed for the dinner..." Excellent. (Est. $75-100)
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An interesting Union Naval document.
The final request before the Tecumseh sank to the bottom of Mobile Bay in the engagement that inspired the directive
"Damn the torpedoes!"



447. Offered is one of the last documents signed by Captain T.A.M. Craven before he died with most of his crew of 141 men when the USS Tecumseh broke from formation to attack the Confederate ironclad ram Tennessee, was hit by a torpedo and capsized... quickly plunging bow first to the bottom of Mobile Bay. This historic manuscript is one page, 8 x12", written and signed by John Faron, Chief Engineer of the Tecumseh, July 29, 1864, from Pensacola. The missive is a formal request for iron spikes and machinists to execute repairs to deck plates of the Union Ironclad, with approval signatures of both Tunis A.M. Craven, Captain of the ship and Commodore William W. Smith, in command of the Navy Yard at Pensacola. On the verso is a docket by J.W. Whittaker, Chief Engineer at the Navy Yard, certifying the signatures and stating, "the last requistion signed by Chief Engineer Faron before the Tecumseh was blown up Aug. 5/64 Mobile Bay." These repairs were made just seven days before this famous Civil War Naval encounter at Mobile Bay, when Union battle plans went awry. Com. Farragut, directing the engagement, nonetheless felt he still had the initiative and gave his famous order to "Damn the torpedoes!" The rest of the fleet charged forward. This historic Naval item comes with a copy of the magazine Blue & Gray, June 12, 2002 relating "The Battle of Mobile Bay." Cleanly separated at integral folds but easily repaired, a remarkable piece of history! (Est. $400-600)
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Rare Civil War Signature from the
Baltimore Riots.
448. Offered is a bold signature of George (Marshal) Kane penned on an official check from the Comptroller of Baltimore City. The blue check is dated Dec. 6th 1877. Kane was head of the Police force in Baltimore in April 1861 when the famous "first blood" of the Civil War was shed. The Union 6th Mass. was being sent to Washington via Baltimore when the citizens attacked the Union soldiers resulting in numerous casualties on both sides. This would be known as the Baltimore Riot. Marshal George P. Kane, head of the Baltimore City Police, with about fifty policeman rushed in behind the troops and formed a line to protect them. Ironically Kane was a secessionist. Two of his sons would later join Mosby's Rangers, and he would eventually be arrested because of his political views. But as a policeman Kane saw it as his duty to protect these troops even though they opposed his own personal beliefs. Later Kane was sent to see the Governor, who was staying at Mayor Brown's home. Kane informed Governor Hicks that within a few short hours a large body of troops, no doubt aware of the day's events and inflamed with resentment, would enter Baltimore. The Governor, though he would later deny it, supposedly gave his permission to burn the railroad bridges of the North Central and Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroads, effectively cutting Baltimore off from the North. Kane realized that burning the bridges was not enough to stop Federal troops from passing through the city. If Baltimore was to become the focal point of Federal troops passing through the state to the District of Columbia, then Baltimore needed a strong military presence in the city to keep order and to deter Federal troops from occupying it. To this end Kane contacted several of the militia units scattered throughout the state. One such militia unit, the Frederick Company, was commanded by Captain Bradley T. Johnson, a local lawyer and politician. Johnson had several days before offered his assistance to Kane. Kane wired Johnson: "Streets red with Maryland blood. Send expresses over the mountains of Maryland and Virginia for the riflemen to come without delay." Within a month of the riots, Johnson and most of his men would be at Harper's Ferry organizing what became the 1st Maryland Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A. (Est. $200-400)
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For some reason - despite a long life -
a very scarce Maryland CSA autograph.
449. HOWARD, McHenry. (1838-1923) Signed Document, a receipt with bold signature for expenses incurred as an election judge in the Baltimore elections of 1880. The document is dated Nov. 3 1880 and addressed to the Mayor and City Council, 7x 8". Howard was a Marylander who, at the outbreak of the war, hurried south and joined Johnston's army at Bull Run. Subsequently he fought through the whole war, serving as a staff officer to Jackson, Stuart and Lee. He was taken by the Federals and held for a time as a POW on Johnson's Island in Lake Erie. His family has a long famous history in Baltimore, Maryland. A fine Civil War - and political - item. (Est. $200-400)
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Rare and significant Baltimore Riot work...
Signed by the author, that city's Mayor, who tried to calm events during the first carnage of the war.
450. Offered is a very rare first edition of Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861, by George William Brown. Published in 1887 in Baltimore by N. Murray, agent for Johns Hopkins University (printer Isaac Friedenwald), the book has been inscribed to "N. Murray with the kind regards of Geo. Wm. Brown Nov. 5 /87." Brown was the Mayor of Baltimore City during this famous first event of the Civil War. The book relates his personal account of this important historical event. In April 1861 clouds of war hung over the nation. Soon Fort Sumter would be fired on, giving rise to the "official" beginning of the Civil War. Before this first encounter, the real start of the Civil War occurred on April 19, 1861 between Massachusetts Union soldiers and Southern sympathizer civilians in the City of Baltimore. Numerous were killed and injured on both sides. This book apparently was one of the first copies to be printed as it was signed to Murray. The hardback book is in good condition except that the front binding is slightly separated. The front cover has beautiful gold leaf for the title, author etc. The only autographed copy we can source... a seldom offered book. (Est. $600-800)
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451. (Jefferson Davis). A group of four original printed General Orders, each signed in ink by Adjutant General Samuel Cooper, 23pp. total, 4.25 x 6.5", Washington, dating between November 7, 1853 and August 28, 1854, each bearing messages from then Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis. Subjects range from the organization of the Pay Department to a very involved statement discussing the issue of enlisting aliens and minors into the Army. This was an issue that would figure heavily during the Civil War when recent immigrants (notably the Irish) would make up a significant portion of the ranks of the Union Army. Pin holes at left margins, otherwise mostly bright and clean. Four (4) documents in total, quite fine pre-war military content. (Est. $200-300)
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CLICK HERE FOR PART I (Lots 306-386)
   

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