PHOTOGRAPHICA - MISC. FORMAT & CDVs


[Every year, as we catalog cartes, cabinet cards, and other photographs, we are reminded that the history of modern photography coincides with the election of our 16th president. Once again, we are pleased to offer a selection of significant portraits and photographica to our fellow Rail Splitters. "O" numbers, as expected, refer to the Lincoln portrait catalog by Charles Hamilton and Lloyd Ostendorf, Lincoln in Photographs.]

 

"The Last Photograph the President sat for."


58. One of two "last" photographs taken of Lincoln - the other (and true final photo) being the "balcony pose" by Warren (see lot #63!). This charming image captures the Great Emancipator as he poses with his young son, Tad. The 6-1/4 x 8-1/4" imperial albumen print, mounted onto card stock, was taken at the studio of noted photographer Alexander Gardner on February 5, 1865. Titled "President Lincoln And His Son Thaddeus. The last photograph the President sat for.", with publisher's imprint "G.F Bouve & Co." This photo features an added sylvan background. The 7 1/2 x 10 1/4" mount displays some light toning, overall excellent. The cartes now sell for $500+; this scarce, large format should well be worth... (Est. $1,200-1,500)


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With great provenance!


59. A large, mounted albumen, 13 x 17" on a titled 19 x 24'"board. An extraordinary study: "President Lincoln and His Private Secretaries." Below are the names of Lincoln's closest advisers and assistants "J. G. Nicolay" and "John Hay." The photograph is an artistic retouching of Gardner's famous portrait. Damp stains at top and left, small tear that lays flat, clipped top right of mount. All these faults can be easily matted out, to render a vivid, flawless presentation. Copyrighted by Philp and Solomons, their imprint at bottom of board. This huge portrait belonged to William S. Huntington and came from his estate. Huntington attended the 1860 Chicago Convention as a delegate from New York. He was an early Lincoln supporter and moved to Washington, D.C. to work in the Treasury Department before joining Jay Cooke's First National Bank. A true rarity! (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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60. The classic Ayres sepia tone portrait (#O-29) from Alexander Hesler's sitting of June 3, 1860, 6 x 8" sight. Attractively presented and professionally reframed in original period black and gold gesso frame with carvings and gilt liner. Signed by Ayres on verso. Ayres purchased Hesler's original plates just after the Civil War. In 1881, Hesler printed photographs from these plates in a number of different sizes. In 1933 the plates were broken when sent through the mail to Washington. In larger format, and a wonderful specimen. Excellent.
(Est. $1,000-1,500)
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61. Another example of the classic George B. Ayres photo from the original negative by Hesler. 6.5 x 8", chipping at extremities and slight loss of corner edges, this example with Ayres's penned copyright on verso. A fine specimen - would look great properly matted and framed. (Est. $700-900)
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62. Large, modern 13 x 18" silver-print of the famous Hessler portrait. A stunningly detailed, clear portrait, these were made from an interpositive using the original negative and reflect all the clarity and detail of the subject. Minor remnants on verso; would make an impressive display properly matted and framed. (Est. $200-300)
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63. On a titled board by the photographer: "The Latest Photograph of President Lincoln." With H.F. Warren's imprint, Waltham, MA, this is a 6 x 8" mounted albumen on a 10 x 13.25" board, one side slightly irregular. Taken on the balcony of the White House, March 6, 1865, this was published prior to the assassination as the photograph opportunistically changed the title from issues after April 15th from "The Latest..." to "The Last..." Fine contrast, soft tones, warm and pleasing. (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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CARTES-DE-VISITE
The carte de visite ("CDV") was a small format albumen photograph affixed to a somewhat standardized cardboard mount approx. 2-1/2 x 4". Debuting around 1860, it was the first inexpensive form of mass-produced photography available to the public, becoming an instant hit for the production of family photos as well as setting off an immediate craze in collecting. CDVs of famous personalities in all walks of life--politics, theater, military (both Union and Confederate), royalty, abolitionists, nefarious criminals and religious leaders, were actively sought. Millions of cartes were sold worldwide for over a decade setting off a rage known as carte-o-mania. These diminutive historical photographs have a charm unlike those of later decades. They have survived remarkably well and document an auspicious period of American history as well as the dawn of photography. To this day they remain a delight to collect.
[Unless noted, no imprint present. And, as in all cases, items may not be pictured to scale. Cartes detailed in other sections of this catalog as well.]


64. A quite scarce example of #O-118; on mount with Gardner's Capitol Dome imprint on verso. Considered Lincoln's "last formal pose from life," taken at Gardner's Gallery in Washington, D.C., February 5, 1865. A few specks detract little; full board, gold ruled, quite handsome.
(Est. $1,400-1,800)
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65. An exceptionally bright and clean example of #O-116, gold ruled board, rich detail. Taken by Alexander Gardner in Washington, February 5, 1865, this portrait conveys a quiet dignity and inner contentment... the war was concluding and in this last formal sitting, the President allows himself to seemingly relax before the camera with just a hint of a smile. Lovely!
(Est. $1,500-1,800)
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66. "Abraham Lincoln. Pres't U.S." The full version of #O-116, this from the famed Ostendorf collection and noted as variant "A." Slight trim/rubbing to titled mount as shown, includes Gardner's 1865 copyright. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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67. A rich, stunning example of #O-83, on mount with "curved Brady" imprint on verso, deep, rich tone and contrast. A few specks detract little; full board, about as fine a specimen as you will find.
(Est. $1,200-1,500)
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68. Also from the Ostendorf collection - a scarce example with Gardner's imprint. A superior example of #O-70, a photograph taken to inaugurate Gardner's new studio, August 9, 1863. John Hay noted this day in his diary, commenting that the President was "in very good spirits." That seems to be conveyed in the warm, soft smile that seems to peek from the Lincoln visage. A great carte. (Est. $1,500-2,000)

69. Talk about contrast! This Anthony/Brady carte, photograph by Thomas Le Mere, April 1863, #O-69, is about as crisp as they come. Full board, barely a hint of age, an exceptional CDV. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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70. A superlative example of #O-60 on an orange-bordered Anthony/Brady mount. A different view of the contemplative Lincoln from an 1862 sitting in Washington that included several poses; for some reason this one is tough to source... particularly in such excellent condition. Tiny speck in field to left of hand, rich tone and detail. A great carte! (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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71. A stunning, resonant example of #O-49, one of the famous "ink well" portraits taken February 24, 1861. Gold-ruled board with Anthony/Brady imprint, miniscule edge tear at lower left lays flat, rich tone and contrast. Certainly one of the best examples we've seen. (Est. $600-800)
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72. One of the scarcer "ink well" poses, #O-49, part of a series of five photographs taken during Lincoln's first sitting in Washington, D.C., February 24, 1861. Photograph taken by Alexander Gardner for M. Brady, with Anthony/Brady imprint on verso. Light even foxing detracts little, a fine specimen with full board. (Est. $700-900)
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73. A rare, full-chest print of #O-104, 1865 board by Anthony. Slight clips to upper corners from album insertion, light mottling mostly at coat, verso is toned with canceled revenue stamp. This pose is usually found vignetted; quite difficult to obtain in this more detailed shot. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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74. With great provenance: from the collection of the late Lloyd Ostendorf! A detailed portrait, #O-95, by Wenderoth & Taylor, their imprint and canceled revenue stamp on verso. These are usually found heavily touched; not so in this photograph. Light, typical age, crisp contrast and detail. A necessary addition for those building a comprehensive Lincoln carte collection! (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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75. A fabulous "Wenderoth & Taylor" study with remarkable tone, contrast, and resonance. Clipped corners to mount, detailed imprint on verso with canceled revenue stamp. Another great carte-de-visite photograph!
(Est. $750-1,000)
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76. Good luck trying to find one of these poses! The ONLY examples we have ever seen in carte format of #O-90 were a group of three at the Lloyd Ostendorf auction -- this is one of those CDVs. A photograph taken by Anthony Berger at Brady's Washington Gallery, February 9, 1864, this example from the four-lens camera and has been pencil-noted by Ostendorf as being variant "D." Some trim to board as shown and light spotting in background, Brady imprint, certainly prohibitively rare. (Est. $1,000-2,000)
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77. Anthony-Brady carte, imprint on verso, #O-91. This portrait is scarce in CDV format - a photo taken at Brady's studio on February 9, 1864. This pose is ubiquitous as an engraving but seldom found as a from-life photograph. Some age, light foxing, ink identified on mount, nice detail. (Est. $600-800)
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78. The classic "Speed portrait" on a blank mount, unusual in that this is the full chest-up view rather than the more common vignetted "head shot." (No pun intended.) Blue-ruled, a better-than-most example. (Est. $500-800)
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79. A wonderful rarity: Tad Lincoln posed in his very own uniform... shortly after Secretary of War Stanton gave him an officer's commission! Full board, imprints on front and verso; light, even mottling, mostly in background, detracts little. We know of very few from-life cartes of the child John Hay referred to as "a merry, warm-blooded, kindly little boy, pefectly lawless." A carte by Brady capturing the mischievous scamp in a desirable pose. (Est. $4,000-5,000)
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80. Fabulous advertising adorns this patriotic carte with affixed albumen of the President and his young son Tad. Embossed details, quite bold; one of the nicest examples we've seen.
