BLACK AMERICANA


[A reminder of what the War -in part- was fought for: important, and vital African-American history. The first African slaves in America were sold in Jamestown in August 1619, a year before the Pilgrims arrived. Slavery quickly spread throughout Virginia, gained legal recognition, and became the assumed status for all Blacks. Elaborate codes were established to maintain slavery - including laws about marriage, ownership and parenthood. By the time of the Revolution, there were a half-million slaves in America and although some Southerners (such as Jefferson) spoke out against the institution, it was firmly entrenched in the economy. In the early 1800s, Northern abolition groups began to form and in 1817, the American Colonization Society was founded with the intent to send freedmen back to Africa. A few slave revolts, most notably Nat Turner's in 1831, virtually eliminated all opposition to slavery in the South. Attitudes towards slavery in the North and South hardened in the decades before the Civil War, despite the Missouri Compromise, the Compromise of 1850, and Kansas-Nebraska Act. "Bleeding Kansas" and John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry showed the violence people would employ over the practice. On January 1, 1863, Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, outlawing slavery in areas under rebellion and in December 1865, the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment officially ended slavery in America.]

A remarkable piece of history: perhaps the earliest miscegenation broadside extant. William Seward runs for office, prompting this large, graphic example of "playing the race card" in politics... EXACTLY 150 years before the infamous Willie Horton ad.

863. Fascinating anti-Whig broadside, 13 x 21", from the 1838 election in Rochester, New York in which attacks are leveled against the Whigs and one candidate in particular. Luther Bradish (1783-1863), passionate abolitionist, Lt. Governor of New York, 1835-42; candidate for Governor of New York, is taken to task for proclaiming "I think there should be no distinction on account of complexion." Blatantly racist, the broadside is an attempt to parody the Whigs with an illustration of a well-dressed Black man walking arm-in-arm with a White woman who caresses his face. On either side of the illustration appear the names of the Whig candidates and their prospective offices: "For de Gobenor, William H. Seward. For de Lieutenant Gobenor, Luther Bradish...For de Assembly, (without color)..." Below, the text states, in part, "De appeal to de White Whig Niggers ob Rochester. Bredderin...Come up to de poll and let us embrace... It may make ye a little sqeemish at fust, but ye must put aside all de personal priddledictions and go for de glorious and mighty cause ob de Niggerhood... If ye tink de Nigger breath too strong, put de Burgundy Pitch Plaster on yer noses..." The broadside was not effective as both William H. Seward and Bradish were elected to office. (The Whig party enjoyed national success in 1840 with William Henry Harrison beating Democrat Martin Van Buren for the Presidency.) This is an incredible piece of American history. Remember, a similar "ad" appealing to a specific voter "sensibility" was produced for the George Bush campaign in 1988 - the infamous "Willie Horton ad." Bush's opponent, Michael Dukakis, as Governor of Massachusetts, had signed a routine weekend furlough for a convict named Willie Horton, who spent his weekend raping and murdering. The TV ad featured a montage of images: the face of Willie Horton in a brooding, scowling stare, images of street violence, and film of men dressed in prison blues walking through a revolving door. In a spark of genius, the producers of the ad used a cut-away, overhead view of the revolving door. How little things change in American politics! Very light foxing, small water stain on right side, archivally conserved and backed with Japanese tissue. Housed in a period gold frame (sent without glass) 17 3/4 x 26" overall. A fantastic item. (Est. $15,000-18,000 )
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Celebrating Emancipation in Maryland and the contribution of Colored troops
in the field... a masterpiece of Black Americana.


864. God Save the Republic. Never in Field or Tent Scorn a Black Regiment... View of Transparency. Large folio leaf, folded to form four pages, with the first page dominated by a color lithographed representation of a transparency exhibited in Philadelphia; expert repairs along the central vertical fold and at scattered spots along the edges. (Philadelphia: Rigwalt and Brown, 1864.) Issued to celebrate Emancipation in Maryland, which took place on November 1, 1864. The lithographed image shows a cut-away view of the front of a building on Chestnut Street in Philadelphia where Colored troops were enlisted - headquarters of the Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments. The front has various tableaus of Black America, including Blacks fighting rebel forces. Within the transparency are vignettes of Colored troops in battle, slaves on the auction block, etc. The accompanying text includes George Boker's poem "The Black Regiment," and various quotes from John Quincy Adams, Andrew Johnson, and others. OCLC locates a single copy at the University of Illinois. The only other example known sold almost two years ago at Swann's for $5,000. This beautifully colored broadside presents it all! An incredible work of art. ($4,000-6,000 )
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"Men of Color, To Arms! Now or Never!"


