CIVIL WAR BROADSIDES, EPHEMERA, PHILATELY, CURRENCY & RELICS



724. 7TH REGIMENT... THE CRACK REGIMENT OF N.H. Huge headlines on this circa Dec., 1861- early 1862 recruiting poster seeking young men of New Hampshire for the Union army. 19 x 28" with wonderfully detailed, fierce American eagle standing on U.S. shield illus. in center background. Advises that Capt. A.S. Edgerly "... has been appointed Recruiting Officer for the 7th...to be raised by Gen'l Abbott under sanction of the U.S. government... $10.00 dollar bounty! ... pay and board from the day of enlistment." Pay "thirteen dollars a month for Privates" [and].... AT CLOSE OF THE WAR ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS IN MONEY AND 160 ACRES OF LAND." Light age browning typical period, generally exc+.; two very light, faint, round water stains near center, do not detract from the overall appearance. Has been expertly and professionally mounted on thick paperboard to permanently preserve. Shows few tiny spots where minor holes were filled not affecting appearance or any wording. Most suitable for framing. The 7th N.H. was in both assaults and siege of Fort Wagner, S.C. and fought through numerous campaigns in Virginia through to war's end; including Drewry's Bluff, Bermuda Hundred, Petersburg, New Market, Ft. Fisher, and others. (Est. $3,000-4,000)
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725. ORIGINAL CIVIL WAR RECRUITING POSTER. Easily displayable size 18 x 24". Circa 1862-63. Seeking young men of a New York state county (near Albany) to show their patriotic colors. Very bold 2" headlines "ENLIST! ENLIST!... RENSSELAER COUNTY REGIMENT! ... Lansingburgh Company! ...Look at the inducements." ....itemizing six various bounties (totaling 202 dollars) by the U.S. and State of N.Y. and county, etc. to enlist, plus extra pay: "STRIKE! TIL THE LAST ARMED FOE EXPIRES... STRIKE! FOR YOUR ALTARS AND YOUR FIRES... STRIKE! FOR THE GREEN GRAVES OF YOUR SIRES, GOD AND YOUR NATIVE LAND" ... also urges "YOUNG MEN OF LANSINGBURGH" to enlist. Recruiting officer "Charles H. Fisher" authorized to enroll volunteers in that district: "... I have chosen to commence my efforts among you, the playmates of my boyhood, the friends of my youth and the associates of riper years... our country... now in extreme peril and earnestly calls upon your sons to come forward to her aid [do not] sit coward-like at home selfishly attending to your own private business while the liberties we prize so highly are subverted... while the glorious institutions of our free government are in danger... our brothers... have gone before us so bravely met the perils of the battlefield, from the blood-stained soil of Virginia [etc.] ... Now! It is the time to act not in words... but by example to lead others to the appreciation of your duty... [for] the suppression of the this infamous rebellion..." Printer's imprint of the Albany Morning Express at bottom. Just light normal aging; minor stain spot in lower right and left corners only, has been very professionally framed many years ago in gilt finished wood frame with some chips, a handsome example.
(Est. $3,000-4,000)
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This is what they thought of those avoiding military service!
726. Wonderful, framed broadside, 12.5 x 18.5" overall, lampooning those getting exemptions from military service. Entitled "Attention X-Imps!" and printed in blue, the broadside parodies a call for a parade to include "...Varicose Cadets, on the vain, Pleuro Pneumonia Cattle Guards. Toe Nail Diggers, Heart-less Squabs. Toothless Gummers..." At the end of the procession, marchers will hear an address entitled, "Frailties of Mankind." Normal fold lines, otherwise very fine. (Est. $1,500-2,500)
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727. How to recognize a deserter! An important and quite rare circular/broadside from "Head Quarters, Wheeler's Cavalry Corps. March 14th, 1863. General Order, No. 4." Orders from Major-General Joseph Wheeler to Cavalry Commanders establishing roll calls and the guidelines for declaring a soldier a deserter. "All men who are considered deserters will be arrested. Company commanders will certify every Sunday to the Regimental commander that orders have been complied with." Desertion was a constant problem in the Civil War for both the Union and the Confederacy, to the point that not even officers were enforcing regulations, resulting in these orders. One of the ways soldiers were encouraged to stay in the Army was through promotions. This order gives the basis for promotion as well as the "proper form to be used in recommendations for promotion." Minor water stain at bottom right, normal discoloration/toning, 3.5 x 11.5", overall fine. (Est. $600-800)
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728. Fun broadside, 11 x 15 3/4", printed in blue, advertising "A Panorama of the Great Rebellion" with depictions ranging from the firing on Fort Sumter to the "burning and evacuation of Richmond by the rebels." Lower portion features wonderful humor to bring in the crowds... "Gentlemen with bricks in their hats will please deposit them at the Ticket Office for safe keeping... Counterfeit Currency taken at a discount of One Hundred per cent... Children, Without Regard to Age, Double Price." These panoramas were quite engaging displays - this exhibit by celebrated artists included a single work more than 1,000 square inches long! Light foxing, archival restoration in the upper left corner, quite lovely! (Est. $400-500)
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Hand-drawn map detailing the defenses of Washington.


729. A fine, pen and ink, manuscript map detailing the defenses of Washington in the vicinity of Arlington and the encampment at Fairfax County, VA. Dated and docketed on verso "E.L. Halsey Oct. 1862," E. Sidney Halsey served in the 127th NY Vols. and died about a month into the campaign at Upton's Hill, VA. The map shows Forts Ethan Allen (next to the camp for the 40th Massachusetts) and Marcy together with the headquarters of Generals Franz Siegel and Abercrombie. Also noted on the map are "Log cabins - Free Darkies", a "Sutlers shop... used as a Hospital last winter", "Rifle pits", "old camp 127 N.Y.V.", as well as the Road to Leesburg, woods (both cut and standing) and other physical features. Each of the buildings is drawn in precise miniature and there are even tiny representations of soldiers scattered about. Usual folds, otherwise clean and bright and in fine condition. An evocative piece that displays quite nicely. (Est. $500-700)
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"...putting a little money in the empty pocket of some unpaid soldier..." Hmm... don't call us cynics... but, we have to wonder what really happened to that $500!


