ON STAGE, WORKS OF ART

928. FORD, John T. Theatre manager, owner of Holiday Street Theatre in Baltimore and Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC, site of Lincoln's assassination. Copy in wraps of the play Victims (how appropriate!) by Tom Taylor, published in London by Thomas Lacy. Signed three times by Ford - on the front cover ("John T. Ford Holiday Street Theatre," identically on the top of the title page and the first page, but with the addition of the date, 1854). Tom Taylor was also the author of Our American Cousin, performed at Ford's Theatre the night of the assassination. Lacks back cover. Front cover is loose and is missing one corner, typical soiling. Signatures are fine.
(Est. $600-800)
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Signed just a few months before his brother blackened the family name.
929. Edwin Booth autograph dated January 16, 1865. Archivally framed, 11 x 15" overall, with an original albumen photograph, most likely a cabinet card. A lovely presentation from this country's greatest Shakesperean actor!
(Est. $200-300)
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Booth and Jefferson, the titans of the Nineteenth Century Stage!
930. A fine group of three (3) pieces, including BOOTH, Edwin, A.L.S. 5 x 6", [n.p., n.d.] to an unnamed correspondent: "I trust that the opportunity will soon be mine to visit the 'Tavern' in a quiet way and as a very silent member. With cordial thanks for the great courtesy shown me I am truly yours Edwin Booth". Irregular margins and light creases, otherwise fine. Together with his signature dated October 15, 1876 on a 4.5 x 2.25" slip of paper. Marginal tear and light foxing. Together with JEFFERSON, Joseph, A.Q.S., 5.5 x 4.5", a quote from his most noted role, Rip Van Winkle: "If two men ride of a horse one must ride behind J. Jefferson". Light toning at top right, otherwise near fine. Together, three items. (Est. $150-200)
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Edwin Booth's close friend - and rival for leading roles!
931. JEFFERSON, Joseph. ALS, 2pp., August 20, 1892, with autographed quote on integral sheet, together on personal stationery embossed with Buzzard's Bay, MA. "My Dear Miss Farnell, I have much pleasure in sending you the autograph you desire.You did not mention that you wanted a quotation but I fancy that you will not object to one especially if I make it appropriate..." The quote on the following page reads "The person who now presumes to occupy you is Dr. Pauplap (?) L.L.D. and A.S.S." Separated at fold, a great example. (Est. $75-100)
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One of John Wilkes Booth's loves.

932. MITCHELL, Margaret Julia "Maggie." (1832-1918) An actress who first took the stage as a child in New York, she was considered a "star" as early as 1851. Openly sympathetic to the Confederate cause, she became quite close to Booth and, in fact, sponsored his first benefit performance. The two worked together on stage with various companies from 1858-61. Mitchell, who liked to dance on the American flag as a defiant stand in support of the South, was one of the future assassin's closest friends... and believed, by many, one of his lovers. In June, 1862, she introduced her best known part of "Fanchon" at the Olympic theatre in New York City. She traveled extensively throughout the country as a star and became quite wealthy in later life. Her signature on a 4.25 x 2.5" card: "Yours truly Maggie Mitchell April 27th. 1864" Extremely faint toning, otherwise a fine example just one year before her "friend" took Lincoln's life. (Est. $70-90)
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933. Very early and desirable carte of Edwin Booth, Brady imprint on verso. Extremely bold, an early photograph of the greatest actor of the 19th century. (Est. $200-250)
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934. Edwin Booth by T.R. Burnham, front and back imprints. A superb carte. (Est. $200-250)
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935. A stunning portrait of the young thespian, on mount by original photographer, Fredricks. Bold, clean, a couple of inconsequential bumps/scrapes at left edge, a quite desirable carte photograph. (Est. $150-200)
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936. Ooops! They got this one wrong! Edwin Booth on titled board misidentifying him as his brother! Imprint by McIntosh and Vose of Vermont on verso. A great photograph... even if the wrong actor got top "billing!" (Est. $100-200)
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937. The great actor in one of his most memorable roles! Wonderful, 9 x 20" playbill from the Boston Theatre, under management of the "Lessee," J.B. Booth (Edwin's brother) presenting Maggie Mitchell in Fanchon and Edwin as Richard III. Repaired at center fold from verso, quite fine, we believe this dates from 1858. By the way... President and Mrs. Lincoln attended Ford's Theatre on October 30, 1863 to attend a performance of Fanchon, The Cricket startting Maggie Mitchell... the same role she is listed for in this playbill. A great display piece! (Est. $50-80)
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938. A fabulous, rare oversized program from New York's Academy of Music for the "Joint Appearance of Tommaso Salvini and Edwin Booth in Shakespeare's Tragedies of Othello and Hamlet." An 1886 performance, the 8-page program includes numerous advertisments, a testimonial letter to Booth congratulating him on his unprecedented run in Hamlet, and a brief bio on his co-star. (Tommaso Salvini (1830-1915) won international recognition for his portrayals of great tragic heroes. Among his chief successes on Italian, English, and American stages, he was best known for playing Shakespeare's Othello.) Light separation at horizontal fold, small tape repair on last page, quite fine. (Est. $80-120)
