POLITICALS

PART I (Lots 452-543)

CLICK HERE FOR PART II (Lots 544-673)


The Ultimate! One of the three finest Lincoln portrait flags extant.


452. The best Lincoln campaign item we have been privileged to handle - a large Lincoln portrait campaign flag. Unlisted and unpublished, this 15 x 25" textile has a sober and "backwoodsy" portrait of Lincoln within a canton of thirteen stars. Archivally framed to 29 x 18" overall. Large block lettering LINCOLN AND HAMLIN. in black on the middle white stripes. Some scattered light stains and soiling, especially along the right side. Colors are strong and unfaded. A blockbuster centerpiece for any Lincoln collection! Recently found hidden behind a wall in a mid-western house undergoing renovation!
(Est. $50,000-60,000 )
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453. As we are quite fond of pointing out, campaign material from 1864 is difficult to obtain. This is particularly so with anything large and colorful - such as this magnificent textile from that monumental election. Let us remind you: the War was raging hot in 1864. Grant is in constant skirmishes with Lee's forces in the Virginia Wilderness. Not until March does the President appoint Ulysses as Commander-in-Chief of the armies and not until September, when Sherman takes Atlanta, does the tide seem to turn. In fact, up to this point, Lincoln was quite certain he would lose the election. He made each of his Cabinet Members sign a blind oath to support the new administration. Whether it was wartime deprivations or the unseemliness of an all-out campaign while boys were dying on the battlefield, the 1864 election produced very little memorabilia - save for small items of ephemera. The number of extant campaign flags from 1864 is nominal... just a fraction of those seen from 1860. (Unlike a spurious "Lincoln and Johnson" name flag to recently hit the market, this is the real McCoy!) Andrew Johnson, a War Democrat from Tennessee, was the only Southern senator from a seceding state to remain loyal to the Union. Lincoln, in an effort to secure that state early in the war, appointed Johnson military governor. Johnson was likewise chosen to be his 1864 running-mate to help "shore up" the Union ticket. As it turned out, Lincoln won with 91% of the electoral vote. (The popular vote, however, was relatively close with Lincoln and Johnson receiving 2.2 million to 1.8 million for the McClellan ticket.) Measuring 33 x 23", beautiful archival framing to measure 36 x 26" overall, this relic retains rich, vibrant colors. (A similar example in slightly better condition sold in the Heritage auction last June for $30,000.) The age darkening and fabric loss along the right margin adds to the feel of this relic - an evocative item that displays quite well given the tremendous size. A rarity of significance.
(Est. $12,000-18,000 )
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An 1840 presidential poll-book: Lincoln as electoral candidate with votes by many close New Salem associates. An important document.
454. Manuscript pollbook recording the votes cast at the presidential election in "Petersburg precinct" of Menard County, Ill., 2 November 1840. Comprised of three double-folio sheets, folded vertically to make 12 folio tallysheet pages, each of which has the names of the presidential electoral candidates penned vertically in columns at the top of the page. Voters' names are written along the left side of each sheet, with slashmarks in the appropriate columns indicating their choices. The "Van Buren electors"include later Union General John McClernand while the "Harrison electors" are Abraham Lincoln, Buckner S. Morris, Sam Marshall, E.B. Webb and Cyrus Walker (the latter four all close associates of Lincoln in the political, legal, and/or legislative arenas). Some 150 votes are recorded -- not all of the pages needed to be used -- with 86 going to Van Buren's electors and 64 to Lincoln and his colleagues, an outcome which reflected the statewide trend. Van Buren swept Illinois, as did every Democratic presidential candidate until Lincoln's own Republican candidacy in 1860.
This rare pollbook reflects the very first time that Lincoln ever contended for an office of national significance -- he would run for presidential elector several more times, lastly in 1856 -- but it is even more remarkable and historically significant because it records the votes of some of his most important friends and neighbors from New Salem, the frontier community where he had come to maturity. Petersburg, which Lincoln helped to survey and which became the seat of newly-created Menard County in 1839, superseded and effectively absorbed old New Salem. By 1840 New Salem had ceased to exist; a great many of its residents moved to Petersburg, some literally taking their cabins and business buildings with them. Lincoln continued to attend to lawsuits for his old neighbors at the Petersburg court house until his Presidency, and they always remained a prized link in his chain of political contacts; as he once wrote, "my old friends of Menard who have known me longest and best, stick to me." Among those voting for Lincoln are: Pleasant Armstrong (a member of Lincoln's Black Hawk War company; in 1848 was co-purchaser of the acreage at Huron, Ill. owned by Lincoln); Jesse Gum (for whom Lincoln did some of his earliest surveying work, in 1834); John A. "Jack" Kelso (famed as New Salem's ne'er-do-well "village philosopher" who strengthened, if he did not inspire, Lincoln's love for Robert Burns and Shakespeare; Lincoln boarded with him on occasion; Kelso once bested the Trent brothers in a lawsuit over a hog, which supposedly was Lincoln's first "court appearance" for a "client" -- although not yet a licensed attorney, he argued for the Trents); Joshua Miller (New Salem blacksmith and wheelwright; brother-in-law of Jack Kelso); James Short (famed for buying and returning to Lincoln his surveying equipment when it was seized to satisfy a court judgment which arose from his ill-fated storekeeping venture; said to have hosted Lincoln on his visits to Ann Rutledge, whose family had moved into Short's neighborhood; when President, Lincoln gave the impoverished Short an appointment as an Indian agent in California); Bowling Green (local justice of the peace who encouraged Lincoln's interest in the law and loaned him books); James M. Rutledge (apparently J. McGrady Rutledge, a cousin of Ann, who as a boy helped construct New Salem's dam and Rutledge tavern); David Rutledge (brother of Ann; a member of Lincoln's Black Hawk War company; first lawyer in Menard County, occasionally involved in cases with Lincoln; once co-defendant with him over a land conveyance Rutledge had made while a minor and lacking clear title, Lincoln being surety on the transaction; name given in this document and in many published sources as David "M." although he himself seems to have always written it David "H."); Matthew S. Marsh (author of a series of letters that lend