730. Two-page ALS, January 3, 1865, on illustrated letterhead, "Massachusetts Military State Agency," Washington, D.C. From a Gardiner Taft to Mrs. J. E. Chase of The Soldiers Relief Society, Gardiner writes, in part: "My dear Madame, I acknowledge with great pleasure the receipt of the munificent gift of $500 - from your Society. When I think how much good I can do with this money and how many men I can benefit. I feel deeply grateful that you have selected this agency to dispense your noble charity...It will be expended in dollars, half dollars, and quarter dollars, putting a little money in the empty pocket of some unpaid soldier, bringing little luxuries to the sick or sending home some penniless wife or mother..." Very fine. (Est. $80-100)
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731. A wonderful post-war (circa 1866) printed circular concerning requirements for claiming provisions from the U.S. government, in part: "...Proofs of Citizenship and Loyalty Required in Support of Claims for Quartermaster Supplies...said...claimant will...show...the certificate...which he claims to be a citizen...claimant will...file...the oath of allegiance...loyal to the United States...claims for damages...or depredations committed by troops are not considered by the Quartermaster's department..." Much more authoritative content. (Est. $150-200)
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732. 1st Wisconsin Group. A Civil War pay voucher for Isaac Jennings, 1st Lt. Co. `K', 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, March 31, 1865, oblong folio, includes his "negro servant." Together with copies of documentation sent to General Montgomery Meigs pertaining to land in Mobile, Alabama. 1866. Also, a British discharge, 1862, on vellum, for a soldier in the "1st Battalion Regiment of Rifle Brigade". Three (3) eclectic items from a family's retained papers. A fine group. (Est. $100-150)
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733. Pass to buy a coffin! A.D.S., Aldie, Va., Nov. 15, 1862, a pass issued to Mrs. Harriets Hickson [should read "Hixson"] and John J. Lyon to pass through the Union picket lines on the Fairfax Court House and Leesburg Road, valid for one day. The letter is affixed to a period album page taken from a Hixson family album, with a notation in another hand at bottom of the mount: "Pass furnished Mrs. Hixson to get coffin for her dead son". Our research shows that there were no dead Union soldiers with that family name, and only one Virginian Confederate, Felix Hixson, killed at Frazier's Farm on June 30th. The process of obtaining the bodies of loved ones through the lines was a lengthy one, requiring passes, government permission from both sides, and so on. (Est. $100-300)
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734. A CIVIL WAR APPEAL TO PARENTS TO INDUCE THEIR SONS TO ENLIST AND AVOID THE DRAFT! Unique broadside/handbill circulated to residents of New York City and environs. Circa 1862. This one actually sent to the parent of a son who eventually became colonel of a regiment of colored troops. 5"x8". Bold headline "PATRIOTS COME FORWARD!" Enticingly worded; Capt. William Howland (of 127th N.Y. Infantry is "....enrolling a company of young men of good moral character... serve for three years or the war" known as the "MONITORS." [named after the naval vessel that beat the C.S. Merrimac earlier in the war] ... company now rapidly filling up... [whose] members pledge themselves to avoid...the immorality and discord usually connected with camp life... recruits mustered at once and go into quarters in one of the most beautiful locations on Staten Island... In the present critical state of our country will young men still wait to be drafted?... WILL PARENTS WITHHOLDING THEIR SONS BECAUSE THEY DREAD THE IMMORAL INFLUENCE OF THE CAMP, EXCUSE THEMSELVES AND EXPOSE THEM TO THE CAPRICE OF FORTUNE WHEN DRAFTED?.... Come voluntarily young men and choose your associates in the performance of a most sacred duty. Who would not rather be a volunteer than a drafted man in such a glorious cause?" Also mentions cash inducements offered. "Headquarters 308 Broadway... drill every evening..." Even names officers and civilians who may be contacted as references. Light aging; exc+. Intriguing illustration in center panel of the reverse only (otherwise blank) of the famous USS Monitor flying a large American flag. Accompanied by the original, stamped envelope in which it was sent, with Port Royal, South Carolina postmark and impressed design in the corner of the USS Monitor; addressed to Mrs. Jacob Bogert in N.Y. City, mother of John A. Bogert who was mustered into this outfit as 1st Lieutenant in 1862, rising to Captain, 1863 and later transferring as Lt. Col. to the 103rd U.S. Colored Troops. This outfit "MONITORS" served almost exclusively in South Carolina including the siege of Battery Wagner, bombardment of Fort Sumter, operations against Charleston and other campaigns, expeditions and skirmishes throughout the war to 1865. Most unusual and rare type of recruiting appeal, especially with this associated individual history. (Est. $600-800)
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735. Confederate receipt to fix an ambulance. Partly Printed D.S., 8 x 7", Mobile, October 27, 1863, a receipt for $25.00 which included "one Hub for ambulance... fifty spokes for Wagon @ 20¢ ... four pieces for pillows @ 1.00... three bolster pieces @ 2.50..." Typical horizontal fold, tiny loss from ink erosion, otherwise very good. An interesting item. (Est. $50-80)
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736. Great historical content... perhaps a "Dealer's Lot?" A collection of ten (10) Civil War military documents; eight detail the courts martial of various soldiers. Also included is an invoice for supplies purchased on behalf of the Army along with an "Abstract of Articles, Expended, Lost & Destroyed," which deals chiefly with horses and items necessary for their care and use. A fun, eclectic group of ten original documents. (Est. $60-80)
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737. Law and Order! Four page manuscript legal document, General Order No. 81 of the 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, dated December 11, 1863, outlining charges and findings for numerous soldiers facing courts martial. Two guilty soldiers, Privates John Kelly and Edward Brown, both of the 11th Mass., were found guilty of Desertion and sentenced to prison, loss of pay, and the branding of a "D" on the back of their left hands in indelible ink. Bound with original ribbon, a great example of wartime justice! (Est. $60-80)
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738. A group of six (6) documents: four General Orders and two Special Orders, dating from March 1863 to March 1864. Most involve the courts martial of soldiers and officers for offenses ranging from "Disobedience of Orders and Neglect of Duty" to desertion. Two orders appoint a new Judge Advocate. Six items in total, a fine group. (Est. $70-90)
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Crimes and... bizarre punishment!