(Est. $150-200)
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81. Scarce carte by Alexander Gardner with front and back imprints. #O-114, taken at Gardner's Washington, D.C. studio on February 5th, 1865, the photographer sold two versions: one with the added background of the unfinished Washington Monument, and one without. This example of Abe and Tad has the added "sylvan background." Typical soft tones and contrast associated with Gardner albumens, mount is in superb condition having just a light tone mark at the bottom right corner. A great Gardner image that rarely appears on the market. (Est. $1,000-$1,500)
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82. Two original period albumens, Mary in her inaugural gown, and a classic "inkwell" pose. These are NOT on carte boards but tipped to sheets as issued for a period frame. And, please note, these are NOT later copies or Meserve prints - they are from the original negatives and made to be placed in a Victorian frame. On boards, the pair would command in excess of $1,200+. This pair makes a wonderful presentation and would look great in a carte album or properly matted and framed. (Est. $300-500)
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83. Mary Lincoln by Brady. Taken early in 1862, excellent tone and detail. Some rubbing on verso, a hint of age, a nice specimen of a seldom offered carte. (Est. $200-400)
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84. Mary Lincoln CDV, Brady 1861 front imprint / Anthony-Brady imprint on verso. An extremely rare carte of Mrs. Lincoln, wearing her inaugural gown, taken at Brady's Washington, D.C. studio to honor President Lincoln's first inauguration. Some wear to the left edge of the albumen and some light toning at the right edge, overall fine with nice clarity and detail. We know of an example selling privately two years ago for $900.00. (Est. $200-300)
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85. An artistic study of Mary Todd Lincoln, imprint by Mumler of Boston, famous for haunting portraits that featured the "ghosts" of dead spouses - which he sold as genuine! Particularly well-known is his Mary Todd being visited by the dead Abraham, one of the great hoaxes in 19th century photography. A rare carte; pristine. (Est. $100-200)
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86. "A. Lincoln and Wife." There are no photos of the President posed with his wife - hence the need for these composite portraits. Nice, a hint of typical toning. (Est. $60-80)
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87. Lincoln and Washington albumens on embossed carte with crossed flags and eagle by A.E. Alden of Providence, RI. Light, typical age, one ink spot as shown, otherwise fine. (Est. $80-120)
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88. Patriotic carte with albumen portraits on an embossed carte by Alden. Eagle and flags adorn the mount, slight trim to right edge of mount, cleaner and brighter than most. The photograph elements are pristine. (Est. $100-150)
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89. Lincoln and his sons at home. Classic CDV (#O-38), taken by John A. Whipple of Boston in early 1860. The image shows the Springfield home with Lincoln and his son Willie standing behind the fence on the terrace while young Tad peeks out from behind the corner post. On the street corner are two unidentified neighborhood children. The verso reads "The late residence of President Lincoln, Springfield, Ill." A wonderful study, light toning as typical , nice. (Est. $400-600)
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90. Classic Brady carte of the elk-horn chair given to Lincoln, November 26, 1864, by California hunter, trapper, "mountain man" Seth Kinman. Superb tone and detail - a "tribute" to our great Executive. The actual chair was last seen in 1933 at a Chicago fair... its whereabouts today remain a mystery! (Est. $150-250)
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91. Group of three (3) cartoon cartes, two with clipped corners for album insertion, published in 1863 by J. Hall of New York. Great thematic use of Lincoln's visage... playing "Dixie"; "A Bitter `Draught'" depicting the President running a "conscription" shop with "Dr. Lincoln's Ready Relief Pills" (cannonballs) being marketed, one small albumen tear at edge lays flat; grandma Lincoln studying the newspaper with the headline "Draft" to discern "That's What's the Matter." Three fine CDVs that articulate political sarcasm widely marketed in the Northeast.
(Est. $200-300)
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92. A fine CDV of President Lincoln and his cabinet, circa 1863. Provenance: ex-Ed Emerson Collection, item No. 14. Somewhat light, fine. (Est. $100-150)
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93. One of the best portraits of Stephen Douglas we have seen! Slight clip to mount corners, posed with his top-hat! From the Ostendorf Collection, rich contrast, great detail. (Est. $150-200)
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94. Douglas by Anthony, imprint with additional "jobber's" label on verso. A short board with margin as issued, great detail in this study. Fine contrast and tone. (Est. $100-150)
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95. Stephen Douglas by Brady. Period identification on mount, light rub to edges of board, the "Little Giant" looks quite "senatorial" in this pose! (Est. $100-150)
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96. Another great carte of Douglas from the Lloyd Ostendorf Collection... this by Appleton. Gold-ruled board, great presence found in this clean CDV! (Est. $150-200)
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97. Two fine cartes: Douglas together with a photo of his gravesite, 1861. Both by Carbutt of Chicago, vertical crease to grave carte reinforced from verso, both from the Ostendorf collection, his label on verso. (Est. $100-150)
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98. Three (3) CDVs of Stephen Douglas from the Ostendorf Collection. The standing portrait is by Hesler of Chicago. Each exhibits some age, light creases. The addition of these to Lloyd's holding reflects his desire to obtain variants of every possible study. (OPEN)
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99. V.P. Hamlin, "Brady NY" in negative, on Anthony/Brady board. Excellent contrast, pristine. (Est. $100-150)
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100. Vice President Hamlin by Anthony/Brady, ink identified on bottom of mount, quite fine. (Est. $100-150)
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101. Salmon P. Chase by Anthony-Brady. (Est. $60-80)
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102. Sec. S. P. Chase by Brady. Full board, gold-ruled, fine imprint, just a hint of spot-mottling mostly in his jacket, overall fine. (Est. $80-100)
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103. Sec. of State Seward by Anthony/Brady. (Est. $100-150)
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104. Sec. of War Stanton by J.W. Black and Co., Boston. A clean example. (Est. $60-80)
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105. Vice President Colfax by Gurney of New York. An unusual, rather different portrait. (Est. $80-100)
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106. Schuyler Colfax by Whitehurst Galleries, Washington, D.C. A fine study of the Speaker of the House and Vice President under Grant . One minor rub at the bottom left of albumen, great detail. (Est. $50-75)
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107. His first official sitting as the newly-sworn President, Andrew Johnson on a titled mount by Alexander Gardner. 1865 Capitol Dome imprint on verso with canceled revenue stamp, one light horizontal streak, overall quite stunning. One of the best formal portraits of this controversial president to be found! (Est. $300-500)
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108. Another fine study of the man who assumed Office following the death of Lincoln. On Brady board, gold-ruled, light mark on cheek, overall quite fine. (Est. $200-250)
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109. In his official portrait by Brady: President Johnson on titled, gold-ruled board. Light rubbing at edges, overall a superior specimen. (Est. $300-350)
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110. Andrew Johnson, Anthony/Brady imprint on verso, crisp and quite detailed. A superb study of the President by Mathew Brady. (Est. $200-300)
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111. Andrew Johnson by C.D. Fredricks & Co., New York. Light marks in background, overall quite "stately" in presentation. A wonderful example. (Est. $150-200)
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112. A quite vivid, life-like portrait of Andrew Johnson, gold ruled and titled board, detailed with copyright on verso as "Painted from life by J.W. Dodge." An unusual, 1865 carte in excellent condition. (Est. $100-150)
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113. A rare carte photograph of the Copperhead George H. Pendleton, vice-presidential running mate of General George McClellan. By Anthony/Brady, slight trim to bottom of mount, canceled revenue stamp on verso. (Est. $80-120)
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114. Horace Greeley by Gurney & Son. Excellent tone and detail - you can almost count the whiskers in his beard! (Est. $80-100)
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115. Horace Greeley by Fredricks, NY. A superb CDV, rich tone and detail. (Est. $80-100)
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116. Edwin D. Morgan (1811-83), Governor of New York 1859-62, in the Senate 1863-69, a staunch Lincoln supporter/ally. Because of his wealth, Morgan was highly influential in Republican Party politics of his time and served as chairman of the Republican National Committee. Known for generous contributions to charities and causes, he contributed large sums to the Union Theological Seminary. A fine carte by Fredricks, light age, blue-ruled. (Est. $75-100)
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117. A great Civil War-era vignette study of future President James Garfield by Brady, Washington, D.C. Brady imprints with gold rule. Excellent condition. (Est. $100-200)
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118. James Garfield as a Brigadier General. Extremely rare carte of the future president in uniform. A superb image with excellent tone and detail, just a hint of age at the top edge. Finding early images of future presidents, such as this example, is difficult. (Est. $400-600)
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119. Scarce carte of Mormon leader Brigham Young by "C.W. Carter's Photographic Gallery" of Salt Lake City, Utah, his detailed imprint on verso. Exceptional clarity, rich contrast... this is one of the best you will find! (Est. $200-300)
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120. Unique among First Ladies, Harriet Lane served as official White House hostess for our only bachelor President, James Buchanan, her favorite uncle and her guardian. Lane was credited with tremendous success navigating difficult political waters leading up to the war... all with exceptional grace and dignity. Her tact did not falter, but her task became impossible - as did her uncle's. Seven states had seceded by the time Buchanan retired from office. A gorgeous carte by Anthony/Brady, imprint on verso. (Est. $100-150)
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121. A lovely carte of sculptress Vinnie Ream. Ream self-published the CDV in 1871, her copyright on verso. She was chosen to do Lincoln's statue in the U.S. Capitol. Light horizontal crease in the albumen off in the field does not affect portrait, slight loss of title at bottom. A fine example.