very rare, and perhaps the best, contemporary color to our knowledge of New Salem; he called Lincoln a "very clever fellow", careless about leaving his post office open and unattended, but "accommodating", even to the point that he illegally free-franked one of Marsh's letters) ; Martin Waddell (New Salem hatter involved with numerous Lincoln petitions); William McNeely (New Salem bricklayer and plasterer; Lincoln did surveys for him in 1835 and attended to lawsuits for him as late as 1858, including one for McNeely's failure to perform his duty as a Menard supervisor); and Bennett Abell (loaned Lincoln books in New Salem; Mrs. Abell, a sister of Mary Owens, was instrumental in her ill-fated "love affair" with Lincoln). Among those voting against Lincoln are: Alex Ferguson (New Salem shoemaker who in 1833 co-signed Lincoln's bond to serve as postmaster of the town); Peter Elmore (who witnessed a deed along with Lincoln in September 1832); Thomas Watkins (stock raiser at Clary's Grove, said to have sold Lincoln the horse he rode while a surveyor); Jacob Garber (for whose son Lincoln, while a Congressman in 1848, secured a West Point cadetship); and Royal Clary (a member of Lincoln's Black Hawk company). Many other listed voters, who await certain identification, bear well-known New Salem/Menard County names such Nance, Cogdal, Beekman, Goldsby, Potter, Summers. Spears, Elmore, Purviance, and Hoheimer. Several unidentified Clarys (including John Clary Jr.) are shown among the anti-Lincoln voters; they belonged to the clan which founded "Clary's Grove", home of the rowdies who plagued early New Salem and whose champion, Jack Armstrong, proved Lincoln's mettle in a legendary wrestling match. The pollbook is personally signed as justice of the peace by A.D. Wright, Petersburg merchant, judge, and Mexican War captain. An ardent admirer of Stephen Douglas, Wright supposedly gave the middle name "Douglas" to all of his children, including author Carrie Douglass Wright. (Est. $14,000-16,000 )
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A rare relic from "Abram" Lincoln's first attempt at national office!
455. Three leaves comprising a Morgan County, IL, poll book from the national election of 1840: "Poll Book for Meredosia Precinct, Nov. 1840." (Morgan County is Southwest of Springfield.) Prior to his election as President in 1860, Lincoln was a determined party functionary, actively campaigning for Whig Presidential candidates in every general election from 1840 to 1856. Not only did he barnstorm the country giving speeches, but he was a candidate for Presidential Elector on numerous occasions - the very first being in 1840. In that campaign, he also had occasion to debate Stephen Douglas for the first time. Lincoln supported William Henry Harrison, Douglas was an advocate for the incumbent, Martin Van Buren. These poll books had pre-printed pages with the names of Whig and Democratic Presidential Electors. The last column has the name of "Abram Lincoln". Under their names, election clerk has noted the choices of each voter. A tally of the votes received is written on the final page, on the bottom. Being a Democratic state, the Van Buren slate of electors received many more votes than the Whig slate. Accordingly, Lincoln failed in his attempt to be elected a Presidential Elector. Despite numerous attempts, this is one office that eluded Lincoln his entire career. Still, the experience gained in this and future national elections would prove invaluable in Lincoln's journey toward the White House and immortality. Single leaves from 1840 poll books seldom surface and when they do they command high prices. This is, to our knowledge, complete for this precinct. Housed in a magnificent custom, archival frame that beautifully displays all three leaves.
(Est. $2,000-3,000 )
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456. The machinery of the U.S. Government gurantees a
SINGLE soldier's vote! Partly printed "POLL-BOOK" (so titled in large letters on cover) used to record soldiers' absentee votes in the Presidential election of 8 November 1864, used at "Camp, Defenses of the James" (James River, Va.); 6 pages (3 leaves), oblong giant folio. One page bears the oaths of 5 election judges and clerks, who sign every sheet. The sole voter, A.P. Steckel, of Washington Twp., Lehigh Co., has cast his ballot for the Presidential electoral ticket headed by Morton McMichael. Steckel belonged to the 211th Pennsylvania, which took part in the final assault and fall of Petersburg and in the Appomattox Campaign that cornered Robert E. Lee and ended the Civil War (Apr. 3-9, 1865). Some small edge chips and starting folds, but good. (Est. $150-300 )
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457. One of the great rarities in political campaign torches...this one always considered having been developed for the early Lincoln Presidential rallies, circa 1860/64. Certainly among the most desired of all the political campaign torches. Handsome, large, all brass eagle (about 9 inches wide by 10 inches high overall). Made in two die stamped brass sections with large hollow center section and a small brass oil lamp inset at the top of each hollow wing with the wicks still intact. Very deep age patina to the brass and original untouched uncleaned condition and would rate as exc. +. Completely authentic with about 90% of its original gilt. Most handsome and exceedingly rare piece of Americana. These type items were meant to be carried on a long wooden pole affixed to a swivel top to keep them always upright. One side of the support bracket is loose, else quite nice. Very few have ever turned up and especially in this exceptional condition... last year's example sold for almost $9,000. (Est. $3,000-5,000 )
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458. A wood rifle-torch for parades, affixed with a provenance label bearing the words "'Wide Awake's Parade Torch, Mohawk, N.Y. 1861". Measuring 64" in length, the barrel has a small opening allowing the wire holding the oil reservoir to be easily removed from the rifle. Normal wear, aging. A fun display piece! (Est. $400-600 )
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459. The definitive study: Political Campaign Torches by Herbert R. Collins. (Smithsonian Press, Washington: 1964.) 44pp., profusely illustrated with examples of just about every known torch used in parades and rallies along with great illustrations of period advertising of same. Long out of print... a necessary addition to your reference shelf. (OPEN )
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460. A wonderful, metal ballot box (or, should we say "ballot barrel?"). 14.5 x 12 " with decorative red designs on top and at each end, remnants of white text on sides. This ballot box was manufactured by George Barnard & Co. of St. Louis, circa 1868 - just in time for supporting Grant's first campaign (political campaign, that is!). Normal wear. Would look great in your political display!