739. A four page manuscript legal document, General Order No. 5 from the 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, dated January 23, 1864, outlining charges and findings for twelve soldiers who faced courts martial. Two of the soldiers, having been found guilty, are required to parade around with placards on them. One is to be marked "skedaddler" and to be worn for three days while the other is to be marked "straggler" and to be worn for six days. Interesting content and certainly unique in terms of how to address inappropriate behavior in the military during war! Great content. (Est. $60-80)
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No wonder they lost!
740. Manuscript Document Signed, from Charleston, November 21, 1862, on "Head Quarters, Department of South Carolina and Georgia" letterhead. Written to Confederate General Russeau: "General, In reply to your letter of the 17th, I am instructed to say that a return will be required once a week according to the form lately sent you. As to the manner in which these returns must be made out, I refer you to my letter of the 2nd of Oct. by which letter you will see that the main portion of command must be reported weekly and the returns of the detached companies taken from the latest return from said command in your office and in the next return the proper corrections and alterations made..." The letter, quite handsome in presentation and penmanship, is signed "Chief of Staff & A.A. Genl." Wow! Talk about mind-numbing bureaucracy! Minor mounting remnants on verso, overall quite fine. (Est. $200-300)
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Eli Whitney's son had nothing to do with
cotton gins... He was busy making guns for the Union Army!
741. Fine 2-page ALS, July 24, 1863, on letterhead from the "Office of Whitneyville Armory, Whitneyville, (near New Haven, Conn.)." Written by Eli Whitney, Jr. to William Anthony, Agent, "P. Tool Company, Providence." Whitney is the son of the man who invented the cotton gin and founded the Whitneyville Armory in 1798 to produce muskets for the U.S. government. Eli, Jr. ran the armory throughout the Civil war. He writes, in part: "Dear Sir, Can you sell me 1 or 2,000...Marshall...musket Brls & if so what are your lowest terms...Let me know how soon & at what price you can finish up or nearly so 1,000 or more of these good & serviceable Brls not to be subject to U.S. Inspection." Whitney continues with requests for other goods as well. Interesting content from a munitions maker sourcing materials used to finish his arms. (Est. $100-200)
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742. Talk about an opportunist! A formal statement of charges against Second Lt. Edward Geradin of Company D, Independent Battalion of New York State Volunteers. This remarkable court martial prefers four specific charges against Geradin including stealing uniforms from his own men, sometimes using the cloth to make clothing for himself as well as defrauding the government for uniforms he falsely claimed to have returned to government stores. He was also charged with subsequently altering official records to hide his theft. An interesting record of a not-so-honorable officer! (Est. $100-200)


743. Promoting Future Civil War Generals... including upgrades in rank for Grant, Pickett and Beauregard! A nice group of original printed General Orders, many signed in ink by Adjutant General Samuel Cooper, others bearing the stamped signature of Adjutant General Roger Jones, totaling 50pp., 4.25 x 6.5", Washington, dating between July 5, 1849 and April 1, 1854 noting the promotions, appointments and resignations of numerous officers who would become significant players in the Civil War. Promotions include George Pickett, Ulysses S. Grant (both brevetted for gallant conduct at Chapultec), John H. Winder (brevet for conduct during the capture of Mexico City), Bernard Bee, P. G. T. Beauregard, Danville Leadbetter, Montgomery Meigs, William Rosecrans, Simon Bolivar Buckner, Ethan Allen Hitchcock, David R. Jones, Irwin McDowell and others. Also of interest are the primary assignments of various West Point classes including Quincy Adams Gilmore (1849), William B. Magruder (1851) and others. Resignations include John M. Schofield and Henry W. Halleck. A few pages bear a light vertical crease, pin holes at left margins, otherwise bright and clean. (Est. $300-400)


744. Soldiers Allowed to Wear Beards for the First Time! A fine group of original printed General Orders, some bearing the ink signature of Adjutant General Samuel Cooper, others bearing the stamped signature of Adjutant General Roger Jones, totaling 18pp., 4.25 x 6.5", with several fold-out tables, dating between January 2, 1852 to May 12, 1854. Of interest is a single page order (No. 2) dated Washington, January 6, 1853 noting that "Paragraph 218 of the 'Regulations for the Uniform and Dress of the Army' (General Orders, No. 31, of 1851) is amended as follows: The beard to be worn at the pleasure of the individual, but when worn to be kept short and neatly trimmed." Other orders deal with new clothing patterns for the artillery and infantry. Pin holes at left margins, otherwise bright and clean. Great military history! (Est. $300-400)
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745. Promoting Future Civil War Generals. A nice group of original printed General Orders, many signed by Adjutant General Samuel Cooper, others bearing the stamped signature of Adjutant General Roger Jones, totaling 56 pp., 4.25 x 6.5", Washington, dating between May 30, 1848 and September 1, 1856 noting the promotions, appointments and resignations of numerous officers who would become significant players in the Civil War. Promotions include William T. Sherman, George Meade, Fitz-John Porter, Barnard Bee (brevet for action at Molino del Ray) George B. McClellan, Ambrose Burnside, Daniel T. Tompkins, John T. Sprague, Henry Halleck, James B. McPherson, John Bell Hood, Quincy Adams Gillmore, John Buford, and many, may others. Pin holes at left margins, otherwise bright and clean. (Est. $300-400)
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746. Civil War Period Almanacs. A set of three editions of Leavitt's Farmer's Almanac for the years 1860, 1861, and 1862 published for booksellers in Concord, Franklin and Dover, New Hampshire. Illustrated with woodcuts for each month. Bindings loose, paper wrappers and pages chipped with typical foxing and light soling, otherwise fine. Content includes every bit of information you could need... from Sabbath prayers to the names of those who sat on the Supreme Court... from phases of the moon to jokes and population tables. These have it all! (OPEN)
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With some less-than-politically correct
sentiments... "HANG the Jew!"