(Est. $60-80)
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122. "Col. D'Utassy, Garibaldi Guard." A wonderful study of Frederick G. D'Utassy of the 39th NY Infantry holding his regimental flag. Photo by Anthony/Brady with a detailed 1861 copyright on the front and imprint on verso. Minor clip at top portion of mount, light even age, overall fine and quite scarce. Last year an example sold for $660 plus buyer's. (Est. $400-600)
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123. Grant by Brady. Simple description: about as fine a carte of U.S.G. as to be found! (Est. $200-300)
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124. Titled 1864 carte "Major Gen. U.S. Grant" by Carbutt. Light age in background, still quite fine. (Est. $75-100)
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125. General Grant by Brady. Light, even age, full gold-ruled board, an interesting full-length portrait. (Est. $100-200)
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126. U.S. Grant on peach colored mount by Gurney & Son, New York. Excellent. (Est. $100-150)
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127. A warm scene entitled appropriately "Grant Family." (Est. $50-80)
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128. The best McClellan carte to be found! On board by J. Gurney & Son, New York. Revenue stamp on verso enhanced by "Gurney" stamped cancellation. Full board, pristine condition! (Est. $100-150)
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129. General George McClellan and Staff. Brady front and Anthony/Brady back imprints, 1861. A superb image of "Little Mac" surrounded by his officers. The CDV has excellent tone and detail, and is definitely the finest example we have had the pleasure to offer. (Est. $400-500)
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130. On 1862 titled board by Benjamin "McClellan and Head Quarters." An unusual CDV, mint condition. (Est. $80-120)
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131. Jefferson Davis by Anthony/Brady. Full, ruled-board, light albumen clips in background detract little, rich tone and contrast. (Est. $200-250)
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132. A fine study of Robert E. Lee. A period photo of a signed photo of the General. Nice tone/detail. (Est. $200-300)
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133. A young Robert E. Lee by Anthony, copyright under albumen at top of board. Fine artistic study. (Est. $150-200)
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134. Robert E. Lee's home - seized by the Feds - now our most revered final resting place for American heroes. "Arlington House, Head-quarters of the Federal Army" by Appleton, 1861. A scarce carte, light corner clips, great detail. Interestingly, the Lee/Custis family sued the U.S. Government for the return of family possessions that dated back to Washington... a case that wasn't settled until more than a decade following the War. (Est. $150-250)
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135. Gen. Christopher Columbus Augur by Anthony/Brady. Augur (1821-98) commanded numerous divisions and was promoted Brig. Gen. of volunteers in command of a brigade around Washington and Fredericksburg. Severely wounded at Cedar Mountain, he was the second ranking officer at the siege of Port Hudson. A crisp image. (Est. $100-150)
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136. Another CDV of Augur, this by Alexander Gardner with Capitol Dome imprint and canceled revenue stamp on verso. A very fine portrait. (Est. $150-250)
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137. A scarce CDV portrait of Medal of Honor recipient Absalom Baird. Baird (1824-1905) graduated from West Point in '49 and served in the Florida hostilities 1850-3. In March 1861, he took command of the light battery for the defense of Washington. He commanded forces in the Manassas campaign at Blackburn's Ford and at Bull Run. He led the fourth army corps in the Peninsular Campaign, where he was engaged in the siege of Yorktown and the Battle of Williamsburg. He went on to participate in the capture of Shelbyville, Dutch Gap, Pigeon Mountain, and Chickamauga. He was engaged in the battle of Missionary Ridge, was in numerous skirmishes in pursuit of the enemy in the invasion of Georgia, and was present at the surrender of Atlanta. He was brevetted Major-General of volunteers for services in the capture of Atlanta, the pursuit of Hood's army, the march to the sea, and the capture of Savannah. He participated in the march through the Carolinas, was engaged at Bentonville and Raleigh, and was present at the surrender of Johnston's army at Durham station. He was awarded the Medal of Honor on April 22, 1896 for voluntarily leading a detached brigade in an assault on the enemy's works at Jonesboro, Georgia, on September 1, 1864. At the time of the assault he was serving as a Brigadier General of Untied States Volunteers. (Est. $100-200)
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138. N. P. Banks on board with Anthony/Brady imprint. Full board, excellent detail and contrast. (Est. $200-250)
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139. General N.P. Banks later in life as a Congressman from Massachusetts. With credit on verso "Brady's National Portrait Gallery," a bold, clean portrait. (Est. $60-80)
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140. An exceptionally gorgeous study of Gen. Burnside by Gurney and Son of New York, showing him in his full uniform. A wonderful find! (Est. $100-200)
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141. General Burnside by Appleton. Gold-ruled board, only light age, overall quite fine. (Est. $100-150)
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142. An excellent and quite scarce study of Gen. Samuel P. Carter, early transferred from the U.S. Navy to the Army... a Tennessean in support of the Union. Fine detail, gold-lined Anthony mount. (Est. $200-250)
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143. Scarce carte photograph of General D.N. Couch by Anthony/Brady. Slightly clipped corners to mount, light age/foxing in background, nice contrast. (Est. $100-200)
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144. An important Wenderoth & Taylor carte: the superlative strategist, battlefield commander, and hero of Gettysburg, General Samuel Wylie Crawford (1829-92). An Army assistant surgeon after graduating from medical school in 1851, Crawford was stationed at Ft. Sumter when the Confederates attacked. Then appointed Major of the 13th US Regular Infantry, during the Shenandoah Valley Campaign he ascended to brigade command and was promoted to Brigadier General of Volunteers. His unit was decimated at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, and he was severely wounded commanding his division at Antietam. He was assigned to command the division in the Army of the Potomac made of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps (V Corps, 3rd Division). At the Battle of Gettysburg, Crawford directed the Pennsylvania Reserves on the second day of the engagement, where they repulsed the charging Confederates from the Little Round Top northern slope and Plum Run area after the southern troops had defeated Union forces in the Wheatfield. Crawford himself led one the charges made by elements of his division. His men occupied the blood-soaked Wheatfield after the Confederates retreated at the conclusion of the battle. He continued to lead his division throughout the rest of the war, and again won acclaim at the Battle of Five Forks. In 1887, Crawford wrote an important history, The Genesis of the Civil War. Wenderoth imprint on verso, published by McAllister & Bro., quite fine. (Est. $300-400)
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145. A handsome study of Com. J.A. Dahlgren on a blue-lined Fredricks mount, imprint on verso. (Est. $100-150)
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146. A fine portrait of Gen. J.A. Dix; gold-lined Anthony/Brady mount, detailed 1862 copyright. (Est. $100-150)
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147. Always a "hit" with collectors: General Abner Doubleday. Anthony/Brady mount, slight trim to bottom of board, light fly-specks, a better-than-usual example of the "father" of modern baseball. (Est. $300-500)
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148. A rare carte photograph by Anthony/Brady of Major General John G. Foster (1823-74). West Point class of '47, served with distinction in the War with Mexico, part of the siege of Vera Cruz and at Molino del Ray. Assigned as an engineer to work on coastal fortifications, in 1858 he worked on building Fort Sumter in Charleston (SC) harbor. During 1861, he was in command of strengthening the fortifications at Charleston harbor in anticipation of war. Foster was in command when the garrison at Fort Moultrie was transferred to Fort Sumter, and he was second in command when Sumter was bombarded. Foster was present when the fort surrendered and was evacuated. Foster then worked on northern coastal fortifications. He saw action in the capture of Roanoke Island (NC); participated in the capture of New Bern (NC), and in the bombardment of Fort Macon (GA). Foster was in command of the department of North Carolina commanding forces in all the North Carolina battles; he then commanded the department of Ohio. A tough portrait in excellent condition. (Est. $200-300)
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149. A great Henszey & Co. carte of General John W. Geary who commanded a division at Gettysburg and Chancellorsville. He also joined Sherman in the infamous "March to the Sea." Pristine. (Est. $100-150)
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150. An excellent carte-matted tintype of General Geary. John Geary (1819-73) remains an intriguing figure - although only 53 at the time of his death, he was a hero of the Mexican War, served as the first mayor of San Francisco, Governor of the Kansas Territory and later two terms as Governor of Pennsylvania, and had a hellacious Civil War record that defies description. He commanded forces in numerous campaigns including Gettysburg, was captured and exchanged, and was wounded at least eight times including being struck in the chest by a cannonball while leading a division at Chancellorsville! (Yes... he survived!) After the war, he was an active politician and even a presidential hopeful in 1872 with the National Labor Reform Party (prior to his withdrawing his name and supporting his old commander U.S. Grant). Slight rounding to mount corners, embossed window design, stamped photographer credit by Sheaffer on verso, fine contrast and detail. (Est. $200-400)
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151. Winfield Scott Hancock on titled board. Fine contrast, quite bold. (Est. $200-250)
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152. General Hancock with advertising label on verso for McAllister & Brother of Philadelphia. (Est. $150-200)
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153. A Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. Outstanding Brady portrait of General Francis J. Herron, recognized for heroism following his being wounded and captured while leading forces at Pea Ridge. Herron led forces in many theatres - principally in Department of the Gulf, Louisiana, and Texas. Light mottling in background, otherwise quite fine. (Est. $200-250)
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154. Clean carte of Gen. O.O. Howard by Anthony/Brady, gold-ruled mount, orange 2-cent revenue stamp on verso. A scarce example. (Est. $100-150)
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155. Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes by M. Brady, imprint on verso, full board with gold rules, light, even age at bottom of image, fine detail. Keyes (1818-95) compiled a glittering military record before the Civil War, having discharged duty in all three branches of the service. He was made a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Union Army and was assigned to the IV Corps, which he led during the Peninsular campaign. During the Gettysburg campaign, Keyes resigned due to differences with General Dix. (Est. $100-200)
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156. Brig. General John Henry Martindale (1815-81). West Point class of '35; when the war broke out, he promptly tendered his services and was assigned to the command of the First Brigade of Gen. Fitz John Porter's division (his brothers, Col. Edward Martindale and Brevet Major F.E. Martindale, and his son, Lieut. Edward H. Martindale - every adult member of the family - entered the service at the same time). Until March of 1862 Gen. Martindale was engaged in the defenses of Washington. Moving to the front with the advance upon Richmond by way of Yorktown, he participated in the disastrous Peninsula campaign. Embroiled in a Court of Inquiry instigated by Fitz John Porter, Martindale was completely exonerated by the Lincoln Administration and immediately made Military Governor of Washington, a critical position of responsibility, requiring both civic and military ability. In 1864 he left Washington to command a division in the movement toward Petersburg and Richmond. An 1862 carte by McClees of Philadelphia on a titled board. Excellent. (Est. $100-200)