(Est. $400-600 )
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From the Little Giant's home town - Opposition to his candidacy!


461. Wide Awaked in Brandon! A true rarity, the only matched pair of Wide Awake broadsides known to be extant. These two broadsides, each approximately 12.5 x 10", announce Wide Awake meetings in Brandon, Vermont for October 30, 1860 and November 1, 1860. The first, dated October 24, 1860 exhorts: "WIDE AWAKE! All who are favorable to the organization of a Band of 'Wide Wakes' in Brandon are requested to meet at the TOWN HALL, THIS EVENING, AT 7 1/2 O'CLOCK, to hear the report of the committee, and to perfect a plan of organization. Citizens from adjoinings [sic] towns are earnestly invited to attend...". The second broadside, also from Brandon, October 30, 1860 begins with the header: "REPUBLICANS ATTEND!! The Republicans of the town of Brandon are requested to meet at the TOWN HALL, THURSDAY EVENING, NOV. 1st. '60. for the purpose of making arrangements to secure a full vote, at the coming Presidential Election, which comes off on TUESDAY NEXT..." Ironically, Stephen A. Douglas was born in this Vermont hamlet in 1813 and spent much of his childhood here apprenticing as a cabinetmaker. Each archivally reinforced on verso with Japanese tissue, typical age wear from original mounting does very little to detract from this bright and boldly printed pair of broadsides.
(Est. $4,000-5,000. )
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An
extremely rare 1864 jugate broadside!


462. Published by H.H. Lloyd of New York, hand-colored with reds and blues, the Republican candidates are presented in this medium-folio print labeled as "No. 37" and simply titled with their names. Lloyd is best known for his oversized "Campaign Charts" that presented the platforms and likenesses of all the candidates in 1860 and 1864... huge, glazed charts that adorned meeting halls and classrooms. This interesting broadside, with the same portraits as the charts, was never issued as a newspaper supplement or centerfold but as a distinct campaign print similar to that published by Currier & Ives. Archivally matted and framed to 20 x 16 1/2" overall with the print measuring 14 x 10 1/2" (sight), there appears to be some conservation/restoration present along the edges where some minor dampstains and wrinkles are present as shown. There is the slightly visible notation of "1865" written into the bottom of print and a line of handwritten text slightly visible at the very top. The colors are rich and vibrant with the war eagle surrounded by patriotic bunting. This is special in that it is possibly unique (a prototype?). NO... we've never seen another, from 1864. This is a rather different Lincoln portrait, less-oft seen. Lloyd's copyright line at bottom reveals that this was NOT part of a larger item. Not examined out of frame. A desirable display piece! (Est. $3,000-5,000 )
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463. Excellent McClellan & Pendleton campaign broadside! Fine 12 x 17" broadside announcing a "Democratic Meeting!" illustrated with an eagle holding ribbons proclaiming "McClellan and Pendleton." Below, the text reads: "The Democracy of Ecorse will meet at C. M. Thompson's Hotel, On Thursday, Nov. 3d, at 4 o'clock P.M. Eloquent Speakers! Both French and English, will be in attendance. Turn Out, One & All!" Ecorse is a town in Michigan, close to Detroit and just across from the Canadian border... hence the presence of those speaking French! Some light damp stains along top and right edges, slight loss at top, else quite fine... and showy! (Est. $2,500-3,000 )
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464. Large, 12 x 19" campaign broadside emphasizing part of Confederate Vice President Stephens's address to the Georgia Secession Convention, printed to dissuade Democrats from supporting McClellan in 1864: "There are many well-meaning men in the party called DEMOCRATS, who, through party spirit, have allowed themselves to seem to be committed in favor of the Peace-and-Secession Doctrine of the men whom they have permitted to become their leaders. To such men we recommend a careful perusal of the following extract from a speech made by ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS,... He showed clearly that the South had no just cause of complaint, and predicted what would be the consequences of the terrible act. Mr. STEPHENS has since yielded to the spirit of party, against which he so long struggled, but his defection does not disprove his own arguments, the truth of which every day is demonstrating by the painful logic of fact...." Small archival tape repair on verso, a fine and quite scarce political piece.