747. "The Great Rebellion", a privately published poem by "A.C." of Philadelphia, October 22, 1861. Great patriotic stanzas and sentiments: "Three-thousand dollars I have loaned to crush Rebellion Out; This sum I've lent to Uncle Sam - May He the Rebels rout." Another verse expresses a more vengeful tone: "And hang them high as he was hung, who would have hung the Jew, and confiscate their lands and cash, and all their Negroes, too." 9 x 12", insignificant 1/2" mounting remnants at left edge on verso, excellent decorative elements, overall quite fine. (Est. $150-250)
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748. State of the Union Blockade. Significant printed circular, 8 x 13.5", [n.p.], October 15, 1864. A report on the state of the Union blockade of the Southern Coast issued by John A. Dahlgren commanding the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron which covered most of the coast of South Carolina from Murrell's Inlet to Port Royal noting the disposition of 100 ships both steam and sail guarding the coast including those "Sunk or Stranded"; "Captured" included the Columbine and the Water Witch. Usual folds, a few minor toned spots, otherwise fine. (Est. $1,000-2,000)
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749. Life goes on... at least out on Long Island. (File this one under the heading "nothing really changes.") While fatigue parties (burying details) were just beginning to inter the thousands of dead soldiers senselessly mowed down in the carnage at Gettysburg, the local grandees of Manhasset, Long Island were concerning themselves with the problem of poaching. Offered here is a curious printed broadside, 8 x 9.75", Manhasset, July 4, 1863 in which the undersigned "...request all persons not to shoot, hunt, trap, or catch game of any kind, or take anything from our premises without our permission..." Light age/folds, otherwise very good. Ironically, most of the signers probably bought their way out of having to serve in the army! (Est. $100-150)
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750. "Important to Soldiers!" A wonderful example of 19th century "ambulance chasing!" E.C. Boudinot ran a claim agency that helped widows, orphans, the wounded, former prisoners... anyone and everyone entitled to some recompense, be it a pension or a bounty! Details entitlements for anyone as far back as the War of 1812. This 5 1/2 x 10"circular starts with the promise that "All soldiers and sailors of the late war are entitled to pensions if they incurred any disability, either by accident or otherwise, whether wounds, injuries, hemorrhoids or piles, loss of sight, impaired hearing, fever and ague, disease of liver, heart or kidney, weak back, enlarged veins, or any other disability whatever, even the loss of a finger or toe entitles them to a pension." Oy vey! Can you imagine how much this guy could collect for someone suffering from both inflamed hemorrhoids AND ague, whatever that is! This enterprising individual also notes "I prosecute claims for patents and Trade-Marks; inventors will find it greatly to their advantage by addressing me." He concludes with the warning "Delay is Dangerous!" An interesting item -- we suspect his retainer was exorbitant and his "contingency fees" would now be considered criminal! (In other words, E.C. Boudinot was most likely an opportunistic S.O.B.!) The first example we've seen; bright and clean. (Est. $100-200)
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751. Jefferson Davis "Metamorphic" card, c. 1865. Wonderful anti-President Davis/Confederacy piece that folds out, having 6 panels. The cartoons show the state of Davis and the Confederacy as it changes from 1861-5, the last panel being "The End Of The Confederacy." A graphic piece - this item rarely comes on the market in such excellent condition. (Est. $300-500)
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752. Graphic 6 x 9" songsheet, Capture of Jeff. Davis. Composed and Sung By John Forbes At Long's Varieties, 758 South Third St., Below German, Philadelphia. Published by A. W. Auner, 1865. Davis shown trying to elude capture by Union soldier. "White folks now I'll sing a ditty, if you'll listen to my song, About de capture of Jeff. Davis and de way it was done; Old Jeff. Davis was a rebel leader, and he runn'd away from home; As he wos de fust seceder, he ought to be de fust one hung." (Est. $140-180)
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753. An unusual - and RARE song-sheet blaring "Chivalrous C.S.A!" to the tune of "Vive La Compagnie!" Measuring 5 1/8 x 8 3/4" and published on September 21, 1861 in Baltimore - a hotbed of pro-Southern sympathies since the earliest days of the secession crisis. Baltimore had been under martial law and without habeas corpus since the Baltimore riots in April 1861. "Chivalrous C.S.A.!" speaks plainly about who they support "They have a bold leader, Jeff Davis his name..." and the Union disaster at Bull Run in July: "At Manassas they met the North in it's pride, Chivalrous C.S.A.! But they easily put McDowell aside..." A wonderful example of border-state sympathies. Very fine and quite scarce. (Est. $700-900)
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754. Crippled Soldier's Song. An interesting printed flyer entitled 'CRIPPLED SOLDIER'S SONG" likely handed out by a destitute, disabled veteran. Measuring 3 x 8.25" the sheet bears a six stanza song closing with the request "PLEASE BUY OR RETURN." A hint of age toning, else fine. An evocative appeal for help from a veteran who served his country. Touching. (Est. $40-60)
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755. Tremendously rare Confederate stationery! A four-page lettersheet issued by W. & J. Bonitz of Goldsboro, North Carolina. All C.S.A. paper of this sort is scarce... this design with firing cannon and patriotic verse is particularly desirable. And, save for miniscule album remnant at extreme margin, in absolutely superior condition! (Est. $300-500)
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756. Civil War Advertising. A printed flyer in blue and red, measuring 4.5 x 8" for "Brooks' Military And Traveling Writing Case, weight but eight ounces." Features a motif of flags in blue and red. A fun, ephemeral item! (Est. $40-60)
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757. Liquor will be seized! A 9 1/4 x 5 1/2" receipt from Harnden Express, a private package company serving the army and soldiers, printed in red. Includes detailed disclaimer stating that Harnden was not responsible for "any loss or damage thereto arising from the dangers of Railroad, Ocean, Steam, or River Navigation, Fire in stores, Depots, or in Transit, Leakage, Breakage, or from any other cause whatever...Packages containing Liquor are contraband and cannot be forwarded..." They can and will be consumed, however, by Harnden Express employees! A fun piece of Civil War ephemera! (Est. $50-75)
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758. Colorful 5 x 7" cartoon dedicated "To A Sesesh." An opportunistic businessman is depicted with treasonous glee reading the Richmond Enquirer with a headline proclaiming "Union Defeats." A portrait of Gen. Lee adorns wall, one line in the poem reads "You are the two-faced villain, though not very bold, whould would barter your country for might or for gold." Light folds, bright, first we've seen. (Est. $80-120)
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759. Hurrah for Jeff Davis! 3 1/4 x 5" card with portrait of Davis surrounded by cannons and rifles and flanked by two 10-star Confederate flags. Inscribed "The Champion of the South. Hon. Jefferson Davis." Printed in red and blue. A similar example sold in last year's auction for $575. This is a clean example. (Est. $250-350)