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157. General Meade by Anthony/Brady. Great contrast, light mottling to background and sleeve, identified on mount, quite detailed. (Est. $80-120)
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158. From the year he mysteriously died! Scarce carte on titled board of Gen. Frank E. Patterson. Light age/foxing in background, 1862 copyright by P.F. Cooper of Philadelphia. Francis Engle Patterson (1821-62) fought with distinction in the Mexican War and again in the early part of the Civil War, commanding forces at Williamsburg and Seven Pines. While defending Washington, he was charged by Daniel Sickles, his division commander, with withdrawing his command without orders. Shortly thereafter, Patterson was found dead in his tent of an "apparent accidental discharge" of his own sidearm. A rare, period carte. (Est. $200-250)
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159. "Brig. Gen. Ricketts" on gold-ruled board with Anthony/Brady imprint. James Brewerton Ricketts, (1817-87). At First Manassas (1st Bull Run) July 21, 1861, he commanded a battery attached to Franklin's Brigade of Heintzelman's Division. During this battle, he was shot four times and taken prisoner by Confederates, not being exchanged until January 1862. Promoted to Brigadier General of Volunteers "for gallant and meritorious conduct" and assigned to command of a Division of McDowell's corps, he commanded forces at Cedar Mountain (where he covered N. P. Banks' withdrawal) and at Second Manassas. At Sharpsburg, he had two horses killed under him and was badly injured when the second one fell on him. When he recovered sufficiently for duty, he was appointed to the Fitz John Porter court-martial, and as result his reputation has suffered. He did not return to the field until March 1864, when he was assigned to a Division of Sedgwick's VI Corps, which he led through Grant's Overland Campaign against Richmond. In July 1864, his command, numbering 3,350 muskets, was hurried north to oppose Jubal Early's raid on Washington, D.C. Lew Wallace, his superior in the field, recorded that his Division "fought magnificently"; of the total Union loss of 677 men, his Division lost 595. Then he was engaged in Philip Sheridan's Shenandoah Campaign; at Cedar Creek in October, while temporarily commanding the Corps, he was wounded by bullet through his chest which disabled him for life. Nonetheless, he returned to command of his Division two days before Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox. A rare carte - pristine! (Est. $150-250)
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160. A very scarce Anthony/Brady CDV of General David Alan Russell, killed in action at Cedar Creek. Russell (1820-64) distinguished himself commanding forces in numerous campaigns - his successful attack at Rappahannock Station earned him the honor of delivering eight captured battle flags to Washington. Fighting at Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Chancellorsville, and Petersburg, he commanded a division in Sheridan's army in the Valley when struck through the heart by a shell fragment. Wonderful contrast and presentation; about as good as you will find! (Est. $200-250)
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161. He went on to become commander in chief of U.S. Army and Sec. of War under Grant! A striking portrait of Gen. John Schofield by Brady, canceled 2-cent revenue stamp on verso, light mottling as shown. Mounted upside-down as issued. Schofield (1831-1906) was a Union major general who led a corps at Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and in the Carolinas. A scarce portrait. (Est. $120-180)
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162. Anthony/Brady stylized portrait of General Winfield Scott. A scarce, full-figure, standing portrait.
(Est. $100-150)
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163. An extremely scarce carte of General George H. Sharpe by Alexander Gardner on Gardner's "Capitol Dome" mount. Sharpe was Major General of Volunteers, U.S. Provost Marshal, Bureau of Military Information and Chief of the Secret Service. He had studied law at Yale college, was admitted to the bar in 1854, and practiced until he entered the army in 1861 as captain in the 20th New York infantry. Sharpe became colonel of the 120th New York infantry in 1862, and took part in all the battles of the Army of the Potomac. He served upon the staffs of Generals Hooker, Meade, and Grant, and was brevetted brigadier-general in 1864, and major-general in 1865. He was a special agent of the State Department in Europe in 1867 overseeing the capture and return of the accused conspirator John Surratt. This rare CDV is from the Sharpe family album. (Est. $200-300)
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164. The best carte photograph of General Philip Sheridan we've seen! An extremely fine 1864 portrait of Philip Sheridan by Hoag and Quick of Cincinnati, canceled revenue stamp on verso. Sheridan entered the Civil War in 1861 as a captain and a year later was a major general of volunteers. His able leadership of campaigns in Tennessee prompted Grant to appoint Sheridan commander of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac. In May 1864, Sheridan's cavalry cut rail communications about the Confederate capital; as commander of the Army of the Shenandoah, he drove the Confederate forces in Virginia out of the Shenandoah Valley and then devastated the region to prevent it from being used to supply reinforcements. This is a great CDV of this important Union officer. (Est. $200-250)
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165. Gen. Sheridan by Anthony, on gold-ruled mount with imprint on verso. (Est. $60-80)
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166. General Sherman on Anthony board. Exceptionally fine tone and contrast; a stern, resolute portrait to be sure! (Est. $150-250)
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167. Exceptionally rich carte on titled, gold-ruled board: Maj. Genl. F. Sigel. Photographer paste-down on verso covers imprint, stunning contrast, pristine. (Est. $150-200)
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168. A clean study of Gen. Henry W. Slocum (1827-94), who commanded the Union right at Gettysburg and fought with Sherman in Georgia and the Carolinas. On a gold-ruled Brady mount with imprint on verso. (Est. $80-120)
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169. The "Rock" George H. Thomas, by Anthony, on a gold-lined mount with imprint on verso. (Est. $80-120)
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170. An artistic carte by Taber of Mass., titled on verso "Major-General Geo. H. Thomas." Clean. (Est. $50-80)
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A rare photograph of First Lady Mary Lincoln's cousin!

171. John Blair Smith Todd (1814-72), born in Lexington, KY, relocated with his parents to Illinois in 1827, U.S. Military Academy class of '37, assigned to the 6th infantry serving in the Florida War 1837-40. On frontier duty in Indian territory and Arkansas until 1846, served in the war with Mexico in 1847, taking part in the siege of Vera Cruz and the battles of Cerro Gordo and Amazoque, Todd was an Indian trader at Ft. Randall, Dakota, until 1861. He was then appointed brigadier general of Vols in the Union Army. When the Territory of Dakota was formed, he was elected as a Democrat to Congress and served on and off from 1861-5. A very scarce CDV by Anthony/Brady, pristine! (Est. $400-600)
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172. "During the entire civil war General Townsend was the principal executive officer of the war department, and was perhaps brought into more intimate personal contact with President Lincoln and Sec. Stanton than any other military official." (Appleton's.) A great Brady carte of General E.D. Townsend, Brady's National Portrait Gallery imprint on verso. Exceptional detail, quite fine. (Est. $150-200)
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173. The "Savior of Little Round Top" and victim of Sheridan's wrath! General Gouverneur Kemble Warren by Anthony/Brady. Warren, in command of Engineers, participated in many campaigns including the first land engagement of the War, Big Bethel. His greatest success came at Gettysburg where he single-handedly rallied troops to defend Union positions by taking Little Round Top. (A statue of Warren stands today on the very spot of his deployment.) Sadly, despite commanding forces in some of the most important battles of the War - and his receiving two wounds in action - Warren's military career all but ended in a bitter conflict with Gen. Sheridan, who leveled numerous unjust accusations. Warren spent the remainder of his life demanding a Court of Inquiry, and, was in fact, exonerated in 1879... the conclusion of a three-year judicial proceeding that ended three months after Warren's death! The heroic General was buried - at his instruction - without his uniform or any patriotic emblem whatsoever. A fine example, slightly light as made, cilp to corners of mount. (Est. $200-250)
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174. Col. William "Billy" Wilson (1823-74). Commanded the 6th NYS Vols., known as "Wilson's Zoauves." An extraordinarily rich and detailed Anthony/Brady carte. The 6th Regiment Infantry, organized at New York City in 1861. They fought in Florida, engaged the Confederate works at Pensacola and participated in the bombardments of Forts McRae and Barrancas. Ordered to New Orleans in 1862, they occupied Baton Rouge until March 1863. They subsequently took part in operations against Port Hudson, in Western Louisiana, Fort Bisland, Opelousas, Franklin and Centreville, among other battles. The unit enjoyed some glamour, but as detailed in a recent article (Civil War Times Illustrated, June 1999), "the arrival of... Wilson's Zouaves - at Fort Pickens - livened things up a bit. A Union officer described the Zouaves as `thieves, plug-uglies, and other dangerous characters gathered from the slums of New York City.' The regiment's priest, Father Michael J. Nash, wrote that the police had had to escort the men, `literally mad with liquor,' onto the steamship Vanderbilt, which sailed under sealed orders for Fort Pickens. Father Nash wrote: `All are sons of Catholics..., [but] their Christian education has been woefully neglected.'" On the expiration of its term of service the regiment was returned to New York City, and there, under Colonel Wilson, honorably discharged and mustered out June 25, 1863. A pristine CDV. (Est. $200-300)
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175. "Caught at Last!" Great cartoon with photo elements depicting Lee attacking Meade following Gettysburg; sign-post points the way to Richmond. 1863 copyright by J. Hall of New York; a fun item reflecting one type of period patriotic souvenir. Quite a clean, scarce specimen. (Est. $200-250)
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176. General Silas Casey by Brady, imprint on verso. Casey (1807-82), a hero of the Mexican War, was made brigadier-general of volunteers in August, 1861, charged with organizing and disciplining the volunteers in and near the capital. He was afterward assigned a division in General Keyes's corps of the Army of the Potomac, and, occupying with it the extreme advance before Richmond, received the first attack of the enemy at Fair Oaks, 31 May, 1862, for which he was brevetted brigadier-general. From 1863-5 he was president of the board for the examination of candidates for officers of Colored troops. A fine CDV. (Est. $100-200)
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177. Dignified portrait of Com. Farragut by Anthony; gold-lined mount with detailed 1862 copyright. (Est. $100-150)
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178. Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-91) in full dress uniform, after he became the Navy's ranking officer in 1870. Photographed by the Brady Studio, imprint on verso. Son of Com. David Porter, Porter was in charge of the Mortar Flotilla during the campaign to capture New Orleans and the lower Mississippi River. He took command of the Mississippi Squadron in October 1862 and led it through the active phase of the Western Rivers campaigns. Rear Admiral Porter spent the last several months of the Civil War in command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Following the War, he was promoted to Vice Admiral in 1866 and served as Superintendent of the Naval Academy. (Five U.S. Navy ships have been named in honor of David Dixon Porter and his father, Commodore David Porter, quite a family record!) A great carte. (Est. $100-150)
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179. Union Naval officer pencil identified on verso "Commodore Slack." Printed credit on verso "Photographed by Davis Brothers, Portsmouth." Rich tone, great detail. (Est. $100-200)
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Inscribed to a fellow officer!