(Est. $300-500 )
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465. A wonderful political broadside, 8 3/4 x 11 1/4", comparing the 1864 Republican and Democratic platforms in regard to fighting the rebellion, slavery, and related issues. It points out the differences that make the Republicans the "sound" party of choice: "...the Union is to be maintained `by quelling by force of arms'... while the Democrat contemplates peace through the virtual triumph of the traitors." (Did the great political strategist Karl Rove write this?) The circular states "The Union Platform regards the Rebellion as flagrantly wrong...The Democratic, on the other hand, has no word of condemnation for the treason, nor of reproof for its authors." Very fine condition. (Est. $400-600 )
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466. WHITE SLAVES! A spectacular broadside printed in the wake of the New York draft riots, warning against copperhead agitation and urging New Yorkers to remain true to the Union. Measures 12 x 18.5" (sight), 17 x 23.5" overall, boldly titled "WHITE SLAVES" and signed "A Democratic Workingman", features a long quote from an 1858 speech by South Carolina Sen. James Hammond: "...The man who lives by daily labor, and scarcely lives at that, and who has to put out his labor in the market, and take the best he can get for it --- in short, your whole class of manual laborers and operatives, as you call them, are SLAVES. The difference between us is, that our slaves are hired for life, and well compensated; there is no starvation, no begging, no want of employment among our people, and not too much employment either. Yours are hired by the day.... YOUR SLAVES ARE WHITE, OF YOUR OWN RACE--- you are brothers, of one blood. Our slaves do not vote. We give them no political power. If they knew the tremendous secret, that the ballot-box is stronger than an army with bayonets, where would you be? ---Your society would be reconstructed...Not by meetings in parks, with arms in their hands, but by the peaceful process of the ballot box.'..." The Democratic Workingman concludes: "The law-abiding and union-loving workingmen of the Union---whom the Senator denounces as 'White Slaves,' went to the ballot-box, according to the Constitution, and effected 'a peaceful revolution.' but the 'gentlemen' traitors of the South, less loyal and less honest, went 'with arms in their hands,' and treason in their hearts, and have compelled workingmen of the South to rise against their brothers of the North, in order to make 'white slaves' of them all.... These things being true, I charge, 1st. That the rebellion of the South Carolina traitors is an attempt to destroy the interests of the democratic working classes of the Union. 2d. That it is an effort to build up forever a system by which 'Capital shall own Labor.' 3d. That it is an attempt to make slavery---and property in slaves---the controlling interest of the Union. 4th. That Slavery is, and from its nature must be, the deadly enemy of Free Labor. 5th. that the success of the traitors will be a death-blow to the interest of Free Workingmen, North and South. 6th. that self-interest and patriotism both call upon Workingmen to stand by the government firm as a rock till the rebellion is put down, and peace restored by the constitutional authorities..." He concludes by challenging Mayor Fernando Wood and other prominent Democrats to disprove his quotes/conclusions. A fascinating piece vividly illustrating the complexities of New York politics during the war, with many racial overtones. Usual folds, clean. Matted, not examined out of frame. (Est. $800-1,200 )
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Pro-Lincoln, anti-Copperhead
1864 campaign banner!

467. A remarkable piece of political history and discourse - a menacing 1864 campaign banner, 44 x 36" on white linen, bearing the slogan: "DISLOYAL MEN SHALL NOT GOVERN US! OCTOBER FROSTS WILL KILL THE COPPERHEADS." Indeed the prediction proved correct. The Copperheads (Northern Democrats who opposed total war against the South), were buoyed by the apparent stagnation of Union offensives at Atlanta and Petersburg during the summer preceding the 1864 election. They supported former General George B. McClellan against Lincoln in the campaign. The fall of Atlanta on September 2nd and the success of Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley raised Union spirits, hence this banner's prediction that state elections (the "October frosts") would kill anti-war Copperheadism! Light dampstain at right margin, tack holes along edges and a few other minor rust marks, otherwise quite clean with dark, bold print. Great condition, terrific size, a true museum piece that displays well. (Est. $4,000-5,000 )
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468. Engraved invitation to the "National Inauguration Ball March 4th 1865." 7 1/2 x 10", professionally matted and framed to 12 x 15". Engraved by Dempsey & O'Toole, lists managers within two eagles on columns representing the suppression of the Rebellion and restoration of the Union. Though not the rarest, certainly the most popular and handsome of inaugural ball invitations. Typically found uninscribed, this example, in excellent condition, bears the name of the invitee, Miss Belle Marsh. Very light, typical age/foxing, tiny tears that lay flat at top, not inspected out of frame, a beautiful presentation. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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469. Similar to the preceding lot, a fine National Inaugural Ball invitation. This example unengrossed; a bold, clean example. (Est. $1,000-1,200 )
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CAMPAIGN FERROS, TOKENS, MEDALS
470. The largest Lincoln campaign badge ever produced is the "George Clark ambro." It is on the want list of many collectors and has recently escalated sharply in price, with auction records just shy of $30,000 for perfect specimens. Technically, we do not feel these are ambrotypes, but describe them as "emulsion under glass" images. Whereas true ambrotypes tend to scratch or chip, these photographs have a tendency to bubble, flake or craze. Most specimens possess this characteristic. This large pinback badge measures 2 x 2 1/2" with the "Cooper Union" portrait of Lincoln within a copper mat and frame. The reverse has an orange store card imprinted "For President Hon. Abraham Lincoln." As shown, the "ambrotype" has areas of flaking or bubbling of the emulsion and one distinct area of loss between right cheek and ear. There are several streaks of light discoloration as well. Still the overall appearance is pleasing. We feel this specimen is still worthwile example for those accepting the fact this is a relic of a campaign almost 150 years ago. To those willing to accept some minor faults, this is a fine example of a classic "must have" campaign badge. (Est. $2,000-3,000 )
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The largest campaign "doughnut."