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760. Extremely scarce set of red and blue printed Southern Rights patriotic cards. Six (6) wonderful statements of patriotism with appropriate condemnation for "Tyrants." From early in the war, each with minor mounting remnants on verso from album, each approximately 3 x 4" and overall quite bright and clean. (Est. $300-500)
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761. Two colorful Southern Rights cards, 3.5 x 2" with red and blue details, both with the state seal of Maryland on coated stock. Minor mounting remnants on verso from album else quite fine... and quite scarce! (Est. $80-120)
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762. Rare set of six (6) patriotic cartoon cards, approximately 2 x 3.5" on coated stock, depicting various attacks on Jeff Davis and the Rebs. Removed from an album, mounting remnants on verso, quite clever content! (Est. $300-500)
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763. Three (3) carte-de-visite-sized cartoon cards, two on coated stock. Two present Jefferson Davis "in drag," the third has the Confederate President on his knees begging for leniency from Billy Wilson. One with minor album remnants on verso; overall a fine group. (Est. $300-400)
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764. In a pig's... well... you know where this one is going! Two sarcastic caricatures, both in red & blue, one depicting a bull harassing Jefferson Davis and the other making a play on an old saying. Both cards are 3 3/4 x 2 1/4" and more than articulate one form of "patriotism!" (Est. $80-120)
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765. Humorous 5 1/2 x 3" announcement of an 1861 political speech by B.W. Throckmorton in Montclair, NJ. inviting both liberal and "illiberal" attendees! Great war ephemera. (Est. $40-50)
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766. Neat ephemeral items... tickets to three gatherings in Philadelphia. One for a Civil War Young Bachelors'gathering; one for the patriotic Union Association (in red and blue); and one detailing a Volunteer Refreshment Saloon festival. The largest ticket is 4 1/2 x 3 1/4". Minor mounting remnants on verso, else bright and clean. Such small pieces remind us of the everyday life that formed a backdrop to the war. (Est. $50-75)
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767. Constitution of the State Grand Orders of the Anti-Horse Thief Association, 12 pp., for the State of Kansas, 4 x 6". Shortly after the commencement of the Civil War, lawless men in the border states banded themselves together for the purpose of plundering honest citizens. Missouri was especially subject to the depredations of these gangs, and in time the conditions became so bad that the law-abiding people found it necessary to take action for defense and therefore initiated an "Anti Horse Thief Association." The effectiveness of the organization became apparent and the order spread to other states. Later, its scope was widened to include all kinds of thefts and a national organization was incorporated in Kansas. Normal wear. Together with a postcard from Missouri to Kansas giving notice of a stolen horse, a description of the horse and the thief, and the reward being offered. Postally used, quite fine. (Est. $300-500)
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One of the supreme ironies of the Civil War -
A rare program from the moving ceremony led by Rev. Beecher to re-raise the flag at Fort Sumter and celebrate the Union victory... the very day Lincoln would be assassinated.
768. Printed document, Programme of the Order of Exercises at the Re-raising of the United States Flag at Fort Sumter, Charleston, S.C., 14 April 1865, Upon the Fourth Anniversary of the Fall. Printed at "The New South" office, Port Royal, S.C. 4pp., pristine condition. Robert Anderson, the same Union officer who had to relinquish the Fort after a punishing Confederate bombardment in 1861, was given the honor of re-raising the very same flag that the Rebels lowered four years before. After the assembled crowd sang the national anthem (only the first verse, although all three are printed here), and Henry Ward Beecher gave the keynote address, Anderson raised the limp and somewhat tattered banner. It was, at first, an unimpressive sight. But upon reaching the top of the pole, a strong gust of wind caught it, and as if suddenly brought to life, the flag flapped vigorously in the early spring air. It seemed an omen of national rejuvenation to all those assembled--a sentiment severely dampened by the proceedings at Ford's Theatre later that night. A marvelous rarity with great association. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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PHILATELIC AND CURRENCY
769. C.S.A. Currency Group. Confederate bills from 1864. This set includes $2, $5, $10 and $20 bills. Types #70, #69, #68, #67. XF or better. Four (4) items in total. An extremely fine group in quite fresh condition. (Est. $150-250)
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770. C.S.A. Currency Group. Similar to preceding lot, an 1864 set including $2, $5, $10 and $20. This represents types 70, 69, 68, 67, XF or better. Four (4) quite nice specimens of money from the failed government. (Est. $150-250)
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771. C.S.A. Currency Group. A sizable 1864 group including six (6) examples each of $5, $10, and $20. Includes types 69, 68, and 67. Most XF or better. Eighteen (18) pieces in total. Quite an impressive lot of bills! (Est. $300-400)
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772. C.S.A. Currency Group. 1864 group of $10 bills, type 68. Most XF to New (mostly the latter), some with folded edges only. Bright, vibrant colors, some with deep rid tints. Twenty-six (26) pieces. A great hoard or dealer's lot! (Est. $400-600)
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773. C.S.A. Currency Group. Collection of 1864 $10 bills, type 68. Most Fine to VF. A few better, a few with small flaws, overall a great holding. Twenty-four (24) pieces in total. (Est. $300-500)
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774. C.S.A. Currency Group. An 1864 set of $20 bills, type 67. Very Fine to nearly New (mostly latter), several with only folded edges, a few with nice, deep red tints. A superior offering, eighteen (18) pieces. (Est. $300-500)
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775. C.S.A. Currency Group. Another 1864 set of $20 bills, type 67. Very Fine to nearly New (mostly latter), several with only folded edges. A few nice red tints. Eighteen (18) pieces together, overall a great selection. (Est. $300-500)
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776. C.S.A. Alabama Currency Group. State of Alabama 1863 notes including 25¢ (11 pcs.), 50¢ (1 pc.), $1 (34 pcs.). Together with 1864 $5 (2 pcs.). The $5 bill is particularly interesting with a vignette of a mounted overseer watching his slaves harvest in the fields. (Such "outings" were numbered by the time this bill was issued!) Offered with four C.S.A. notes including one $1 and three $2. Condition ranges from Fair to Very Fine. A huge collection from the "Heart of Dixie" (the "Cotton State.") While we are certain you know that "Alabama" means "tribal town" in the Creek Indian language, you may not remember that the state motto is Audemus Jura Nostra Defendere - We Dare Defend Our Rights! Fifty-two (52) pieces; a great hoard! (Est. $500-750)