180. A fabulous, detailed carte of a young naval officer posed aboard a ship, leaning against a cannon. He has inscribed the verso to his fellow officer Lieutenant Dahlgren. (We assume to be the son of the famous Commander.) Ship-board naval cartes are extremely rare - this is certainly one of the best to be found! (Est. $350-450)
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181. Three young naval officers, well-attired, cane and swagger-sticks in hand. A fine composition portrait, great detail. (Est. $150-200)
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182. On gold-ruled mount by Brady, NY, the iron-clad Union Gunboat Lafayette under way in waters just above Vicksburg. Documenting the newest technology of warfare was a Brady specialty... including these revolutionary vessels of combat. This is one of the best such photographs. (Est. $400-500)
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183. A rare view of Captain John A. Winslow and Naval officers on the deck of the U.S.S. Kearsarge. Imprint by Seaver of Boston, minor clips to corners, great contrast and detail. (Est. $400-600)
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184. 1864 cadets from the U.S. Naval Academy, posed at ease. These pals no doubt enjoyed their time away from combat exercises to pose in a last group portrait. 1864 canceled revenue stamp, a fun, warm study. (Est. $250-350)
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185. Naval cadets from the Acadamy, posed at ease in Newport, RI. Photo by Black of Boston, imprint on verso, a crisp study of youngsters prepared to go off to fight for their country. Full board, exceptionally rich contrast, a superlative Civil War-era photograph. (Est. $250-350)
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186. A rare Naval Academy photo from Newport, RI. The young cadets stand in formation, drums at the ready for drilling. Clip to two corners of mount, very light foxing/age in background, red-ruled lines on board, imprint on verso of Joshua Williams of Newport. A unique photograph... the first such study we've encountered. (Est. $500-600)
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187. "Illustrations of Camp Life" by Brady. A terrific portrait of a determined looking Union officer, pencil noted on verso "Probably officer of the 4th Michigan Inf." Slight trim to right side of mount, crisp with great contrast to portrait. (Est. $200-300)
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188. Another outdoor scene by Brady in his series of "Illustrations of Camp Life" photographs, 1862, this shows Colonel Dwight reviewing his troops with a tent city visible on the hill in the background. Mount slightly trimmed at sides, a tad light as made, another very rare carte. (Est. $250-300)
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189. Another outdoor scene by Brady in his series of "Illustrations of Camp Life" photographs, 1862. This presents two camp-mates; one posed with a huge, French horn, the other preparing to serve a steak! A fun, unusual portrait... capturing an "off-duty" slice of life! Even, light age, two minor albumen scratches detract little, minor remnants on blank verso from album removal. A very rare, slightly oversized (2 7/8" wide) carte. (Est. $400-600)
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190. Another Brady carte: "Illustrations of Camp Life" photographs, 1862. This example shows two young officers in front of their tent with all the requisite "comforts of home" on display. They proudly display their swords -- well aware of the photographer documenting their "slice of life" scene. A very rare carte. (Est. $400-600)
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191. Another outdoor Brady "Illustrations of Camp Life" photograph. This example shows an extremely young looking officer in front of his tent. Light, with even foxing, another rare CDV. (Est. $250-300)
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192. A fine view showing a group of officers and soldiers posed in front of a farmhouse... no doubt a building of importance in the aftermath of a battle. As noted, outdoor scenes such as this are among the more desirable examples of Civil War photography. Mount trimmed as shown, partial imprint of "J.S. Speight" remains on verso, excellent contrast and tone. (Est. $250-350)
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193. Rare outdoor view of enlisted men posed alongside their tent with flag proudly displayed. Rockwood & Co. Photographers, New York imprint on verso with canceled revenue stamp. A tad light in tone, great composition, full, gold-ruled board. A superior carte photograph. (Est. $300-500)
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194. A horse is a horse, of course, of course! Another great carte from Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 401) with titled label on verso: "Secesh Horse, Whose owner had just been taken prisoner at Cornwallis' Cave, Yorktown." 1862 Brady copyright, tiny clip to corner of albumen at upper right, great detail and contrast. One has to ask... did the horse know he was an enemy combatant? (Est. $300-500)
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195. An extremely rare Civil War scene: "Lew Whitman's Army Mail Wagon in view of Post Office Murfreesboro (TN)." Imprint on verso details this as being issued by "Butler, Bonsall, & Co., Army Photographers, General Rousseau's Division." Someone has hand-titled this CDV, noting on the right edge in tiny print that the "Post Office" was the tent along the right. The delivery of mail would not be disrupted... even in the middle of war!
(Est. $600-800)
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196. Check out those cannonballs! A fabulous advertising carte "The Latest and Best!" with text selling photographs from the War. This shows what would appear to be 19th-century arms merchants standing next to some of their merchandise. A large cannon sits behind the men. From Ohio, gold-ruled, small ink spot on bottom edge of mount, wonderful detail. A great, outdoor photograph. (Est. $300-500)
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197. A great pair of cartes: Capt. James H. Butler of the 32nd N.Y. Vols., tiny clips at corners of mount, by Fredricks of New York, imprint on verso. Together with Capt. Butler (pictured at extreme left) with his company, minor trim to mount. Butler enlisted on 5/14/1861 at New York City as a Captain. Two weeks later he was commissioned into "F" Co. NY 32nd Infantry. He was mustered out two years later at New York. The 32d, the First California regiment, composed of three companies from New York City and several from upstate towns, was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 5th division, Army of Northeastern Virginia. They were engaged at Fairfax Court House, Bull Run, and at Munson Hill, and spent the winter at Fort Ward in Newton's brigade of Franklin's division. In March, 1862, the regiment moved to Manassas; returned to Alexandria and embarked for the Peninsula; was engaged at West Point, in the Seven Days' battles, then went into camp at Harrison's landing until Aug. 16, when it returned to Alexandria. The regiment also participated in the battles of Crampton's Gap, Antietam and Fredericksburg; participated in the "Mud March," and on April 28, 1863, broke camp and joined the light brigade of the 6th corps for the Chancellorsville campaign, in which the 32nd lost 43 members killed, wounded or missing. A wonderful pair documenting this brave unit's service. (Est. $500-700)
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198. An incredible pair: a Brady carte of an Army surgeon at his field office together with a portrait of the doctor by Barnett of New York. Army Surgeon C. Franklin Smith dining with his head nurse outside his tent with affixed sign "Surgeon C.F. Smith." Great tone, contrast, detail, together with a second carte - a detailed study of Smith. Corners of both CDV mounts slightly rounded, a great record!