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939. Civil War Era Playbill Group. A nice collection of five (5) large playbills measuring approximately 9 x 24" each for performances in New York and Philadelphia including an elaborate bill for Faust, with a scarce pictorial engraving at center as well as an 1862 appearance of Edwin Forrest at Niblo's Garden in New York. Marginal tears and chips with only minor loss, weak at some folds, but printing still bright and distinct. (Est. $150-200)
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940. Large Civil War Era Playbills Group. A fine lot of twelve (12) playbills measuring between 5 x 8" and 6 x 22" for performances in Boston including appearances by Edwin Forrest in Richard III and the Broker of Bogota, and Charlotte Cushman in MacBeth. Also of interest is a bill for a minstrel show which included such favorites as "Gipsey Davy" and "DARKY AT THE PLAY". One has to wonder how the latter number was received by "Colored Persons [who were] admitted only to the Gallery to seats assigned them." Usual creases and wrinkles, a few marginal tears, otherwise very good. (Est. $200-400)
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941. Advertising broadside, 8.5 x 16", listing "Musical Entertainment of the Glee Club of the 13th Massachusetts Regiment" at the Lyceum Hall in Hagarstown, MD. The broadside promises "...Humorous and Sentimental Music, combined with the leading Camp Songs..." Affixed at top and bottom edges to paper underneath. Nine inch tear down center lays flat, some loss at edges, some damp stains and typical toning/browning. Entertainment of this sort was so vital... even in the darkest days of war. (Est. $400-500)
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WORKS OF ART
An exceptional bronze by Charles Keck...
perhaps the only full-sized casting extant.
942. Standing 32" tall (including the 2" base), this solid bronze is the only example we can source in this size - known examples are approximately half this size, issued by the Roman Bronze Works of New York. A native New Yorker, Charles Keck (1875-1951), studied at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League with Augustus Saint-Gaudens. He spent a number of years at the Academy in Rome, as well as working in Greece, Florence and Paris. Keck's sculptures can be seen throughout the United States. He designed three busts for the Hall of Fame of Great Americans: James Madison, Elias Howe and Patrick Henry. Perhaps his most famous work is the Liberty Statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil which was presented as a gift to the Brazilian government from the American Chamber of Commerce on the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the Republic of Brazil. Keck also designed coins and medals including the US Panama-Pacific Exposition gold dollar, 1915; the Vermont Sesquicentennial half dollar, 1927; the Lynchburg Sesquicentennial half dollar, 1936; among numerous others. The prolific artist also designed the Great Seal of the state of Virginia created in 1931; sculpted the statue of Father Duffy found in Times Square, NYC; the equestrian "Stonewall Jackson" in Charlottesville, VA; and even created the defining work of "Booker T. Washington" at Tuskegee, Alabama. But Abraham Lincoln was clearly a favorite subject for Keck. He did a massive study of a seated Lincoln found in Wabash; "Lincoln and Boy" in upper Manhattan; and a work in Hingham that the great Lincoln scholar Dr. Louis A. Warren proclaimed as "the most beautiful of all the sculptured portraits of Lincoln." We believe the reduction statues by Roman Bronze Works, the pre-eminent art foundry in the U.S. (they cast all of the works by Remington) were based on this original study. This monumental work of art, perhaps, as we believe, the prototype, is incised on the base "C. Keck Sc." and has a rich, warm patina. A unique opportunity to obtain an important piece by a significant American artist. (Est. $8,000-10,000)
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943. Stunning Large Lincoln Bronze Sculpture. This beautiful and substantial work of art stands 22" high on a base measuring 15" x 11 1/2", but its great mass makes it seem even larger! It depicts Abraham Lincoln as an adolescent, seated on a tree stump. He grasps an axe in one hand and a copy of "Life of Washington -- Weems" in the other. This symbolizes two of the enduring legends surrounding this American icon...the self-taught youth and splitter of rails. It is titled on the base, "The Youth of Lincoln." The artist signed one side of the base "Ames Van Wart, Scr." Van Wart's work, "The War of 1870," is represented in the Collection of the 7th Regiment Armory in New York City. The other side of the base is inscribed, "'Inspired of God' - Henry Watterson. F. Barbedienne, Foundeur." Henry Watterson was the editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal. A former Confederate soldier and Democrat, he advocated reconciliation between the North and South and condemned the Ku Klux Klan. F. Barbedienne was a famous French bronze foundry whose name was and is synonymous with quality. The inclusion of Watterson's quote is particularly poignant, especially in that it did not represent the popular view of Lincoln held in the South. Superb quality and certainly one of the finest Lincoln bronzes extant. Circa 1890-1910. (This is the exact same work recently offered in a Texas auction - a failed transaction - and the same piece detailed in the last issue of The Rail Splitter.)