865. A fascinating circular, 8 x 10", mounted at edges to a slightly larger sheet, calling for "Men of Color, To Arms! Now or Never!" This important piece calls for every "Able-Bodied Colored Man to enter the Army for the Three Year's Service, and join in fighting the Battles of Liberty and the Union." It goes on to say " We have seen what Valor and Heroism our brothers displayed at Port Hudson and at Milliken's Bend...Are Freemen Less Brave than Slaves?...If we are not lower in the scale of humanity than Englishmen, Irishmen, white Americans and other races, we can show it now." At the bottom is a list of famous black ministers and abolitionists supporting the call. This Black recruitment handbill from Philadelphia is similar in content and wording to a large broadside that we reported on a few years back. It is signed in type by fifty-five civic leaders including Frederick Douglass. That noted abolitionist was a strong advocate of emancipation and using former slaves and freemen as combat troops. He pushed this agenda on President Lincoln at every opportunity. The theme of this rare document is that free Blacks can earn respect and liberty for their race by enlisting for three years' service in the army. The appeal is strongly worded, impassioned and stirring: "For generations we have suffered under the horrors of slavery, our spirits cowed and crushed, and hopes of the future of our race involved in doubt and darkness. But now the whole aspect of our relations to the white race is changed. Now therefore is our most precious moment. Let us Rush to Arms! Fail Now and Our Race is Doomed on this the soil of our birth... Our enemies have made the country believe we are craven cowards, without soul, without manhood, without the spirit of soldiers. Shall we die with this stigma resting on our graves? No! A thousand times No! We WILL Rise!... We have seen what Valor and Heroism our brothers displayed at Port Hudson and at Milliken's Bend; though they are just from the galling, poisoning grasp of slavery, they have startled the world by the most exalted heroism. If they have proved themselves heroes, can we not prove ourselves men? Are Freemen Less Brave Than Slaves?... Men of Color! Brothers and Fathers! We Appeal to You! ...by all your desire for Citizenship and Equality before the law, by all your love for the Country, to stop at no subterfuge, listen to nothing that shall deter you from rallying to the Army..." This appeal was quite successful, with Black troops distinguishing themselves in battle - notably at Fort Wagner - and turning the tide of war for the Union. Unfortunately, the recognition and the reward they earned (and rightfully expected) was not forthcoming in the peace that followed. Very fine, one institutional copy found. (Est. $500-750 )
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866. C.S.A. concern for "abducted slaves." An official broadside/circular approved in August 1861 by the Congress of the Confederate States calling for slave holders to give testimony to Confederate courts in cases of "Slaves Abducted or Harbored by the Enemy, and of other Property Seized, Wasted, or Destroyed by them." The circular prescribes, in detail, how slave holders are to record the loss of their slaves. Interestingly, the last part of the circular makes clear that the act "shall not be construed as implying that the Confederate States are in any way liable to make compensation." Very fine. (Est. $200-300 )
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867. DOUGLASS, Frederick. (1817-95) Black-American reformer born a slave, instrumental in the creation of the Union Negro regiments which fough with great distinction during the War. Partially Printed Document Signed as Recorder of Deeds, Washington, D.C., July 15, 1881. A choice example with a bold signature. (Est. $300-500 )
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868. DOUGLASS, Frederick. Another D.S. as Recorder of Deeds, this a manuscript document, Washington, June 18, 1881. Another fine example with a bold signature. (Est. $300-500 )
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869. Extremely rare cabinet card photograph of the great Frederick Douglass. On mount by J.H. Kent of Rochester, circa 1880, one of but a few known to remain extant. The contrast is a bit light as made, typical of these 1880 cards; two small mounting rubs on verso, a few, tiny fly-specks, exceptional detail and depth. A difficult item to source. (Est. $1,500-2,500 )
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870. (Booker T. Washington) A pristine cabinet card of a young Booker T. Washington. Photograph by Rockwood of New York with his imprint. Washington (1859-1915) was born a slave, worked his way through school as a janitor, and rose to be chosen as the first principal of Tuskegee Institute, a Black normal and agricultural school. He spent the rest of his life promoting goodwill, giving speeches and raising funds for the school, concluding his public life with his landmark autobiography Up From Slavery. Last year we offered a similar card from a different sitting - the first we had ever seen up to that point. (That example sold for $2,660 plus buyer's.) This is now the second period portrait we have seen... an exceptional rarity of great significance. Pristine save for one tiny tack hole at top edge of mount. (Est. $1,500-2,500 )
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871. The FIRST Black Senator; a RARE photograph and great portrait by Mathew Brady - a cabinet card photograph of Hiram Rhoades Revels (1822-1901). Of mixed African and Indian descent, he was a Methodist minister and later the first Black Senator (Mississippi) during Reconstruction, later the President of Alcorn University. Photographer's imprint on front and verso, inconsequential mark in field, stunning contrast and presentation. An exceptionally rare and fine portrait. (Est. $800-1,200 )
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"The Colored Division also charged but didn't make much of it..."