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777. C.S.A. Alabama Currency Group. State of Alabama 1863 notes including 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, $1 and 1864 notes for $5 and $10. Generally Fine condition. Six (6) pieces in total. (Est. $100-150)
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778. Confederate $100 Note. A good example of CR-315-20, an 1862 $100 note featuring slaves hoeing cotton at center and a bust portrait of Calhoun at left. Red and black hand-stamps on verso noting interest paid show through to recto slightly. Light vertical creases else quite fine. (Est. $100-150)
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779. [C.S.A. Bond Group] Three (3) Confederate $100 bonds: CR#38, paying 8%, redeemable January 1 1875, four coupons were redeemed - oddly, no additional coupons "cashed-in" after 1865! This bond features a portrait of R.M.T. Hunter. Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (1809-87) represented Virginia in the House and Senate, was a delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provincial Congress at Richmond; Confederate Secretary of State; and was one of the peace commissioners who met with President Abraham Lincoln in Hampton Roads in February 1865. (He was briefly imprisoned at the end of the Civil War.) Also: a similar instrument, redeemable July 1, 1880, CR #30, a rare specimen with a portrait of Thomas Hill Watts of Alabama, one of the signers of the secession ordinance. He served as President Jefferson Davis' Attorney General and wartime Governor of Alabama. And: an example of CR #46, redeemable January 1, 1880 (talk about optimistic!), with a portrait of Thomas Bragg, Jr. Bragg (older brother of Confederate General Braxton Bragg), Governor of North Carolina, also served a term as C.S.A. Attorney General under Davis. Three excellent financial instruments of the Confederacy, condition universally quite fine. (Est. $300-600)
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780. Similar to preceding lot, this with four (4) bonds including: CR #30, quite fine; an example of CR #20, also in great condition; and two examples of CR #29, both with some light toning at center. Overall, four fine specimens. (Est. $300-600)
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781. Beautiful $500 bond printed under the Authority of the Confederate States of America. Issued in 1863, the bond was to pay 8% semi-annually and mature in 5 years. It includes all of the coupons below. This historic document, 14 x 16", printed by B. Duncan of Richmond, with an ornate border, features a vignette of C. G. Memminger, the first Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States. Christopher Gustavus Memminger (1803-88), born in Germany, was a member of South Carolina state legislature, a delegate to South Carolina secession convention, 1861; Confederate Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64. He was the Chairman of the committee that drew up the Constitution of the Confederate States of America. Pardoned by President Andrew Johnson in 1867. Usual folds, quite bright and clean. (Est. $150-300)
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782. 1864 Confederate Bond, 18 x 8 1/2", no stated amount (making it easier for the Treasury to raise money!), bearing a 4% interest rate. At the top of the bond is a fine illustration of an ironclad battling wooden sailing ships. Stamp to allow for transfer on verse. Light, typical age, an unusual specimen. (Est. $100-200)
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783. Confederate Bond. A scarce, 11 x 8" uninscribed $1,000 6% "non-Taxable Certificate" as approved by the Rebel government February 17, 1864. Printed by B. Duncan of Richmond, this pristine financial note includes a rather halcyon scene of a shepherd minding his sheep at top. (Odd such an idyllic engraving would adorn a war bond!) A great example! (Est. $75-100)
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The Original Act Creating Some of these Confederate Bonds.
784. Confederate Imprint on Treasury Notes. A rare and fairly early Confederate imprint, 11pp. 5.25 x 8.5", [Richmond], Aug. 18, 1861 entitled "AN ACT To authorize the Issue of Treasury Notes, and to provide a War Tax for their Redemption". The act authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to "...issue Treasury Notes, payable to the bearer at the expiration of six months after the ratification of a treaty of peace between the Confederate States and the United States, the said notes to be of any denomination not less than five dollars... shall not exceed one hundred millions of dollars; the said notes shall be receivable in payment of the War Tax hereinafter provided, and of all other public dues except the export duty on cotton, and shall also be received in payment of the subscriptions of the net proceeds of sales of raw produce and manufactured articles..." Moderate dampstains, small marginal tear at right, otherwise very good. Mistakenly cataloged by Parrish & Willingham (Confederate Imprints, 1860-1865) as a broadside (#61), we cannot find a single copy of this in any institutional holding. No doubt quite scarce. (Est. $200-300)


785. The Confederate Government on how to finance the war! Three imprints, each stamped "Rebel Archives, War Department." The first, 4pp., February 17, 1864, is an Act providing for the issuance of new notes and bonds (up to $500 million) and to reduce the amount of currency in circulation. The second, 2pp., November 9, 1864, amends the above Act of February 17, 1864 so that total new debt would "not exceed" $1 billion. (Talk about debt!) Slight damage at top edge, else fine. The final item is proof of an Amendment authorizing the Treasury Secretary to issue additional debt. (The total amount was not yet determined.) Three C.S.A. government tracts on how to pay for their secession from the Union! (Est. $150-300)


786. Civil War scrip... and financial history! A collection of twenty (20) Civil War era banknotes and scrip, most with fine engravings. Includes two counterfeit (facsimile?) Confederate notes, as well as private scrip from North and South Carolina, Tennessee, New York. Twelve are mounted to sheets, eight are loose. Overall a clean group. (Est. $200-400)
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787. Civil War shinplasters - a great collection. An extraordinary group of thirteen (13) "shinplasters," private-scrip, mostly from Massachusetts in various denominations from two to twenty-five cents, 1862-3. Most are issued while some remain fairly clean "proofs." Shinplasters were small-denomination notes issued by banks and other businesses in response to a lack of coin. (The name derives from the quality of paper which was so cheap that with a bit of starch, it could be used to make papier mache-like plasters to go under socks and warm shins.) Six have been mounted to another sheet. Most are in near fine condition. Offered together with three mounted newspaper clippings listing merchants who "agree to discontinue the taking of 'Fractional Checks' or Private 'Shin-Plasters..." Great Civil War financial history! (Est. $500-1,000)
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788. South Carolina Rail Road Scrip with 5-cent Lincoln orange underprint. Three (3) examples: one, two, and three dollar denominations. (#UC RN-P5.) The Lincoln impression on the 2-dollar note is unusually strong and clear, each is quite pristine. (Est. $250-300)
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From the most successful business in the world!