(Est. $4,000-6,000)
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A heroic bust in bronze. An amazing work of art sculpted from life.
944. A striking bronze bust of General Robert E. Lee by the artist, Frederick Volck. Volck (1833-91), a native of Nuremburg, Germany emigrated to Richmond, VA and at the onset of the Civil War was employed in the Confederate Naval Ordnance Department. In 1863, Volck executed a statue of Lee and a statue of Lee and his horse Traveler. In fact, the artist took actual measurements of Traveler and observed Lee and his horse together in preparation for the statuette sculpted that year. The artist is also recognized for his busts of Jefferson Davis and "Stonewall" Jackson. This quite handsome bust is from the original terra cotta done by Volck. This sizable bronze is 19" tall and rests on an octagonal base atop black marble. The front is titled "Robert E. Lee" while the base bears the inscription "Frederick Volck, 1863, Richmond, VA." Pristine condition, heavy (almost 50 pounds!), quite impressive. ($2,800-3,800)
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945. Thomas Moretto ceramic statue. Colored in stains. (Italy: Lo Scricciolo, mid-20th century.) Limited to 250 copies (so marked); 14" high; 10" at the base. A delicate, even whimsical rendition of Lincoln, flanked by the U.S. flag and a bullet-torn Confederate battle flag with a drum and sticks at his feet. Thin legs, and spidery fingers holding a piece of paper (Gettysburg Address or Emancipation Proclamation?). An oversize bow tie and hat accentuate this colorful piece. This statuette is in excellent condition, unmarked with colors bright.
(Est. $1,200-1,800)
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946. A huge Alva Studio reproduction of the 1860 bust by Leonard Volk. Issued circa 1950, the work, 16" tall, on a solid 5" base, 21" overall. Some repair work found at one nostril and chip on chin, still a nice presentation. (OPEN)
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947. Courter, Franklin C. [1854-1947]
ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Oil on board, signed "S. C. Courter"; early 20th century. 21.5 x 27.5 inches (sight), 26.5 x 32.5 inches (overall). This painting was inspired by the February 9, 1864 Anthony Berger photograph of Lincoln, taken at Mathew Brady's Washington gallery. The oil is bright and fresh looking. Courter was a professor of drawing and painting and department head at Albion College, Battle Creek, Michigan. His best known painting was "Lincoln Showing Sojourner Truth the Bible Presented Him by the Colored People at Baltimore." When this painting was completed it was exhibited in the Michigan Building at the 1893 Chicago World's Columbian Exposition, and then brought back to Battle Creek and hung in the old Battle Creek Sanitarium; but the Sanitarium burned to the ground in 1902 and the painting was lost. Between 1870 and his death at age 90, his primary interest was the study of Lincoln. According to Courter himself, "(My) first portrait of Lincoln was painted for a class memento for a class graduating in Albion College over 40 years ago. Then the picture of Sojourner Truth ... Since that picture...every angle of the subject has been of interest. All biographies, photographs and engravings, the life mask and full descriptions of his complexion and other data are made a deep study for the sole purpose of realizing as nearly perfect as possible every characteristic. Over 40 years of almost constant study of Lincoln for pictorial purposes brings one to be acquainted with his subject. One may safely say this is a life portrait." As stated by Courter in later life, he produced over 25 individual oil portraits of Lincoln; many were sold by the Ainslie Galleries, late of New York City and Los Angeles. His oils have graced the collections of Andrew W. Mellon, the National Portrait Gallery, several public and college libraries and John J. Lincoln (a presidential blood relative, who owned three). Over the last fifteen years, six of Courter's oils have been sold privately, ranging from $20,000 to $45,000. Courter's oil paintings have a true feeling of having been painted "from life;" they are far and away the finest portrayals of Lincoln by those artists who came after Lincoln's death. This is a unique opportunity to own a major work of art: a very handsome, nicely colored rendering of the so-called "penny profile." (Est. $12,000-18,000)
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A signed work by the great Dali!