872. Wonderful content ALS, 3pp., "North banks of the James River," August 18 (64), from Sgt. Irwin A. Spencer to his father... written the same day Grant crosses the James to attack Petersburg! In part: "It was rumored last night and this morning that Petersburg was ours but don't know as it is true. There is only the 2nd and 10th Corps this side of the river and I cannot conceive what is Grant's plan in keeping us here... we are not building any works or building anything at all... the 6th Corps lost heavily... the Connecticut regiments... made a charge and captured three lines of works, but were flanked and compelled to retire as they had no support. The Colored Division also charged, but didn't make much of it... all of their officers run. The same was the case at Petersburg with 9th Corps blacks three weeks ago. It seems the men would do well if they were properly officered. Such is the case all through the whole Army... blacks and whites. We are meeting with disaster after disaster because of the incompetence of officers. One of our divisions and a brigade of cavalry on the extreme right met with a repulse ...and lost heavily. But we have gained much... although lost heavily in killed and wounded. Our lines extend to... within 4 miles of Richmond. But it is nearly as much of a wilderness here as around Spotsylvania. We are about three miles from the river. There is very severe cannonading day and night on our left. I think it is near Bermuda Hundred or Dutch Gap.... The 29th Conn. came and joined 10th Army Corps last night..." Additional content about a military trial, Spencer's recovered health, and camp life. Spencer enlisted July 28, 1862 as a corporal with the Connecticut 14th Infantry mustering into F Company. He was wounded severely at Fredericksburg in 1862 and subsequently promoted twice. He was taken prisoner in August 1864 at Reams' Station, VA. The Connecticut 14th was part of the Maryland campaign and took heavy losses near the "Sunken Road" at Antietam. It also saw action during the Chancellorsville campaign and helped repulse Longstreet's charge at Gettysburg. This letter was written as Grant prepared for the siege of Petersburg, ultimately leading to the fall of Richmond. Minor age, two ink stains, overall extremely legible with fabulous insight and historical content. (Est. $300-500 )

"...We both hate Slavery & love Peace..."

873. SUMNER, Charles. (1811-74) Senator, strident abolitionist, intimate of Lincoln White House, a courtier to Mary Todd. Sumner, of course, was almost beaten to death on the floor of the House by Rep. Preston "Bully" Brooks to avenge the honor of his kinsman, Andrew Butler, Democratic Senator of South Carolina, slighted in a speech by Sumner. Good content ALS, Boston, Oct. 27, 1861 to fellow abolitionist Jonathan P. Blanchard (1811-92): "My dear Sir, I always read you writings with interest & sympathy. We are both arriving at the same results; for we both hate Slavery & love Peace..." Usual folds, a few contemporary smudges, else fine. (Est. $250-400 )
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874. Dividend check from the Office of the Commissioners of the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company, paying twenty-five cents to a E. Morgan Thomas on March 20, 1878. 3 1/2 x 8" with a lovely vignette of Lincoln on blue paper, boldly signed by John A.J. Creswell (1828-91) Civil War Senator from Maryland and Postmaster General under Grant. An interesting record in excellent condition. (Est. $150-200 )
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Correspondence group on Fugitive Slave Act and the Missouri Compromise.

875. Letter group, totaling 9 pages (one letter partial), dated August 20, 1856, August 25, 1856 and October 4, 1856, all from Reading, PA, all written on blue lined paper and all from C. W. Ladel to a cousin. The letters are almost exclusively concerned with politics, Ladel's hatred of slavery, but belief in the Union saying, in part, "...Now what did Fillmore do when acting President by the will of God - that he should receive bitter curses...upon his silvery Head by the northern Republican Disunionists? Why he signed that Fugitive Slave Act. Supposing he had not signed that act. What would have been our condition as a people now! Would we have been the prosperous & growing people we really are. No...I love Mr. Fillmore not because he is a friend to the north nor the south, but because he is a friend to our whole country..." Some discoloration and some separation at folds. A fine set of correspondence with extensive political content. (Est. $300-500 )
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A Confederate Marine (one of only 56!) hires a slave while in C.S.A. service.

876. Rare manuscript contract signed by Confederate States Marine Lieutenant John D. Fowler hiring a slave while in service. ADS (entirely in Fowler's hand), 1 p., June 4, 1862, Richmond. The contract reads: "I have this day hired from P.B. Law (as agent for M. Sizer), a negro man (Reuben) conditionally, for one month at twenty dollars per month, provided the aforesaid M. Sizer does not object to the contract, and if he (M. Sizer) does, the boy (Reuben) is to be returned to P.B. Law whenever he may demand him. Lt. John D. Fowler, Commissary, C.S. Marine Battalion." This short document from one of only 56 Confederate Marine officers is significant because it records a wartime transaction involving a slave, and because Fowler was the only Confederate marine officer to die while on active duty. He had been wounded while a private in Company D, 4th Alabama Infantry at the battle of First Manassas. Almost a year later, he died at home. While initially languishing in a field hospital, he so impressed Jefferson Davis in a chance meeting, that Davis offered the wounded soldier a commission on the spot. Later, Fowler was assigned as battalion commissary and it is likely the slave "Reuben" was hired as a personal man-servant since Fowlers lingering wound might have dictated the need of one. Excellent content, interesting history. (Est. $1,000-1,500 )
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A true piece of African-American history.

877. An incredible study: sixth-plate, cased tintype studio portrait of two Black soldiers posed in front of a "camp" backdrop. Highly unusual to find such an image... African-American buddies taking time to have their photograph taken before going back to battle. Gold accents detail the buttons on their coats and the tops of their kepis. The boots they wear denote their service in either the cavalry or with an artillery unit. An absolutely superb presentation! (Est. $4,000-6,000 )
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878. Ninth-plate ambrotype of a Black man posed with a young, White girl. His hat would suggest he is a family servant - no doubt responsible for duties related to the family. Some light solarization/streaks, still quite distinct. Housed in a period, gutta-percha case, an interesting photo. (Est. $600-800 )
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Two Black soldiers posed with their mother before going off to war!