789. New York Custom House merchandise-withdrawal bond issued for the H.B. Claflin & Co. Warehouse with the addition of a deep orange, 50-cent stamp printed with a bold, clear impression. (This is the highest denomination of RSP imprints with Lincoln's image.) Document details various goods removed from the Claflin warehouse. Appleton's includes the following note regarding Claflin's business: "the ability of Mr. Claflin may be judged by the magnitude of the business, which from 1865 to the time of his death far exceeded that of any other commercial house in the world." Horace Brigham Claflin (1811-85) was a passionate abolitionist and supporter of the Lincoln Administration. Minor separation at folds, else excellent. (Est. $200-300)
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790. Rebuilding Boston at the outset of the War. Stock transfer certificate representing 4,000 shares of the East Boston Improvement Company. The transfer is dated October 27, 1860, the company incorporated that year. Lovely red stamped corporate seal, very fine. (Est. $80-100)
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791. The first true memorial stamp... issued just four months after the assassination. A bright red example of the 25-cent denomination Newspaper and Periodicals revenue stamp. In the philatelic world of stamp collectors, it would be several additional months before an official Lincoln issue was printed by the Post Office. A fresh, clean specimen. (Est. $80-120)
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792. Lincoln and Lindbergh group! These are each canceled in 1928 touting that "Lindbegh Again Flies the Air Mail." One cover includes an "Air Mail Greeting" circular insert from the Springfield, IL Post Office with quotes and pictures. Each has the Spirit of St. Louis 10-cent commemorative stamps, with accompanying cachet elements and stamps. (Est. $100-200)
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793. Another Lincoln and Lindbergh group! From his celebratory tour just three months after his trans-Atlantic flight! Group of three (3) postally-used covers, two post-marked August 15, 1927 from Springfield, IL, the other sent June 18, 1927 from St. Louis. Each has as Spirit of St. Louis 10-cent commemorative stamps, special ink hand-stamp for "Lindbergh Celebration" days and related design elements... including the additional cachet element on one of welcoming Lindy to Springfield, "The Home of Lincoln." A fun group. (Est. $100-200)
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From President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's vast stamp collection!


794. Group of five (5) First Day Covers, each with Civil War and Lincoln-related issues, four canceled in 1937, one posted in 1942. Each is on a White House envelope and addressed to one of F.D.R.'s secretaries, Mrs. Charles Larrabee, The White House, Washington, D.C. Together with a similar White House envelope canceled from Gettysburg using the 1948 Lincoln commemorative; this addressed to the late President's Executive Secretary, Grace Tully, care of The White House. Six (6) items in total, a fun philatelic group! (OPEN)
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795. Abraham Lincoln Postal Dedication. A 7.5 x 10" fold-out program for the introduction of the Lincoln Five-Cent embossed envelope and the four-cent Lincoln postal card, both of which have been neatly tipped into the program. Both bear cancellations from Springfield, Illinois on November 19, 1962, the 99th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln of course served as postmaster of New Salem from 1833-36. Fine. (OPEN)
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RELICS AND RELATED
A relic from Lincoln's home!