471. Lincoln-Hamlin back-to-back ferrotype "doughnut." Similar to DeWitt AL-1860-77. Fine copper shell with Lincoln portrait #1, 47mm. Both portraits clear and undamaged although somewhat dark with an opaque quality. This is the largest of the 1860 ferros, and it is worth noting that this rounded, three-dimensional frame was ONLY used in the 1860 campaign. Of the examples known, most show their age. A minty, brighter specimen would command close to $10,000... this should well be worth... (Est. $4,000-6,000 )
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472. Lincoln-Hamlin back-to-back ferrotype "doughnut." A 30mm. specimen of DeWitt AL-1860-87-A. Fine silvered shell with Lincoln portrait #3, (the "big head"), both portraits are bright and clear. The Lincoln side has slight exposure at extreme right edge from placement of the tintype at the time it was assembled; slight streak of discoloration from fixer washing across Hamlin detracts little. Overall, a superior example that displays well. (Est. $1,200-1,600 )
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473. Lincoln-Hamlin back-to-back ferrotype. #AL-1860-108. A neat political with a velvet covered frame of a most unusual olive/bronze color. The Lincoln ferro is clean and bright with no flaws. The Hamlin is pretty much shot. It comes with the original loop, velvet exhibits no wear whatsoever. Perfect specimens bring over $1,000. This displays excellently. (Est. $400-500 )
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474. Lincoln-Hamlin back-to-back ferrotype badge. Sullivan/DeWitt AL-1860-92. The Lincoln portrait has a small black spot alongside his head. The Hamlin portrait has a scratch above the right eyebrow and a small black spot in the field. Both portraits are clean and bright and the frame retains much of its original lustre. A fine example. (Est. $600-800 )
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475. Lincoln-Hamlin back-to-back, a 25mm. brass shell. Sullivan/DeWitt catalogs it as #1860-101, this example is just a tad dark on the Lincoln side; minor even crazing over Hamlin portrait. Tarnish to brass frame could be cleaned if you are so inclined, overall an above-average specimen. (Est. $400-500 )
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476. Almost identical to previous lot, another Lincoln-Hamlin ferro, 25mm. brass shell. This specimen is, once again, a little dark on the Lincoln side; one tiny clip along bottom edge to emulsion of Hamlin not into portrait. Another above-average keepsake from that pivotal campaign. (Est. $400-500 )
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477. Lincoln/Hamilin 17mm. back-to-back, #1860-118, with "Lincoln & Hamlin" on beveled brass frame. Tiny chip at top of Hamlin; inconsequential vertigre at bottom of brass. Bright, clean... a gem of a gem! (Est. $250-350 )
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478. John Bell ferro badge, JBELL 1860-48 (45 x 28 mm). Oval 1860 ferrotypes are rare and find great demand in the marketplace. This example has even surface crazing, with no loss of emulsion and still presents a strong image. Quite nice. (Est. $2,750-$3,500 )
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479. Breckinridge-Lane back-to-back ferrotype badge. Sullivan-Dewitt #JCB-1860-21. A superb example in near flawless condition. The frame has all the original gilt and the ferros are bright, well-focused, smooth and glossy. (Est. $600-800 )
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480. Breckinridge-Lane back-to-back ferrotype badge, JCB-1860-33. The Breckinridge ferro is a little dark with some light loss in the field along the top right. Portrait is otherwise sharp and bold. The Lane ferro has some minor craze lines to the emulsion and some minor loss along the bottom, but is otherwise clear and bright. Despite the flaws, a decent example of a ferro that is prohibitively rare. (Est. $250-300)
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481. Douglas-Johnson back-to-back, SD-1860-52. Excellent condition on this cute campaign badge. Douglas is slightly dark but clear; Johnson's portrait has been mounted high in the frame as made. Overall appearance is quite nice. (Est. $200-300 )
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482. Note: Catalog photos do not do this justice. Bell-Everett back-to-back ferrotype, JBELL-1860-42. This example is basically in MINT condition, but the Bell image was cut off-center and "clipped" at 8 and 10 o'clock. Despite these manufacturing flaws, overall image is very pleasing and PRISTINE. The images are in sharp focus-the Bell with a mirror finish. (Est. $200-300 )
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483. Abraham Lincoln (AL 1864-94; 25 mm) in a ferrotype frame designed by Gault. The brass frame is in great condition; photo surfaces are in nice shape but as often found are slightly dark when viewed from certain angles. Still a great political item from the more difficult campaign of 1864.
(Est. $1,300-$1,500)
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484. Rare, 1864 Lincoln ferrotype. 17mm., similar to AL-1864-121. This small ferro has a retouched portrait (adding a beard to a beardless image), some stars, and the inscription Abraham Lincoln 1864. Overall condition is quite nice. There is some wear to the outer edge, displays quite nicely! A scarce and popular design which seldom appears in such fine condition! (Est. $500-700 )
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485. Lincoln 1864 campaign badge worn at his New York funeral. 20 x 26 mm. gem albumen of Lincoln mounted on a
1 1/2 x 1 3/4" red, white and blue star-spangled silk ribbon. Attached beneath the portrait are military insignia, "D" and "22." This campaign badge was worn by John H. Kenny of "D" Company, 22nd Regiment, National Guard, State of New York. Sold together with a 6 1/4 x 8" four-page black-border leaflet, announcing "General Orders No. 9", issued April 20, 1865, ordering a parade to "...assist in rendering appropriate honors to the remains of that illustrious Patriot, whose loss, in the hour of victory, the Nation now deplores." The badge is in near mint condition. The general orders have some minor folds and edge tears. We have seen a similarly-decorated example also worn by a member of this unit at Lincoln's New York funeral procession, so assume that every member wore one. We have sold the McClellan mate to this badge in two previous auctions and have seen the Lincoln with this portrait and a different one (O-#84). (Est. $1,200-1,500 )
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486. Large, brass-matted Lincoln albumen with affixed brown ribbon. 1" wide by 1 1/4" tall, two minor creases in background, unusual in this size. (Est. $250-300 )
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487. McClellan 1864 campaign ferrotype badge. Sullivan/DeWitt GMcC-1864-43. The portrait of McClellan is slightly dark, as made, with light overall soiling and a minor crease across the upper chest, visible only upon close examination. Lacking pin; otherwise totally original and a fine specimen overall. (Est. $500-600 )
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488. John Fremont 1864 ferrotype in carte matte. Fremont ferrotypes are difficult to source and this example is among the largest available. Some emulsion faults in right field that do note detract from the strong image. (Est. $350-450 )