879. An important and quite rare African-American family portrait... "brothers-in-arms" (pun intended!) posed in their uniforms with weaponry. Sixth-plate, cased tintype, some bends and emulsion loss as shown, still a remarkable study - housed in a lovely, thermoplastic case. A scarce composition of Black portraiture. (Est. $2,000-2,500 )
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880. Ambrotype of a distinguished, antebellum Black gentleman. A sixth plate ambro housed in half case, circa 1856, the subject wearing an impressive cravat. Hair styled to the period, quite nice. One solarized spot in the background else quite excellent. (Est. $200-300 )
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881. Touching sixth-plate daguerreotype of a light-skinned Black woman tenderly cradling a delightfully plump White baby. The nanny looks directly into the camera with remarkable resolve, adorned by gold-detailed jewelry. Given her facial structure and appearance, we suspect a woman with Indian and/or African-American lineage - the contented child is wearing a gown that has been partially tinted blue. Housed in a velvet-lined gutta-percha case, lacking clasp. A warm, sensitive sitting... a delightful dag! (Est. $2,000-2,500 )
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882. Sixth-plate ambrotype of a Black woman holding a book or CDV album. In gutta-percha case, brass matted, another early portrait of an African-American at a time when such stuio sittings would have been uncommon. (Est. $300-500 )
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883. Sixth-plate ambro of a Black woman holding a book or CDV album. In half gutta-percha case, brass matted, left corner of plate cracked/broken but in place, not significantly hurting presentation. There is a quiet, proud resolve to her expression. Despite fault, a fine African-American portrait. (Est. $300-500 )
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884. Sixth-plate, cased tintype of a Black mammy with her charge - a rather plump little girl wearing a red dress. Housed in a decorative thermoplastic case, minor chips as expected, some typical light spots of emulsion loss throughout which detract little from the sensitivity of this warm image. There is a serene, contented look on the young, Black woman's face... the baby looks quite apprehensive! A wonderful, very 19th-century "family" portrait! (Est. $1,000-1,200 )
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885. Unusual sixth-plate ambrotype of a matronly White woman posed cradling a baby with a young Black girl at her side appearing quite attentive. This has all the sensitivity of an early Abolitionist composition... the White baby and Black charge all part of an "enlightened" family. We suspect from a New England studio, an extremely atypical -- and quite significant -- study. (Est. $3,000-4,000 )
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886. A handsome 88 page album (8 x 6 1/2) entitled Leaves of Affection. The book includes sentimental illustrations and blank pages used by friends and acquaintances from the Hudson River Institute of Columbia County, NY who wrote short notes or poems to the owner, "Hattie." In addition, several pages are embellished with pasted-in albumen photographs. The 44 notes date from 1861-4. The school taught languages and the arts as well as military, commercial, telegraphic and agricultural subjects. The most interesting signature is from a Black soldier, James Melius of the 159th Regt., New York State Volunteers. His page includes his photograph in uniform. Melius enlisted as a Private in Columbia County near the school and his regiment later fought at Irish Bend, was part of the siege of Port Hudson, fought at Petersburg and later fought under Sheridan's Army of the Shenandoah, most notably at Oppequan and Cedar Creek. The regiment (and Melius) mustered out at Augusta, GA in October 1865. Cover is embossed brown leather with a green circle surrounding title in gold. Typical age/shelf wear, overall fine. (Est. $500-800 )
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887. An extremely rare carte photograph: the 64th U.S. Colored Infantry in camp at Palmyra Bend. The 64th was organized in March of 1864, from 7th Louisiana Inf. (African descent). Attached to the 1st Division, U.S.C.T., they were posted and served garrison duty at Vicksburg until May, 1864. They saw action at: Ashwood Landing, LA; Davis's Bend and Natchez, MS; Point Pleasant, and Pine Bluff, AR. Mustered out March 1866. Gold-ruled board, clean and crisp. (Est. $1,500-1,800 )
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888. (SLAVE TRADING IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY) Interesting A.L.S. of R. J. White, a slave trader recently removed to Lexington, 2pp. 4to., Lexinton, Ky., Dec. 15, 1851. In part, "I am in Lexington negro trading. I have come to advance [?] nicely at last haven't I[?]. I am well pleased with Lexington and also with the Negro trade. I think I can make a bushel here if I only stick to [illeg.] and that I intend to do for I would rather be in hell than without money. I would like to know whether you intend going back to Texas or not... I think you had better go back for it is a good country to make money. If you go my advice to you would be have your money to source[?] a good man for five percent per month and take good security for it the interest on one thousand dollars for one year is six hundred dollars and then you could work for wages and by that means you could make eight or nine hundred a year." Usual folds, otherwise very good. (Est. $200-400 )
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889. Buy a few healthy slaves, we'll throw an old one in for free. A disturbing, early slave document. A bill of sale totaling $480 for four slaves, January 17, 1839. The manuscript document lists each slave and the price to be paid in an estate settlement. "Bob" cost $219 while "Lucille" only brought $60. The document notes that "the other old woman Lucy is so old and infirm that no body would bid for her consequently she avails the estate nothing." It is quite disconcerting to see actual prices attached to someone's name. Some separation at fold else quite a fine example. (Est. $100-150 )
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890. A fine document from the close of the War: a May 10, 1865 receipt in the amount of $30 for the monthly rental to The Freedmen Department of buildings they used. Signed by T.A. Walker, Captain of the 63rd U.S. Colored Infantry and Superintendent of the Freedmen, District of West Tennessee. The Freedmen Department ran a school for Blacks in Memphis, and this covered rent on their schoolhouse. Very light foxing, overall quite fine. (Est. $80-120 )
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891. Kentucky receipt for Keeping a Slave in "Gale." Manuscript Document, 4 x 8.5", Flemingsburg, Kentucky, July 1, 1839 in which A. W. Roch acknowledges receipt from John Laythrem of $1.50 "...as jail Fees for keeping a Negro in Gale..." The "Gale" to which to they refer was likely a holding pen for slaves before they were auctioned. In these "Gales", slaves were generally well treated and fed, as the auctioneer and seller wanted to put their property in the best possible light for sale. Lot accompanied by an article providing detailed description of slave jails. Irregular margins, light toning, otherwise very good. (Est. $100-200 )
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892. Seizure of Five Slaves to Satisfy a Debt. Manuscript Document, 2pp., 7.75 x 12.5", Grene County, Alabama, Nov. 14, 1853 in which the named executors acting on behalf of Lafayette Minor, are empowered to take possession of: "...Five Negroes named and described as follows... Ellick about 50, Johnston about 22, Sally about 40 and infant, Major about 14 and Femilla, 8 years old, also the crop of cotton and corn..." Very good. (Est. $100-200 )
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893. Alabama Slave Hire. Manuscript Document, 7.5 x 4.75", Gainesville, Alabama, January 5, 1847, in which Caleb Parker promises to pay "...three Hundred Twenty Six Dollars for the hire of Joe for year 1857, & also promise to give Joe good & sufficient cloathing and pay taxes & medical Bills..." The prevailing rate at the time for a field hand was around $50 per year, thus Joe must have been a skilled laborer. Tiny, clean holes at points, otherwise very good. (Est. $100-150 )