796. [Relic] Bust of Lincoln mounted onto a 4 x 5" wooden board, slightly over 1/2" thick. Laminated to the back of the piece is a handwritten statement, in period ink, that attests to the fact that "This wood taken from the Lincoln house when repaired in 1899 the only home ever owned by Abraham Lincoln, the house was built in 1839..." The provenance goes on to quote a portion of the Gettysburg Address. A fun keepsake. (Est. $100-300)
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797. (GETTYSBURG REGIMENTAL FLAG REMNANTS). A great Gettysburg relic, being two small segments of the regimental battle flag of the 31st Pennsylvania Infantry, originally the 2nd Pa. Reserves. The relics include one rather tattered 2" x 2" section of white cloth, with a 2" x 1 1/2" gold-painted cloth letter "R". Both flag relics are encased in a period frame with the "eagle" discharge of Pvt. William Morrison, Co. E, released from service on June 16, 1864. The regiment's flag was presumably cut-up and passed out as souvenirs, as a new flag was issued on Mar. 16, 1864. The 31st had a distinguished battle record, fighting at Second Bull Run, Chantilly, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg where they made a brilliant charge and took the colors of the 15th Georgia. Morrison's discharge is toned, the relics are very good. (Est. $500-800)
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798. ELLSWORTH CONFEDERATE FLAG AND SHIRT RELICS. We offer a great historic relic, concerning which some background is required. Col. Ephraim Elmer Ellsworth (b. 1837) studied law in Abraham Lincoln's office and helped Lincoln with his campaign for president, ultimately traveling with him to Washington. The two became fast friends, Lincoln calling Ellsworth "the greatest little man I ever met." When the Civil War erupted, Ellsworth went to New York City and raised a regiment of volunteers from the city's firefighters. As colonel of the New York Fire Zouaves, Ellsworth was anxious to be the first to invade the South. On May 24, 1861, the day after Virginia seceded, Ellsworth led his men uncontested down the streets of Alexandria. He noticed a Confederate flag atop the Marshall House Inn. Ellsworth and four others quickly ascended the stairs; Ellsworth cut down the flag and was descending the stairs with the flag wrapped about his torso when the proprietor, James W. Jackson, killed him with a shotgun blast to the chest. Before Jackson could fire the second shot, he was shot in the face and repeatedly bayoneted by Cpl. Francis Brownell. Lincoln, grief-stricken, had an honor guard bring his friend's body to the White House, where it lay in state, and the Union's first man to fall in action became the nation's "martyr". We offer here what we believe are simply the finest Civil War relics we have encountered, namely two swatches of the Confederate flag torn from the roof of the Marshall House, one red, one white, each about 2" x 1 1/2", along with a 3/4" x 3/4" swatch of finely-woven crimson red fabric identified as a piece of Ellsworth's shirt. The relics are accompanied by two paper tags with undoubtedly period handwriting which reads in full: "Col. Ellsworth, his Trophy and piece of his Shirt" and "Pieces of the Secession Flag taken by him, and a piece of the robe shirt on him at the time of his death". Both relics and tags are encased in a period daguerreotype case painted gold on the outside. Obtained by our consignor from Civil War dealers The Horse Soldier, who obtained the relics from the collection of Norm Flayderman, world-renowned collectibles dealer. We know of only one other swatch of "Ellsworth's flag", and it currently resides at the Smithsonian. (Est. $4,000-5,000)
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799. (40TH N.Y. VOLS. FLAG RELIC) A rare small section of the national colors of the famous 40th N.Y. Vols., or "Mozart Regiment", an approx. 2" x 2" section of beige fabric set between two pieces of lucite with illustrated descriptive text and a photograph. The flag was presented by New York Mayor Fernando Wood on July 3, 1861 and stayed with the regiment during action from Balls Bluff to Chancellorsville. in May, 1863. At Fair Oaks every man in the color guard was killed or wounded carrying the flag. The 40th also saw action at Gettysburg, Bull Run and Fredericksburg. This fragment was preserved and is tied to the estate of Sgt. Christopher Lutjens of Co. A. (Est. $200-400)
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800. 37-piece group of non-dug Civil War revolver bullets and musket balls. Here is a nice mix of four standard projectile types used by Union and Confederate troops. The lot includes examples of the .54 caliber musket ball, the .31 caliber pocket revolver ball, .36 caliber revolver ball and the .44 caliber bullet. A good opportunity to acquire period loads in pristine condition. (OPEN)
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801. Confederate-owned powder flask. A choice example, 8 1/2" long, polished brass and copper hallmarked by James Dixon & Son of Sheffield. Lovely, quite detailed raised depiction of game: deer, fowl, along with a rifle. The design has been detailed with the owner's name, engraved: "M.H. Carpenter". The vignette is surrounded by a fancy, interlacing design. Carpenter was a member of the 1st VA Bn. Res. Co. H. (His name detailed on p. 226, The Roster of Confederate Soldiers, Janet B. Hewett, Editor, noting his Confederate service.) The screw-off mouth of the flask has markings for measuring drams of powder, and the lever is still intact. Only minor wear, and a few dings do not detract from the beauty of this piece.
(Est. $800-1,200)
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802. Civil War Spy Glass. A wonderful Civil War era piece, a brass field telescope. Measures 2" in diameter, 9.5" long when closed and 29" extended. Includes lens cap. Lenses clean and still functional. With leather around stem. Wear to leather with some loss, usual age wear, overall in very good condition. Our team of crack experts examined the piece and we can certify that you can view a person... perhaps in a compromising state of dress... or perhaps not... almost ten blocks away! (Est. $200-400)
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803. Civil War Field Glasses. A nice set of mid-nineteenth century brass field glasses. Measures 5" wide by 4.5" long. One lens cracked, usual wear, otherwise very good condition.
(Est. $200-300)
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804. Tin Soldier's Cup. A well used piece, a tin cup, 3.75" in diameter, 3" tall. Usual age wear a few rust spots, still in excellent condition for a piece used "in the field." (Est. $100-300)
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805. Civil War-era scapel (or related medical tool) with lovely pearl handle. Housed in a custom, velvet-lined case, 6 1/2" long, the blade has been somewhat dulled and is hallmarked "H. Pape." A nice item that could be used for either skillfully tending to one's wounds in battle... or perhaps as a gift for opening mail! (Est. $100-300)
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806. Civil War Era Knife and Fork. A nice pair of Civil War flatware being a ivory handle knife and fork measuring 7.25" and 9.5" respectively. Manufactured by Lamson Mfg. Co. with a March 6, 1860 patent date. Usual wear with only minor pitting. (Est. $100-200)
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807. Two items: a Civil War-era glass bottle with glass stopper, 8" tall, handsome light green coloring with nice feel of age. Together with a similar piece in color and age, a 4 1/2" tall inkwell. The pair make for a fun display. (Est. $50-80)
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Two extremely special items:
14kt. gold patriotic buckles.
808. This (as well as the following lot) are well-designed, quite lovely lady's buckles. 2 1/2" tall, 1 1/2" wide, original T-back pin intact on verso, some typical rubbing, great patriotic design elements: Liberty, Columbia, shields, eagle with "Union" streamer, etc. We are advised that these extremely rare pieces of jewelry are believed to have been crafted for well-to-do ladies wanting to proclaim their love of liberty and patriotic support for their men in the war. (Est. $750-1,000)
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809. Similar to preceding lot, this with teeth on clasp-bar. Same typical rubbing, some real heft, and once again... GREAT patriotic design elements. A very-well forged Civil War piece of jewelry. (Est. $750-1,000)
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