(Est. $400-600)
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199. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 388) with titled label on verso: "Group of Officers of Gen'l McClellan's Staff." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright on bottom of mount, slightly trimmed mount, overall quite excellent. A scarce carte with fine detail. (Est. $250-350)
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200. Playing dominoes while waiting for the Confederate retreat! 1862 Barnard & Gibson published Brady photograph, pencil titled on verso: "Comte de Paris, Duc de Chartres, Prince de Joinville & friends. Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, May 1, 1862." The French attaches to General McClellan posed for several photographs just three days before the siege of Yorktown, VA, officially ended. Confederate forces, under General Joseph E. Johnston, were routed after a full month of attack by McClellan's forces. The French observers, in American uniforms, enjoyed officer's privileges as official guests of the Army. A rare, important CDV. (Est. $250-350)
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201. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 406) with titled label on verso: "Group. Officers of Cos. A and I 1st Conn. Artillery, Captains Perkin and Gilbert." 1862 Brady copyright on bottom of mount, lightly bumped, minor foxing mostly on mount, fine albumen. These two commanded men in numerous campaigns including action at Yorktown, Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. An evocative study with a forlorn look of dismay on several faces. A scarce carte. (Est. $300-400)
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202. Gen. Stoneman and staff on gold-ruled board by Brady, imprint on verso, minor trim to right side of mount, quite fine. George Stoneman (1822-94), commanded cavalry forces throughout the War leading raids at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Atlanta. While trying to plan an action to free Union prisoners from Andersonville, Stoneman himself was captured by Gen. Wheeler's Raiders, later released in a prisoner exchange. At the end of the War, Stoneman moved to California, became involved in railroads, and served a term as Governor. A rare photo of the General with his officers. (Est. $500-700)
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203. This one is just exceptional! Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 417) with titled label on verso: "12 lb. Howitzer, captured by 17th Regt. N.Y.V., Col. H.S. Lansing. At the Battle of Hanover Court House, from Captain Latham's Rebel Battery; weight 1458 lbs." 1862 Brady copyright on bottom of mount, a richly detailed carte. The soldiers are presented along with their prize. Colonel Henry Seymour Lansing commanded the 17th NY Vol. Infantry, formed on May 29, 1861 for a two year term. His first command took him to Washington to protect the Capital at the outbreak of war. From April to May of 1862, Col. Lansing participated in the Siege of Yorktown (the very place where his grandfather, Col. Gerrit G. Lansing, had fought in the Revolutionary War.) His company later fought in the Seven Days Battles before Richmond VA, was transferred to the Army of the Potomac and became involved in some of the worst Civil War battles, fighting with heavy losses at Second Bull Run, Antietam, Frederickburg and Chancellorsville. At the end of the war, Colonel Lansing - pictured in this portrait at the very center with hat next to tent-pole - was promoted by brevet to Brigadier General for his short command of the Bull Run battlefield. A stunningly fine carte. (Est. $250-350)
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204. Training with ordnance at the U.S. Naval Academy, Newport, R.I. An exceptional carte by J. Williams of Newport, full board, great detail. (Est. $300-400)
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205. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 409) with titled label on verso: "Confederate Fortifications, Yorktown. Armed with Man-of-War Guns." 1862 Brady copyright on bottom of mount, one barely noticeable light crease in field at top, overall quite excellent. The soldiers are presented attending to their cannons... the boredom of routine service more than conveyed. Exceptional contrast and tone. (Est. $250-350)
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206. With Brady's Album Gallery label on verso: "Largest Confederate Gun, (64 pound,) Burst in efforts to reach Battery No. 1 of Gen. McClellan's works." A wonderful example of how the new technology of being able to take photographs in the field was used to document all aspects of the war... even enemy ordnance. Great contrast and tone, quite scarce. (Est. $200-300)
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207. 1862 carte photograph by Brady documenting the "North-East View of Battery No. 1, At Farnhold's House, York River, mounting 5 100-pound and 1 200-pound rifled guns." Another study from Brady's Photgraphic Views of the War, this example also has a thinned backboard from album removal (a separate panel with original title included). The albumen is quite clean and detailed. Alexander Gardner, under employment with Brady, took this photograph while documenting General McClellan's Campaign of the Peninsula. Wonderful tones, crisp details. (Est. $200-300)
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208. 1862 carte of armaments and fortifications at Fort Pulaski, Georgia. Brady imprint at bottom, slight loss to copyright line, a clean albumen photograph. Now maintained by the National Park Service, Fort Pulaski remains a landmark site of the Civil War. In April of 1862, Union troops directed rifled cannon fire at the fort breaching the southeast angle. The quick success of this experimental cannon surprised military strategists. The accuracy and range of the rifled cannon rendered brick fortifications obsolete... forever changing the dynamics of warfare. Immediately after capturing the fort, Union Major General David Hunter, an ardent abolitionist, ordered the release of area slaves. Many were recruited into the Union army comprising the First South Carolina Colored Regiment. A rare carte photograph in excellent condition. (Est. $200-300)
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209. "The 20-inch Gun. Carried on `Blair's' Patent Spring." A great carte combining elements of marketing and wartime enterprise. Label on verso from Blair's Works lists a Wm. Smith as the company's "Traveling Agent." Obviously, a wartime improvement for flatbed railroad cars used to transport heavy equipment and ordnance. Take note of the fellow posed lying inside the mouth of the cannon! Some typical age and wear that detract little. A prohibitively rare carte! (Est. $250-350)
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210. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 375) with titled label on verso: "Battery No. 4 -- Near Yorktown, Mounting 10 13-inch Mortars, each weighing 20,000 pounds." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright on bottom of mount, one light, vertical crease at middle, overall quite excellent. Look at those mortars! 20,000-pounds each? Imagine the carnage they created. There was no end to the fascination with new weaponry... the technology of killing was clearly awe-inspiring. (Est. $200-300)
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211. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 367) with titled label on verso: "Headquarters, Camp Winfield Scott, Near Yorktown, May 3, 1862." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright on bottom of mount, lightly bumped mount corners, great clarity to albumen. Should you wonder why so many photographs were taken in and about Yorktown in early May, 1862, this represented a major victory for Union forces... a fleeting moment as the Rebels delivered a counter-blow just days later. Great detail, rare. (Est. $300-400)
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212. Freed slaves and Black soldiers pose in this extraordinary Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 370) carte! Titled label on verso: "Headquarters Lafayette - Headquarters Gen'l Porter, Farnhold's House and York River in the Distance." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright, absolutely pristine in condition. A truly rare Civil War study. (Est. $300-400)
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213. 1862 carte by Barnard & Gibson documenting the "Confederate Fortifications, Built on the site where Cornwallis delivered up his sword, Yorktown." Another study from Brady's Photgraphic Views of the War, this example also has a thinned backboard from album removal (a separate panel with original title included). The albumen is quite clean and detailed. The Confederate fortifications at Yorktown, Virginia, were reinforced with cotton bales. At this fortification, 15,000 Confederate soldiers under Major General John Magruder kept General McClellan's troops at bay, giving the Confederacy needed time to recruit troops. General Magruder used a ruse of marching his troops around to make McClellan think his force was larger. Magruder eventually abandoned Yorktown on May 4, 1862, but the time gained had been invaluable. Another rare CDV. (Est. $200-300)
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214. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 400) with titled label on verso: "Confederate, Now Federal Quartermaster's Department, Yorktown." 1862 Brady copyright on bottom of mount, light foxing at edges mostly on mount, great clarity to albumen. Interesting that the captured building is shown to have served similar bureaucracies for first the Rebels and then the Yanks! (Est. $250-350)
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215. One of the more desirable photographs from Brady's Album Gallery (this carte detailed as photo No. 497) with titled label on verso: "Wounded U.S. Soldiers from Battle of Gaines' Mill, Intercepted and captured by rebels at Savage Station, VA, June 28, 1862." 1862 Brady copyright, extremely fine and detailed. Gaine's Mill, also known as the "First Cold Harbor", took place on June 27th, resulting in a Confederate victory. Generals Lee and Pickett attacked with about 57,000 men against Gen. Fitz John Porter's 34,000 Union soldiers. Both sides paid heavily, the Union losing about 6,800 and the Confederates nearly 9,000. This was the third of the Seven Days' Battles. Clearly, those on this train paid a heavy price in combat. Exceptional. (Est. $600-800)
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216. One of the best CDVs from Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 395) with titled label on verso: "Shipping 1st Conn. Siege Train at Yorktown. Pier built by Capt. Perkins." 1862 Brady copyright, tiny clip to two corners of mount, very light foxing in background. The vessel Robert Morris is found at the end of the pier with other ships of war visible in the background. A tremendous number of large cannonballs lie assembled in the foreground. A rare carte with rich detail. (Est. $350-500)
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217. A fascinating study: small children on a hill watching seven mounted soldiers in formation. Another in the series from Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 314), titled label on verso: "Sudley Ford, Bull Run, McDowell crossed with Hunter's column to turn the extreme left of the enemy." 1862 copyright, gold-ruled, the group of children include two little boys in their own play uniforms. A rare CDV. (Est. $400-600)
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218. "Lil Mac" slept here! From Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 350) with titled label on verso: "General McClellan's Tent, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, May 1, 1862." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright (publishers working in partnership with Brady using his negatives), fine condition, only light age, excellent tone. (Est. $400-600)
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219. Documenting a necessary consequence of war: burying the dead. An extremely rare Brady photo, light, even age, tremendous contrast and detail. The draped bodies of fallen soldiers are attended to by a burial detail with coffins at the ready. A remarkable carte. (Est. $600-800)