894. Paying the owners of a Black draftee killed while defending the C.S.A. Fascinating 1864 receipt given to a South Carolina slave holder for loss of his slave "Toby." During the War, the Confederate Government used slaves for military purposes and then was required to compensate their owners for their use. In this case, the slave was killed while working on military fortifications and this is the receipt recognizing the owner receiving $1,900 in compensation. Minor holes, some at fold, else fine. A rare, intriguing form -- compensation for the loss of a slave in battle. (Est. $200-300 )
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"Rendering Justice" to Blacks after the War.

895. An explicit and disturbing letter, July 23, 1867, detailing the beating of a "free" Negro boy by two White men in Woodruff Co. Arkansas. The details are rather gruesome... spelled-out in full to the recipient, Union General E.O.C. Ord in an apparent hope for seeking justice from the U.S. Military Government. In part: "last Saturday and while their several of them drank too much. A faithful old Freeman that I have owned for many years was one of a number that started home in the evening got some two miles when they were overtaken by two men, Tom Rainey & Prim Mason they got into a fight... the boy told him that he was free and Mason gathered a piece of a fence Rail and struck two severe blows knocking the boy to his knees the boy recovered and got hold to Mason and all parties but that boy would have given Mason a good thrashing ... Tom Rainey jumped from his horse gathered a piece of fence Rail and fell on the boy and cowardly beat him so that he was not able to get home and I had to send after him and have brought him home next morning... Civil Law it is a farce with the exception of a few irresponsible men such as Rainey... the free men are doing very well." This letter documents a very sad time in America shortly after the Civil War. (Est. $200-300 )
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896. EARLIEST PRINTING OF LINCOLN'S "EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION." Published just two days after he signed the Act is this original, "War Dept. Adjutant General's Office, Washington / Sept. 24, 1862" dated "General Orders No. 139" 4pp., 4 x 6", with printed signatures of Lincoln and Adj. Gen'l Thomas. The outer blank margins have been trimmed at sides. Printed for distribution to all officers within the War Dept. and to all units down the chain of command of the Army. One of the most important documents of the Lincoln Administration and the Civil War. Two very short marginal tears; aging. Historic. Although enacted and signed by Lincoln on Sept. 22, 1862 the Act was not in force until January 1, 1863. Great history! (Est. $300-500 )
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897. Insuring your slaves. Circular, 8 x 9", advertising slave insurance by the Albemarle Insurance Company. Included is a schedule of premium rates per $100 depending on the age of the slave. For example, an owner would pay $1.30 per $100 of insurance on each slave aged 8 to 15 years old. By 60 years of age, the rates jump to $5.66. Also noted is the fact that the insurance company has their own medical examiner. One toned spot at lower right, slight tear at folds, otherwise very fine. Extremely rare, the first example we have seen. (Est. $200-400 )
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898. Black regiment muster roll from the very end of the War. Folded, large-folio muster document detailing the service of Co. E, U.S. Colored Infantry, from April through June, 1865. This company saw action on the Red River Campaign, in New Orleans, Key West and Tortugas, Florida. They mustered out in Florida. Several dampstains, some loss at tight folds, still a fine specimen. Details the activities of thirty-six soldiers, all 3-year enlistments, most of whom mustered into service at New Orleans. Interesting content. (Est. $150-200 )


Wishful thinking!