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489. Large 1864 McClellan campaign badge. 26 x 32 mm. albumen portrait in gem frame, holed at top, and suspended by a brass ring from a red, white and blue grosgrain ribbon. The ribbon is looped through two brass hangers in the form of fasces with spear tips on either end. Original pin attachment. Light overall soiling to ribbon with small area of discoloration (possibly from old price sticker), as shown. Quite an unusual piece-not your standard portrait, either. (Est. $400-500 )
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490. McClellan gem sized badge with Little Mac sporting a uniform. Strong 1864 campaign image. (Est. $250-$350 )
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491. Nice George McClellan gem-sized badge with cardboard photo in brass frame. McClellan in civilian clothes identifies this as a true 1864 campaign badge. (Est. $250-$350 )
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492. Brass-matted Lincoln tintype issued by Abbott & Co. of New York. This example is about as bright and clean a specimen as can be found. Lacking backpaper, devoid of the crazing usually found. If you want a superior example, this is the one! (Est. $800-1,200 )
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493. McClellan tintype by Abbott. Sixteenth-plate tintype of McClellan,
1 3/8 x 1 5/8", within embossed copper mat. Pink paper label on verso reads "Maj. General Geo. B. McClellan. Abbott & Co., 143 Nassau St., N.Y." Excellent. (Est. $300-350 )
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494. Large, ninth-plate tintype, the visible portion of the oval 1 1/2 x 2", covered by brass mat and glass, all housed in a 3 1/4 x 4" thermoplastic case with ringlet at top to hang. This specimen appears to have fine contrast, two tiny chips to corners of case, overall pleasing. (Est. $1,500-2,500 )
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495. Sixth-plate cased tintype of "Little Mac" in uniform. Brass-matted under glass, 3 x 3 1/2" overall, in velvet-lined thermoplastic "Union" case, some loss to bottom bevel of case, typical light abrasions to tintype, otherwise quite bold and clean. A nice, large specimen. (Est. $500-800 )
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496. The rarest of all 1864 McClellan-Pendleton badges. Offered is the exceedingly scarce McClellan-Pendleton jugate from the 1864 campaign. 1" across at its widest point, unfortunately the Pendleton ferrotype is missing, and the McClellan ferrotype looks to be a replacement. The shell itself is in fine condition with a nice patina, and just a hint of the original RWB paint that made up a flag motif around the images. The pin is missing. The Lincoln mate has sold for $35,000; a pristine McClellan example would run $18,000. A great opportunity to acquire a rare campaign relic, albeit one with these condition issues. (OPEN )
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497. Fabulous 24mm. Davis and Beauregard Confederate patriotic. A wonderful rarity in a raised, hollow brass shell. Most likely issued in a "border" city, perhaps Baltimore, probably April-May of 1861. Just a hint of emulsion loss along the rim and minor spotting on Davis side; the Beauregard side has one vertical crazing line visible only when held at an angle. Of the few known examples, this is by far the best we've seen! (Est. $1,000-1,500 )
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498. Abraham Lincoln (AL 1860-74(B); 19 mm). Scarce copper store card from Robbins, Royce and Hard, who were wholesale dealers in dry goods. This piece is in uncirculated condition. A neat item blending patriotic, political, and commercial Civil War elements. (Est. $175-$250 )
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499. Abraham Lincoln (AL 1860-73(A); 19 mm). Scarce brass store card for Bramhall (the die cutter) in great condition. Another fine rarity.
(Est. $175-$250 )
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500. Stephen Douglas (SD 1860-10; 28 mm). Nice white metal example. Douglas medals are much less common than comparable Lincoln medals. (Est. $100-$150 )
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501. Edward Everett medal (JBell 1860-5(A); 33 mm). John Bell's running mate in 1860. Nice chocolate brown surfaces. (Est. $40-$50 )
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502. George McClellan (GMcC 1864-14; 32 mm). Nice white metal example of a classic 1864 campaign medal.
(Est. $60-$80 )
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503. McClellan stickpin (DeWitt GMcC-1864-28). Bright UNC. Nicely burnished copper color. Re-soldered pin, nice patina. (Est. $150-200 )
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504. Civil War Rallying Cry! 17 mm. x 21 mm. brass stickpin depicting a cannon and two flags. Banners above and beneath, painted blue, declare "Remember Baltimore". This rare Civil War patriotic badge was issued at the time of the Pratt Street Riots in which Union troops, en route to the defense of Washington, were attacked by Southern sympathizers while traversing Baltimore. Several troops were killed, becoming the first casualties of the War and cementing the Lincoln administration's determination to keep Maryland in the Union, using whatever means were necessary. Excellent condition with dark orange toning. (Est. $200-300 )
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505. John Bell brass shell badge. We believe this to be the actual plate example displayed by DeWitt/Sullivan as JBELL 1860-6 (31 mm). In the McSorley auction, Joe Levine emphasized the rarity of this very piece. A wonderful item in remarkable condition. (Est. $450-$650 )
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506. Daniel Hastings, Governor of Pennsylvania 1895-9, had enlisted in the Army in 1861 at the age of 12 but was rescued from service by his father. This is a scarce copper medal from one of his campaigns. Exceptional, unimprovable condition, and quite scarce. (Est. $40-$60 )
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507. Andrew Johnson (AJohn 1860-5; 20 mm). A scarce piece found only in white metal. Great condition. (Est. $50-$75 )
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508. A great, rare, 1864 hopeful! William T. Sherman brass medal (31 mm) in AU condition. Sherman was a hopeful candidate in 1864, but burned Atlanta instead. (Est. $50-$70 )
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509. J.W. Geary for Pennsylvania Governor white metal campaign token, 1869. Geary (1819-73) remains an intriguing figure - although only 53 at the time of his death, he was a hero of the Mexican War, served as the first mayor of San Francisco, Governor of the Kansas Territory and later two terms as Governor of Pennsylvania, and had a hellacious Civil War record that defies description. He commanded forces in numerous campaigns including Gettysburg, was captured and exchanged, and was wounded at least eight times including being struck in the chest by a cannonball while leading a division at Chancellorsville! (Yes... he survived!) These medals are quite scarce and this is a lovely example. (Est. $50-$65 )
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510. General James Beaver for Pennsylvania Governor. Bronzed copper and in outstanding condition. Lost a leg in the battle of Ream's Station but survived to 1914. 19th century medals for local candidates are scarce. (Est. $60-$80 )