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220. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 407) with titled label on verso: "St. Peter's Church, Yorktown - Built 1717. Where George Washington was married." Light age, minor foxing along edges of mount, rounded corners, 1862 Brady copyright on bottom of mount trimmed. The photograph itself is bold, resonant, and quite detailed. The fascination with historic sites tied to the Founding Fathers and American Revolution was well-documented during the Civil War: Brady captured numerous photographs of soldiers posed at such revered locales. Another rare, outdoor scene. (Est. $200-300)
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221. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 289) with titled label on verso: "Georgetown Aqueduct and College." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright on bottom of mount, slightly bumped corners, overall excellent. The study shows soldiers relaxing... perhaps enjoying leave before being called back to duty. Another great outdoor carte. (Est. $250-350)
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222. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 402) titled on verso: "Principal Landing and Road to Yorktown. Gloucester Opposite." Light age, minor foxing along edge, rounded corners, 1862 Brady copyright on bottom of mount. Numerous ships of war visible in the harbor - this was a major point of demarcation during various campaigns. Another rare, outdoor scene documenting aspects of the war. (Est. $250-350)
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223. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 369) with titled label on verso: "Headquarters of Gen'l Lafayette Before the Battle of Yorktown." The group, including African American servants and soldiers, most likely saw to the upkeep of this property... about to see so much carnage. A rare CDV, light, typical age, overall fine. (Est. $300-400)
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224. The levee in Donaldsonville, Louisiana with Federal "teamsters" in the foreground and pontoon wharfs in the background. Photographer's imprint by McPherson & Oliver of Baton Rouge. Slight clip to corners, blue rules at top and bottom, a rare photograph in carte format. (Est. $250-350)
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225. To quote members of the 5th Dimension, "Up, up and away... My beautiful, my beautiful balloon!" A rare, 1862 carte from Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 427) with titled label on verso: "Prof. Lowe reconnoitering at Battle of Fair Oaks, And telegraphing to McClellan's Headquarters." Slightly light, full board, quite rare outdoor scene. This photograph was taken May 31, 1862 with Lowe ascending in his hot air balloon, Intrepid. In the October 26, 1861 issue of Harper's, an article on balloons stated their use in combat was first seen in 1859 in the Italian War. Lowe proved the value of this new technology... but didn't impact battleplans very much. Another rare outdoor study! (Est. $500-700)
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226. Another outdoor scene published by Brady in his series of "Illustrations of Camp Life" photographs, 1862. This presents Company G of the 12th New York Volunteers. Mount clipped at left corners, great detail with soldiers posed displaying their weapons at the ready - drummer on the far left flank prepared to call the men to action. A very rare carte. (Est. $400-600)
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227. 1862 carte photograph by Barnard & Gibson documenting the "Ruins of Mrs. Henry's House, Bull Run. In this vicinity the battle raged fiercest." Several armed combatants survey the scene with two posed for the camera. Cataloged as image #320, Brady's Photgraphic Views of the War, this example has a thinned backboard from album removal (a separate panel with original title included). The albumen is quite clean and detailed - an intriguing presentation of the destructive force of war. (Est. $200-300)
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228. A richly contrasted photo of Fort Snelling. Snelling played an integral part in the development of the Northwest... a lone symbol of American ambition in the wilderness. The U.S. gained control over the Upper Mississippi Valley in the Revolutionary War - and after the War of 1812, took physical possession of the valuable Northwest frontier by establishing a chain of Indian agencies and supporting forts from Lake Michigan to the Missouri River. Fort Snelling was completed in 1825, and under Col. Josiah Snelling tamed a great deal of the frontier and became the hub of the Upper Mississippi and the meeting place of diverse Indian and foreign traders. Between 1861-5, Minnesota expanded the fort as a training center for thousands of volunteers who joined the Union Army. After the war, the regular Army returned. Fort Snelling became headquarters and supply base for the military Dept. of Dakota, which extended from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. Regulars from Snelling served in the Indian campaigns and in the Spanish-American War of 1898. During World War Two, Fort Snelling processed over 300,000 inductees and trained soldiers in duties from operating railroads to speaking Japanese. At war's end the old fort was finally closed and turned over to the Veteran's Admin. A fine photograph on untitled carte board. (Est. $200-250)
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229. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 407) with titled label on verso: "Clark's House - Regiment Hospital for the Reserve - Lafayette's Headquarters." One spot of loss to label on verso from album removal, 1862 Barnard & Gibbons copyright on bottom of mount, overall quite excellent. Once again, a Yorktown scene that shows Civil War usage of a historic site... a field hospital in what was Lafayette's headquarters! Another rare, outdoor scene. (Est. $175-225)
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230. Brady's Album Gallery (photo No. 360) titled on verso: "Farnhold's House, with part of Federal Battery, No. 1, on York River." 1862 Barnard & Gibson copyright on bottom of mount. A clean specimen of a rare carte. (Est. $200-300)
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231. A vivid carte of the Morris Island Range Beacon, South Carolina. The beacon was captured by Northern forces and used by Union sharpshooters. The building soon drew fire from Confederate batteries and the photograph shows the result. The photograph was taken by Sam A. Cooley, 10th Army Corps (no photographer's imprint), and shows the wood frame structure still standing after the assault. Viewed closely, the photographer's wagon can be seen at right. Excellent condition. (Est. $250-300)
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232. A patriotic youth! A wonderful carte by J. Cady of Canal Street, New York City. A serene looking boy rests his arm on Old Glory while posed with a large gun. A great photograph that captures the spirit of the day. (Est. $150-200)
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233. Could he be any younger? An armed, Union militia cadet by Rockwood, NY. Full, gold-ruled board, red tinting to flag in background as well as the boy's lips and cheeks. Great detail and focus - a boy his age should be posed with anything BUT the dress/equipment of war. (Est. $100-150)
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234. Watch him blow! Richly-detailed CDV of a military flutist - instrument in hand... so to speak! Full, gold-ruled board, nice contrast, a fun photo. (Est. $100-200)
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235. An incredible piece of history: a signed photograph of German-American Louis Kempff, a carte portrait taken just a week after his first promotion! Acting Midshipman Kempff of Illinois entered the Navy in 1857. He graduated the Naval Academy in 1862 as a Lieutenant. A distinguished officer, he was later promoted to Lieutenant Commander (just after the war); Commander, 1876; Captain, 1891; and Rear-Admiral in 1899. His Civil War service was quite varied including command of a paddle-wheel boat retrofitted with ten large guns. During the Spanish American War, he commanded operations in one fleet engagement. He was the ranking American officer on the scene in China (1900) during the height of the Boxer Rebellion conflict. Aboard the U.S. Newark, Rear Admiral Kempff, had his hands tied by a U.S. government directive stating that he was not authorized to engage in hostile acts against the Chinese. But as Assistant Commander of the Asiatic Station, he helped land reinforcements to relieve the legations under siege by the Boxers at Peking. A presentation carte inscribed by Louis Kempff on both front and verso. Imprint by C.D. Fredricks. (Kempff's journals and papers are now found in the Illinois State Historical Library.) Pristine condition, most likely a unique item! (Est. $300-500)
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236. A Medal of Honor recipient for "Conspicuous bravery in battle." Second Lieutenant Charles Dearborn Copp of New Hampshire, later Massachusetts. Copp (1840-1912), fought in Company C, 9th New Hampshire Infantry. In action at Fredericksburg, VA, December 1862, Copp - as detailed in his M.O.H. Citation - "Seized the regimental colors, the color bearer having been shot down, and, waving them, rallied the regiment under a heavy fire." He was promoted 1st Lieut. in1863 and Captain in 1864. He was mustered out on 6/10/1865 at Alexandria, VA. A wonderful carte, canceled revenue stamp on verso. (Est. $300-400)
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237. Exceptional Brady carte of a true hero, William Dwight, Jr. Brigadier-general Dwight (1831-88), a cadet at the U.S. Military Acad., 1849-53, resigned before graduation to engage in manufacturing in Boston. He was commissioned captain in the 13th U. S. infantry, May 14, 1861. In June he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 70th N.Y. Vols., of which Daniel E. Sickles was colonel. At the battle of Williamsburg, where his regiment lost half its men, he was twice wounded, left for dead on the field, and taken prisoner. He was exchanged, and for gallantry was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers, Nov. 29, 1862, assigned to the 1st brigade of Grover's division, which he led in the attack on Port Hudson. For his bravery on this occasion he was appointed member of the commission to receive the surrender of Confederate forces. He was chief of staff to Gen. Banks in the Red River expedition after May, 1864, and in July of that year was assigned to the command of the 1st division, 19th army corps, with which he rendered important service under Sheridan in the campaign of the Shenandoah valley, notably at Winchester, Fisher's hill and Cedar creek. A great CDV, Brady imprint on verso. (Est. $150-200)
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238. Handsome carte-matted tintype of a uniformed Union soldier. Ornate, embossed mount, light red tinting to cheeks, identified on verso as "Uncle Amos." Quite fine. (Est. $150-200)
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239. Ready for combat! A great carte of a fully-armed Union soldier, posed in front of a painted backdrop, gun in hand and accoutrements displayed in his belt. An interesting testament to soldiers wanting to document their service for God and country! (Est. $200-300)
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A young law student who died from wounds received while fighting with the 20th Mass.
240. A solemn, carte portrait of the young William Lowell Putnam, 2nd Lt., 20th MA Vols. Putnam, a 21 year old law student in Boston, saw his duty and enlisted. He was commissioned into Co. E on July 22, 1861. Three months later - to the very day - he died from wounds received in combat at Ball's Bluff. Sad, quite sad. Slight trim to top of mount, exceptional contrast and clarity. (Est. $400-500)
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241. A fine CDV of George Conery, standing in the ornate lobby of the American House Hotel in Glen Falls, NY. During the War, Conery was the proprietor of this impressive, three-story hotel. On the East side was a two-story porch where stage coaches would stop for the benefit of the passengers coming from Lake George and the North before continuing their journey on the train. Conery was a major donor to the "Civil War Patriot Fund" - pledges went to the families of volunteers and to "maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union and the perpetuity of our Government." A nice, period portrait. (OPEN)
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His father, a sharp Lincoln critic, danced with the First Lady!