899. A fascinating circular from the United States Ex-Slave Owners Registration Bureau. Written in 1893 from Savannah, GA., the circular asks ex-slave owners (or their heirs!) to provide the number and sex of slaves freed by the Emancipation Proclamation in order to try to get the U.S. Government to provide compensation to them because "...more than $800,000,000 worth of legitimate property was swept out of the hands of its owners in the Southern States." The Registration Bureau encourages filing because "...the time is fast approaching when it will be impossible to obtain an authentic record of slaves owned and recognized as property by law at that time..." Note the Registration Bureau was providing this service to ex-slave owners for a fee; the amounts to be paid are listed in the document. Slight loss at upper left corner and right side, small tears at folds, otherwise quite good. An interesting piece of little-known history. (Est. $300-400 )
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900. The Suppression of the Slave Trade... Speech of Hon. Henry Wilson, of Mass.,... Delivered in the Senate of the United States, May 21, 1860. A wonderful political imprint from General Grant's future Vice President. Printed by Buell & Blanchard, Washington, 1860, 8pp., partial clean separation at spine, important content just six months before the pivotal election. In part: "Mr. President, the general voice of Christendom pronounces the African slave trade a crime against humanity... To America belongs the glory of having led the nations in their effort to suppress this odious and polluted traffic; but in this work of inhumanity, which now stains and dishonors the age, American citizens, lusting for gold, though it be soiled by blood and tears, are enacting guilty deeds which bring dishonor and shame upon the American name. American avarice, in defiance of law, is now reviving with renewed vigor a traffic which is rekindling anew on the coasts of Africa... In spite, however... of the well-known and oft-avowed sentiments of the people, and of these acts of legislation... American merchants fit out in our harbors slave ships; American seamen navigate them; American citizens openly purchase and hold in perpetual bondage the surviving victims... and the American flag, the banner of our pride, is made to conceal and protect 'wrong, violence and crime...'" The proposed bill would have fitted out five Naval steamers to patrol African waters and absolved Naval officers from liability in the event that they captured a ship later found in court not to be engaged in slaving, among other provisions. Quite fine. (Est. $100-150 )
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In support of the 1871 Ku Klux Klan and Enforcement Bill.

901. Speech of Hon. Job E. Stevenson, of Ohio, delivered in the House of Representatives, April 4, 1871. (Washington: F. & J. Rives & G. Bailey, 1871), 36pp,, titled paper wraps, simply bound with string. An impassioned address to the House of Representatives by Rep. Job. E. Stevenson (1832-1922) offering evidence in support of outlawing the K.K.K. as essentially a terrorist organization. He cites and reads testimony from both opponents as well as its members. Of particular interest are statements made by Nathan Bedford Forrest found in reports from General George Thomas in which Forrest tells the general: "Why, General, people up North have regarded the Ku Klux as an organization which existed only in the frightened imagination of a few politicians. Well, sir, there is such an organization, not only in Tennessee, but all over the South, and its number have not been exaggerated... In Tennessee there are over forty thousand; in all the southern States they number about five hundred and fifty thousand... It is a protective political military organization." Stevenson offers mountains of evidence to illuminate the terror wrought by the Klan and notes the necessity of passing the bill in light of the guarantees enshrined in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. Congress passed the "Ku Klux Klan and Enforcement Act" of April 20, 1871. Light folds, toning at bottom, very clean and bright. (Est. $200-300 )
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902. A fabulous work of art and lovely display item of Black Americana. In brilliant color, this 12 x 14.5" advertisement for Bartlett's Blacking depicts a man admiring his blackened boots while his faithful servant looks on. Note the newspaper in the man's hand is also an advertisement for Bartlett's. Minor wear at edges, overall a vibrant, handsome piece. (Est. $400-600 )
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903. "No Negro Suffage." Graphic Reconstruction-era ballot. 3 x 11" on pale salmon paper with list of local candidates from Ohio, including several with military titles, no doubt wishing to capitalize on their war record. Issued in 1866 and titled "Democratic National Union Ticket. No Negro Suffrage." (apparently an issue most combatants on either side could agree upon). Great condition, light folds. (Est. $75-100 )
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904. Four-page lettersheet with Uncle Tom's Cabin theme noting that money from either the stationery or the performance was being donated to "aid the cause of the slave." Two small stains in blank area, overall quite fine. No doubt a scarce piece of stationery. (Est. $100-150 )
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905. A wonderful Civil War cover in orange, with a black and cream illustration pasted to the left . The illustration is of a slave saying "Whar is Massa Jeff now, dat's what's de matter.", all above the caption "The latest Contraband of War." Postal canceled, opened on left. Minor soiling, else fine. (Est. $50-75 )
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906. Pair of John Brown covers - almost identical in design but with different copyright lines. Includes the rabid abolitionist's purported last words: "I die for the inalienable right of mankind to freedom, whatever hue the skin may be." Both excellent... and scarce! (Est. $60-80 )
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907. Two racist covers including one sarcastic depiction of "Music by the `Contra-Band.'" The other presenting "Jewels" belonging to Virginia's "First Families" (slave shackles) is printed in blue. Both quite pristine. (Est. $50-75 )
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908. "Go Way White Trash!" Fun, racist trade card from New York's Eastern Matress Company. A rather odd way to sell beds! (Est. $40-60 )
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909. Civil War Songsheet A wonderful, hand-colored songsheet: Darkey Conscript by Charles Magnus. Great lyrics: "Now white folks I hope you take no offence, This war was for the Union when it first commenced. But now it is played out like an old hack. All they think of is the mighty Greenback." As expected, some passages are quite racist: "There's Greeley, he wants the niggers free..." The Magnus is pristine; mounting remnants at corners from verso, one ragged edge. (An example of this rare ditty - married together with a less significant piece - just sold in the Heritage Auction for $630!) Great! (Est. $250-300 )
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910. "THE SLAVE'S DREAM". Printed abolitionist songsheet bearing a song entitled "The Slave's Dream" and a shorter ditty, "The Slave's Funeral", 6" x 9" bearing advertising by the Boston bookseller, B. Levertt Emerson. The song reads bitterly in small part: "And this was in a Christian land, where men oft kneel and pray, The vaunted home of liberty where whip and lash holds sway..." Light foxing, otherwise very good. (Est. $100-200 )
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"Dedicated to Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe."