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511. Massachusetts pre-Civil War political medal (SL 1859-2; 28 mm). Strong white metal example. (Est. $50-$75 )
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512. John Hartranft for Governor of Pennsylvania. Lovely bright copper campaign medal. He served as Governor in
1873-9 and was a candidate for the Republican nomination for President in 1876. (Est. $60-$80 )
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513. Edward Everett campaign medal (JBELL 1860-5; 33 mm). Best known for giving long-winded speeches in the style of the time. Nice AU condition. (Est. $40-$60 )
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514. Union League silver medal (U 1862-3(a); 34 mm.) used by Philadelphia's Union League, a patriotic group during the War. AU example with nice original toning. (Est. $90-$120 )
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515. Official U.S. Army issue Service Medal given to veterans of the Civil War. Round bronze medal 1" diameter, "WITH MALICE TOWARDS NONE / WITH CHARITY FOR ALL." Reverse with wreath and "THE CIVIL WAR 1861-1865." Tarnishing, light wear but exc. Original numbered issue (stamped on edge). The bicolor blue/gray ribbon very worn and tattered but easily replaced. Original pin bar at top. (Est. $200-250 )
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RIBBONS


516. Important 1860 Abraham Lincoln silk campaign ribbon. A set of eight related ribbon designs (four single-picture and four jugate varieties) were produced for the 1860 election, based on photographic images of the candidates taken by Civil War photographer Mathew Brady. This Lincoln portrait, engraved by J.C. Buttre, is based on the famous "Cooper Union" pose, is considered to be the most influential political image of the time. Examples of this silk have sold for as much as $6-7,000. This is a fine example, 2.5 x 6.5" with no noteworthy defects, and rarely-seen nearly complete selvage (fine fringe) across top and bottom. A little very light, even soiling is noted for strictest accuracy, but this is a fine specimen.
(Est. $4,000-6,000 )
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517. A lovely "Wide Awake" ribbon with design by Childs after the photo by Samuel Fassett. Printed on light pink/rose fabric, one light stitch line through top of head with only a hint of age in background, similar to Sullivan-Fischer #24-a, most likely from Michigan or Connecticut - both states had "Litchfield" clubs! A great 1860 campaign ribbon! (Est. $2,000-2,500 )
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518. One of the prettiest, paper ribbons (Sullivan/Fischer #AL-17) from 1860. This specimen is untrimmed with plate marks at extreme edges, after the portrait by Fassett, facsimile signature below. If on silk, in this condition (minty!), would command $3,500! On paper... (Est. $800-1,200 )
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519. Nice John Fremont ribbon with outstanding slogan "Free Speech, Free Press, Free Men, Fremont." A wonderful 1856 campaign silk from the first Republican candidate. (Est. $200-$300 )
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520. Gorgeous 2 x 10" multicolored Stevensgraph mourning ribbon. The Late Lamented President Lincoln. Exported by Thomas Stevens at the time, 1865. "Assassinated at Washington 14 April 1865." Condition is excellent about as bright and clean as they come! (Est. $200-300 )
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521. 2 1/2 x 12" multicolored woven ribbon with Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural Address quotes. Light folds are barely noticeable, very fine condition. Sold at the 1893 and 1904 World's Fairs. We sold an example three years ago for $800... this example includes the original tassel! (Est. $400-600 )
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[The following twelve lots were discovered in a scrapbook kept by a printing concern in the Northeast. This remarkable album included samples of their work from the Civil War through early Reconstruction era. Each of these patriotic ribbons, some with intricate designs we have never encountered, retain their vibrant colors. Save for light, typical foxing - mostly from verso where they had been preserved in the book - each is in remarkable condition. Now... we need to make a statement about our estimates on these items. We have seen individual patriotic silks, similar to these, sell for upwards of $1,000-1,500 in isolated instances. And we have seen others, mostly in auctions of political memorabilia, completely "fall through the cracks." (The traditional community of collectors of campaign ribbons have little interest in patriotic designs.) So... we have opted to put very conservative estimates on these - just as a base. These are certainly rare items and deserve to be displayed alongside ribbons proclaiming support for 1860 and 1864 candidates... which would sell for ten times the amounts cited.]
522. Measuring 3 x 6", this silk says it all... "For the Union We Pledge Our All." Lovely brocade element at edges of fabric, another fabulous rarity. (Est. $300-500 )
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523. Gorgeous 6.5" long multicolored silk, copyright 1861 by J.E. Hayes of Massachusetts. This beautiful fabric celebrates Independence Day barely three months after the start of war with the admonition: "No traitor's flag shall tarnish thy golden dome with its rebellious shadows." Exquisite! (Est. $300-500 )
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524. Gold, red, white and blue, 6" long, a striking design. Once again, what can we say... beyond "elegant!" (Est. $300-500 )
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525. She weeps for Ellsworth! Similar to lot #523, another gorgeous 6.5" long multicolored silk celebrating Independence Day in 1861. This rare ribbon presents Columbia weeping before the tombstone of the martyr Col. Elmer Ellsworth with the legend "Defender of the Stars and Stripes! A nation mourns thy loss. A Nation's Tears thy memory shall bedew." Quite special. (Est. $300-500 )
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526. Please... please... look at this in the color section of the catalog or on our internet site. You MUST see this in color! All we can say is: 7" of masterful beauty. (Est. $300-500 )
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527. Let's keep this simple: one of the best patriotic ribbons ever. Case closed. Don't try to argue the point... it will fall on deaf ears. We love this 5.5" silk with brocade weave design at edges. Hey... don't think of questioning our opinion on this one! We'll argue the matter all the way to the Hague if necessary! (Est. $300-500 )
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528. Escalloped edges adorn this 7" long silk. The blue and red colors resonate... this ribbon is so bright it appears new. A great textile more than 140 years old! (Est. $300-500 )
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529. 6" long, another wonderful flag design. (Est. $300-500 )
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530. We've seen an example on paper - never on silk. A bold, 8" ribbon in red and blue with a simple, elegant design.