242. A wonderful carte by Silsbee, Case, & Co., of George Blagden. Blagden (1835-1905), son of Boston's influential Reverend G.W. Blagden, graduated from Harvard in 1856 and was admitted to the bar three years later. Hearing the patriotic call, Blagden enlisted in 1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant serving with the A Co., MA 1st Cavalry through January 1863. He was promoted to Captain, 2nd Mass. Cavalry, then Major in February 1864.Blagden rose to the rank of Colonel before resigning his commission in April 1865. Blagden and his company took part in the Chancellorsville campaign, was engaged at Rapidan Station, and Warrenton Road, and Brandy Station, serving as rear-guard at the opening of the Gettysburg campaign. His men were heavily engaged at Aldie Court House, accompanied the 6th corps on its march to Gettysburg, and after the battle returned to Westminster with a body of Confederate prisoners. During the remainder of the year they were incessantly on the move, scouting, skirmishing, and engaging in the exacting and arduous duties demanded of this arm of the service. They were also engaged in various raids and expeditions in southeastern Virginia; later defeated by Mosby's men in a fight at Mount Zion Church near Aldie, Va. Operating against General Early in July, 1864, during the latter's raid toward Washington, the 2d Cavalry was engaged at Fort Stevens. Following in pursuit of the enemy, after the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond, on the 6th of April, Blagden's company participated in the battle of Sailor's Creek. On the evening of April 8, 1865, they assisted in the capture of Lee's supply trains at Appomattox Station, and on the following morning was with the troops which stopped the further progress of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. After the war, Blagden joined the NYC firm of George Dexter & Co. (cotton buyers); this later became George Blagden & Co. He retired from the firm in 1881 and joined the firm of Chase and Higginson, stock brokers. Now... an interesting component to the Blagden story centers on his father, G.W. Blagden. The elder Blagden, one of Boston's "leading citizens," was one of the Managers of Boston's October 18, 1860 "The Prince of Wales Ball" held in his honor during his visit to the States. The best of Washington and Boston society attended. We know that Mrs. Lincoln danced a quadrille with the 19 year old prince... and believe that Blagden enjoyed a similar pleasure! Oddly, the Reverend constantly exuded sympathy with the Confederate cause - with rhetoric that could be labeled "Copperhead." Blagden's sympathies in these matters are puzzling indeed, particularly given that he married the elder sister of that most fiery of abolitionists, Wendell Phillips! Blagden was labeled by peers as "a semi-traitor;" castigated for disloyalty for calling on members of his congregation to vote against Lincoln in 1864. The Minister refused to read Lincoln's Thanksgiving proclamations and when the Confederacy surrendered in April, 1865, as recounted in the diary of a fellow minister, as ebullient and joyous congregations gathered at the church, George Blagden's sour sentiments "nearly drove people out of the house." A unique item to be sure! (Est. $100-200)
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243. Civil War soldier and double amputee Alfred A. Stratton of the 147th New York Infantry. Stratton is wearing a 9-button shell jacket with sleeves pinned as his arms have been amputated from being severely wounded at Petersburg, VA in 1864. At 18, Stratton enlisted on 8/19/63 from Ellicott, NY as a private. He was mustered into Co. G, 147th N.Y. Infantry, later promoted to sergeant. He was discharged as a result of his injuries on 9/27/64. A rather stark and bleak image of a Union soldier who gave so much. (Est. $150-200)
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244. About the cleanest, most pristine example found. The infamous Libby Prison presented in a carte by Selden & Co. of Richmond. Detailed history and legend on verso, crisp mount, rich tone and detail. An excellent specimen. (Est. $400-600)
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"If there ever was a hell on Earth,
Elmira Prison was that hell..."
245. The Elmira camp, built in upstate New York at the outset of the war as a general recruiting depot, was converted into a prison camp in 1864. Even though it functioned for but one year, Elmira had the highest death rate, per capita, of any prison camp - Federal or Confederate - with a 24% casualty rate. The ill-equipped and poorly-conceived prison was particularly harsh during the winter months with bitter-cold temperatures taking a heavy toll. Vastly over-crowded, the barracks designed to accommodate but a fraction of those interned, new-arrivals were given tents... poor defense against the weather. The Commandant of Elmira did what he could to improve conditions... only to be rebuffed. Washington ignored or denied repeated requisitions for badly needed medicines. Even an urgent request for straw on which the sick could lay was ignored. Insufficient food, provisions, clothing, and related deprivations, outbreaks of scurvy and typhoid, resulted in scandalous losses. Of a total of 12,122 Confederate soldiers imprisoned in Elmira, 2,933 died of sickness, exposure, and associated causes. Elmira was a national disgrace and a Union shame. A rare carte photograph of prisoners lined up in formation. Interestingly, the point where the photograph was taken also represents an indignity delivered upon the prisoners. Two large viewing stands were built outside the camp walls and locals paid 15-cents to climb the platform and gawk at those suffering in the compound. Minor clips to corners, excellent tone and detail. (Est. $300-500)
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246. With copyright by the town's photographer! Another rare carte of the infamous Elmira Prison. This example has an imprint of the local photographer, Moulton & Larkin of Elmira. Canceled revenue stamp on verso, slight clip to corners, a great overview of the camp taken from one of the two viewing platforms. A sad reminder that there were those who profited from other's misery... selling "souvenir photographs" of a shameful place. An extremely rare CDV. (Est. $400-600)
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A remarkable piece of sports history...
A Confederate baseball team!

247. Civil War-era carte-de-visite photograph of a Southern baseball team. From an album obtained from the Butler family of Warrenton, Virginia, this incredible CDV is accompanied by a copy-image of a youthful Confederate soldier from the same family album - identified as Harrison Butler. (That carte retained by the family.) The CDV of the baseball team originated in the same family album with Harrison pictured as one of the "WBBC" players. (An "x" is marked above the lad.) The ten-member team is pictured with bats, the team record book, two pennants and team blouses with their sports logo. Old waterstain/ink marking at top and over the young ball-boy as shown, insignificant small clip to albumen at bottom corner. A rare opportunity to own a unique piece of 19th century Virginia sports ephemera as most such Confederate material was consumed in the course of the War! (Provenance: Josh Leland.) (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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[The following fifteen silverprint photographs come from the famed Meserve collection. Frederick Hill Meserve, 1865-1962, considered America's first great collector of photography, purchased negatives from Mathew Brady's studio in 1902 - glass negatives that Brady had been forced to give to E. & H.T. Anthony to repay a debt. Meserve acquired approximately 10,000 Civil War era negatives. Beginning at about the turn-of-the century and up through the 1930s, Meserve personally made cartes such as these from the original negatives. Each includes Meserve's printed legend "Collection of Americana Frederick Hill Meserve, New York" on the verso. Each study also has Meserve's hand-penned identification on the verso. Each CDV is in excellent condition; many are extremely rare and difficult to source.]

248. Ink identified by Meserve "Photo by Hesler, Chicago June 1860". (Est. $200-400)
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249. Titled by Meserve "Photo probably by Brady N.Y. Feb 27-1860." (Est. $200-400)
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250. Titled by Meserve "Photo Wenderoth & Taylor Phila. About 1864." (Est. $200-400)
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251. Titled by Meserve "Photo by A. Gardner Wash. Early in 1863." (Est. $200-400)
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252. Titled by Meserve "Ferrotype, 1856 or 1857 place and maker unknown." (Est. $200-400)
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253. Titled by Meserve "Ambrotype, Monmouth, Ill Oct. 2, 1858, maker unknown." (Est. $200-400)
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254. Titled by Meserve "Ambrotype, about 1853 maker and place unknown." (Est. $200-400)
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255. Titled by Meserve "Photo by C.S. German Springfield, Ill. 1860." (Est. $200-400)
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256. Titled by Meserve "Photo, Springfield Ill. Late in 1860 maker unknown." (Est. $200-400)
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257. Titled by Meserve "Ambrotype, Springfield Ill. Aug 13, 1860, maker unknown." (Est. $200-400)
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258. Titled by Meserve "Photo by Alexander Gardner Washington, Nov 8, 1863." (Est. $200-400)
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259. Titled by Meserve "Ambrotype said to have been made by Pearson, Macomb, Ill. Aug 27, 1858." (Est. $200-400)
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260. Titled by Meserve "Photo by C.S. German Springfield Ill. Jan 26, 1861." (Est. $200-400)
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261. Titled by Meserve "Photo by Brady Washington, about 1864." (Est. $200-400)
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262. Titled by Meserve "In Gen McClellan's Tent detail of photo by Brady, Antietam, mid Oct., 1862." (Est. $200-400)
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263. From the original Brady negative, a shot of little Tad in his very own uniform (given to the boy by P.T. Barnum). Printed by Meserve, a 2 x 3 1/2" silverprint that would present well when properly matted. A period carte would command well in excess of $3,000. This should well be worth... (Est. $100-300)
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264. Group of seven (7) Meserve photographs. Similar to those detailed above, these were never mounted. Each measures 2 x 3" overall and are quite clean. (Est. $300-400)
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