911. [Sheet Music] "Little Eva; Uncle Tom's Guardian Angel" by Whittier and Emilio, "Composed and Most Respectfully Dedicated to Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe." 1852, Jewett & Company, Boston. Minor wear, chipping only at margins, 4 pages. Wonderful! (Est. $150-200 )
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912. Illustrated 1861 sheet music, The `Contraband' Schottische... "Composed and Respectfully Dedicated to Maj. Genl. B.F. Butler by Sep Winner." The illustration depicts Blacks fleeing a man with a whip. Five pages, minor string remnants at edge where disbound, but intact. A great relic from the last throws of a failed system. (Est. $150-300 )
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913. In pictorial wraps: Tambo His Jokes and Funny Sayings, 60pp., small octavo, ca. 1890. (Wehman Brothers, New York City.) Originally published in 1882, this edition gives the complete array of monologues expected of a blackface minstrel show's tambourine man. The front cover, printed in bold red ink, has an engraving of a seated "Tambo." Fine. (Est. $100-150 )
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914. Thomas Nast centerfold from Harper's Weekly entitled "He Wants A Change Too." This comes from the October 28, 1876 issue and stands as one of the starkest, most dramatic depictions of an African-American in the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. Depicts an armed Black man preparing to retaliate against the violence perpetrated against his race. Quite a stirring image, a bright clean example. (Est. $150-250 )
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915. (Emancipation). An optimistic printed cartoon by Thomas Nast from the January 24, 1863 issue of Harper's Weekly, on a centerfold sheet measuring 16 x 22". Published soon after Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. Center vertical fold partially split, a few marginal tears, else very good and displays quite nicely. (Est. $150-200 )
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916. (Reconstruction). A dark and foreboding cartoon by Thomas Nast from the March 23, 1867 issue Harper's Weekly, on a centerfold sheet measuring 16 x 22" entitled "Southern Justice" replete with scenes of crooked courtrooms, lynchings, beatings and other atrocities committed against freedmen and those who came South to help them. Minor chips else near fine and quite clean. (Est. $150-250 )
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917. (Reconstruction). A nice pair of printed Thomas Nast cartoons from Harper's Weekly, each measuring 11.5 x 16". The first, from Sept. 8, 1866, is a commentary on the June 30, 1866 riots in which 37 Union supporters were killed: "Timely Warning to Union Men." The second, from the September 7, 1872 issue, is a scathing commentary on the Democratic Party's disruption of Reconstruction and the corruption of Tammany Hall. A few marginal chips, else very good. (Est. $100-150 )
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918. Rare Frederick Douglass silver-plated spoon. 6" in length, made in 1895 to commemorate the great Black leader's death. The bowl has a detailed portrait of Douglass; the stem lists the important dates in his life in chain links. It starts with his escape from slavery in 1838 up to his death in Washington, D.C. in 1895. An important piece of Black history. (Est. $400-600 )
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919. CDV-size, mounted albumen on 4 x 5 1/2" card affixed to a 10 x 12" board with period titlling: "The President, Vice President and Speaker who signed also the Senators and Members of the House who voted for the amendment to the Constitution abolishing Slavery in the United States." Note that this is a different design that puts Lincoln at the bottom, Vice President Hamlin at the top, and Speaker of the House Colfax in the center. While found in the larger format, this smaller example is quite elegant... and in pristine condition! (Est. $300-400 )
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The Civil Rights Movement in 1865... Rosa Parks Would Have Been Proud! An important piece of Black American history.