(Est. $300-500 )
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531. A pair of 4.5" beauties! Great, simple, patriotic lapel pieces. (Est. $200-400 )
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532. Another 6" long silk with the American Standard. Patriotism as a force to wage war was never more important than in the early 1860s. These devices united the loyal who lived among those with questionable sympathies. Remember... particularly in large cities such as New York... there were those with "Copperhead" leanings who questioned the war - but could NEVER question the flag!! (Est. $300-500 )
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533. Another pair of gems. 4" and 4.5" long. (Est. $200-400 )
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534. (CONFEDERATE SECESSION BADGE) An exceedingly rare and most desirable relic, a Confederate "secession badge" worn by Southern sympathizers to demonstrate their patriotism and support for their new nation. This badge is in the form of a hand-stitched silk First National Confederate flag, measuring about 4" long, 1 3/4" wide, with eleven stitched crosses representing stars and gold braided cord at top ending in two gold tassels. This flag was meant to hang upon the wearer's chest, secured from the white bone or quill attached at top. very few of these badges survived the war, happily this example did and shows only slight soiling and wear. A supreme rarity of Southern design! (Est. $1,000-1,500 )
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BALLOTS
535. 4 1/2 x 7 1/2" jugate ballot for Buchanan and Breckinridge in Virginia. One of the more desirable ballots of the period. Tiny spindle hole and signature of voter on the verso, indicating it was actually cast in the election. Excellent. (Est. $300-350 )
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536. Matched pair of Indiana ballots, each 3" wide, the taller Lincoln ticket is 5.5" tall. Light, even age; someone at the time has noted returns from Brownsville - the Lincoln ticket received 94 votes while Douglas and Johnson received 157. (Est. $150-250 )
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537. A remarkable pair of matched electoral tickets from 1864. 4 1/2 x 2 3/4", minor mounting remnants on verso from album removal, light staining and age, apparently unsigned. We believe these to have been issued in New York. Why? Well... the Museum of the City of New York owns a similar pair (MS Coll., Cab. 3, Box 182), those inscribed on the verso by the original owner: Chauncey M. Depew! (U.S. Senator, presidential hopeful, rail road president, etc.) At the time of the `64 election, Depew was New York's Secretary of State! These are quite scarce -- desirable in their simple, elegant "matter of fact" design! A great pair to display together. (Est. $600-800 )
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538. One of the best, graphic ballots issued: the classic 1864 Lincoln - Johnson from San Francisco. Printed in light brown on the front; black/blue image of Kearsarge sinking the Alabama on verso. Clean. (Est. $300-500 )
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539. A pretty, illustrated Ohio "Union Presidential Ticket" from Miami County, 1864. Below the names of the candidates, Lincoln and Johnson, are the names of the electors. Light, usual age/folds, overall a clean example. (Est. $150-200 )
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540. Group of three (3) Virginia ballots in support of the OTHER Civil War president. One on white paper, one on tan, one on bright blue. Each has spindle-hole cancellation with original voter's signature on verso, light age, overall quite bright and fine. Great historical ephemera! (Est. $600-800 )
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541. Another Indiana ballot, this an "Unconditional Union Ticket", 3 x 9.5" with a great woodcut "Don't Give up the Ship." Folds, age/foxing, with period notes regarding vote counts next to each candidate. A great 1863 mid-term election piece proclaiming support for the Union candidates! (Est. $70-90 )
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542. One of the largest, prettiest ballots of the campaign! 1864 "Union Republican Ticket" from Massachusetts, 6 x 13". This ballot pronounces support for the re-election of wartime Governor Andrew and includes a few interesting names: Edward Everett, who just a few months before had joined the President on the dais at the Gettysburg dedication, is listed as a Presidential Elector; so are the great poet John Greenleaf Whittier and a distant relative of the President, Levi Lincoln of Worcester - part of the Hingham line of Lincolns! Printed in red and blue by Wright & Potter, the woodcut of Columbia and Liberty (by Bricker & Russell) is slightly off-register giving a sort-of three-dimensional affect. Two small tears at top lie flat as do two minor separations at one light fold... all easily mended without any detraction to the strong, vivid presentation. This one is a winner! (Est. $300-500 )
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543. [Mississippi anti-Reconstruction Ballot] A rare printed ballot for the "Democratic State Ticket", measuring 3 x 6.25" on purple paper with the sub-heading: "AGAINST THE CONSTITUTION", doubtless the proposed constitution (which went into effect in 1869). The ballot lists Benjamin G. Humphreys for Governor and Kinloch Falconer for Lieutenant Governor as well as nominees for Secretary of State, Treasurer, Auditor and Attorney General, and C.H. Townsend for Congress as well state representatives for the county. Benjamin Humphreys had been elected governor in October 1865 as an unabashed Democrat under the moderate Reconstruction program under Andrew Johnson. Shortly after his re-election, Irwin McDowell, enforcing the new radical congressional Reconstruction program, physically ejected Humphreys from office. A neat piece of history!
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CLICK HERE FOR PART II (Lots 544-673)
   

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