920. [Petition/Circular] An 8 1/2 x 14" handbill entitled "Memorial of the Pennsylvania State Equal Rights' League, to the Legislature of Pennsylvania." A petition signed in type by Negro residents of Philadelphia decrying discrimination on the public trolley/transportation system. They first allude to their faithful response to "the calls of the President for volunteers... many of whom enlisted... without the promise of a single dollar of bounty, and not more than half the amount of pay awarded to White Men." By an "unwavering devotion to Union and Liberty, have won Laurels and Glory for the former, and proved our right beyond all cavil to the latter." In spite of this, common carriers, "Corporations to whom you have granted Charters," have "brutally insulted, and outraged common decency, by kicking and dragging Colored Females from their cars, even when on their mission of love to the emaciated and fallen soldiers in our Hospitals..." Dated January 20th 1865. Highly significant given that it foreshadows what was to come in the Civil Rights movement one-hundred years later. Folds, generally excellent. (Est. $1,000-2,000 )
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921. A Black mammy with her charge. A fine carte photograph with imprint by Fred Clark of Harrisburg, PA. A touching, 19th-century portrait of the "extended family." (Est. $200-250 )
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922. Sixth plate tintype of a young African-American woman. She is dressed in her finest attire... no doubt from a well-to-do Black family. A fine portrait. (Est. $100-200 )
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923. A wonderful CDV featuring a Black nanny holding a White infant in her lap. Photographer's imprint on verso, Peter Baab of New York. Minor lift of albumen at bottom of board else quite fine. (Est. $80-120 )
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924. Black-face silver print. 4 x 6" original photograph, circa late 1880s-90s, identified on verso as "P'ason Pullbone en route to Possum Hollow meetin' House." A fabulous, satirical -- and quite derogatory image! We don't know anything of the history but are quite intrigued by this evocative characterization. (Est. $150-200 )
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His father was born a slave... one of the greatest vaudeville comedians to break the color barrier! A tremendously rare signed photograph of the great George Walker.

925. WALKER, George. (1873-1911) Inscribed Signed Photograph, "Very Truly yours, Geo. W. Walker..." (Very bottom of mount trimmed obscuring some words of an inscription.) A 4 x 5 1/2" photograph on a 1907 mount by Morris of Lawrence, KS (Walker's home town), housed in a lovely frame. George Walker, together with Bert Williams, formed a vaudeville comedy team that enjoyed one of the most renowned and successful stage partnerships in American theatrical history. They started in separate careers and decided to team up when they met in San Francisco in the early 1890s. Their first success came when they billed themselves as the "Two Real Coons." This was at a time when minstrel shows featuring White actors in black-face were popular. Williams and Walker pioneered a new kind of "Black" humor forming their own touring company. With numerous musical shows in production, they opened the door for other African-American actors, singers, dancers and musicians and redefined the boundaries of legitimate Negro theater. Additionally, their efforts were a big influence on the development of American musical comedy theater. George Walker, dancer, singer, and comedian, was in charge of planning, staging and promoting the company. Bert Williams, a man of similar talents, never reached his full potential on stage. He was caught in the stereotypical role of the bumbling fool in blackface, but gained recognition long after his death as one of the most important comedians in American popular theater. He was also the first and only African-American to be featured in the Ziegfeld Follies along with such notable stars as W.C. Fields, George M. Cohan, Fannie Brice, Eddie Cantor and Ed Wynn. In Dahomey, conceived by Walker, used African elements of the American Negro background as the theme for the show. On February 18, 1903, it was the first full-length black musical comedy that played on Broadway. (The show later traveled to England and the cast performed at Buckingham Palace in a royal command performance for the birthday party of the Prince of Wales.) Williams and Walker based their act on standard minstrel routines reduced to a two-man performance: Walker played the part of a dandy and told the jokes, and Williams, dressed in mismatched, oversized clothes, played the straight man. After the audience reacted favorably to a performance in which he blackened his face, Williams donned the burnt-cork mask for the rest of his professional life. In 1896, a musical farce called The Gold Bug made Williams and Walker famous. The play was weak, but the duo's performance of the cakewalk captured the audience's attention, and they soon became so closely associated with this dance that many people thought of them as its originators. On October 11, 1901, when Williams and Walker made their first recordings for the Victor Company, they became the first African-American recording artists. An exceptional rarity and significant piece of Black Americana! (Est. $500-800 )
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926. "Mammy Of Ye Olden Times." Extremely rare mammoth albumen photograph of a black slave/servant, c. 1860's. This superb keepsake, quite large at 10 x 15" overall, presents an older Black woman sitting by the steps of a front porch next to a small basket; a set of keys attached to her coat. Hand-titled "Mammy of ye olden times." She was most probably a slave who worked inside the home (she has a set of keys!). The image has excellent tone and detail, just some light wear and age to the mount. Rarely does one encounter these large format images, especially with this content. (Est. $300-500 )
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Absolutely MAGNIFICENT detail!

927. Anti-Confederate (Abolitionist!) Magic Lantern Slide. At top center is an image of a winged Satan labeled "MISERY AND BONDAGE" who looms over a series of vignettes illustrating crimes committed by the South ranging from the general e.g. "Slavery", "Treason", "Stealing Cattle" to the specific including "Bayoneting the Wounded at Bull Run", "Hanging Union Men", "Murdering Union Pickets" and other charges. At center is a vignette of an overseer whipping a slave over a bale of cotton while another overseer looks on smiling. Other illustrations include towns, ships and bridges on fire, the hanging of "Union Men". This is one of the most detailed of these devices we have ever encountered... great art, tremendous propaganda, fabulous history. (Est. $400-600 )
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