948. Signed Salvador Dali print, a limited edition pencil signed as #84 in a limited edition of 150 issued. 19 1/2 x 25 1/2" color lithograph or silkscreen by Salvador Dali entitled "Homage to Lincoln." This is one of only three historical figures Dali paid homage to with his work... a glorious piece in vibrant colors. At first glance, as in many of Dali's works, a dominant and easily perceived image catches the viewer's eye. One easily sees two angels thrusting upward to Heaven with their blue shrouds trailing behind. Once one begins to view the other elements of the work, there appears in the shrouds of the angels the restful face of Lincoln (complete with beard, heavy brow and worried forehead) being carried by their wings up to Heaven. The blast of the gun is seen on the left while St. Peter and the other angels herald his arrival on the right. In the lower left trails of blue shrouds are figures that mourn and lament his untimely death. Dali gives Lincoln great reverence and emotion through his unique artistic expression and style. In 1973, the plates were destroyed. A pretty example. (Est. $2,500-3,500)
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An Artist's Proof by "America's artist," Norman Rockwell.
949. Norman Rockwell's large, 19 x 34" limited edition lithograph of "Young Lincoln." Special oversized portfolio edition, an artist's proof noted "A/P", printed on papier d'Arches, signed by Rockwell in pencil. Published in 1976 by Eleanor Ettinger Inc. New York and housed in a custom leather portfolio. "Each example is a fifteen color lithograph..." Rockwell is known to have extensively researched this portrait by traveling to all the Lincoln sites. With his wife driving, Rockwell insisted on visiting every point on the Lincoln trail - in the hope of capturing the true character for his study. He succeeded in this marvelous work which he considered one of his favorites. Seldom offered, examples have been offered by prominent dealers for $15,000. The example we sold six years ago brought $7,000 with the premium. Inconsequential marks on blank board facing print, quite bright. (Est. $5,000-10,000)
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950. An elegant, lovely portrait miniature under glass. We believe this to be executed on a wafer thin piece of ivory, housed under custom-fit convex glass recessed into a handsome, period frame. Portrait measures 2 1/2 x 3 1/2" (site), 4 3/5 x 6" overall, minor wear along extreme perimeter. Signed by the artist, "Graft", after the Berger portrait, warm, natural colors make this a particularly desirable work... one of the nicest we've seen. (Est. $1,000-2,000)
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951. Lincoln chromolithograph by E.C. Middleton 1864 in original, gold-painted gessoed frame. Colors are strong, perhaps the cleanest specimen we have encountered. While Middleton issued these well into the latter part of the decade, this example includes the "Warranted Oil Colors" copyright date of 1864. This is the one example to own - bright and clean! (Est. $400-600)
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One of the largest Magnus Prints issued... detailing the Battle of Gettysburg.

952. A richly colored print depicting the third day of Gettysburg (July 3, 1863). A rare study, 20.5 x 15" (sight) matted and framed to 22 x 28" overall. Two small tears at extreme bottom margin, otherwise fairly clean and very bright. A wonderful graphic that seldom comes to market. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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953. Another Magnus!
18 x 22" hand-colored lithograph of "Satterlee U.S.A. General Hospital, West Philadelphia." Published by James D. Gay and lithographed by Charles Magnus. Includes statistics and personnel of the hospital listed at bottom, circa 1864. Satterlee was the war's largest hospital with 4,500 beds and most of the Gettysburg casualties were brought here. However, due to the large casualties of The Wilderness and Spottsylvania battles, tents were put up around the hospital to handle the overflow. Typical foxing, bottom left corner professionally repaired, very small edge tears detract little. (Est. $200-300)
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A gruesome event... depicted in a work of art.
954. Detailed lithograph depicting the "Military Execution of James Griffin, alias John Thomas Barnett, a Private of the 11th PA. Cavalry, for Desertion and Highway Robbery, at Portsmouth, Va., Sept. 17, 1863." This wonderful lithograph of a military firing squad lists all the units invited to witness the shooting. Printed by Endicott & Co. of New York, 18 x 13", minor foxing, minor tearing at the edges, else quite fine. The first example we've seen... an evocative depiction of Civil War military justice! (Est. $400-600)
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955. Grant Currier & Ives print, 1868. Small folio, 11 x 14", (Conningham 2274). "General Grant At The Tomb of Abraham Lincoln Oakridge Cemetery Springfield Illinois." The Union hero respectfully stands on the pathway leading up to Lincoln's tomb. This rare black and white print was published in 1868, when Grant was running for President and can therefore be considered a campaign item. It sought to link the two figures most closely credited with saving the Union. A few very minor edge tears repaired with archival tape. Light overall toning. One small piece missing from top right corner. A fine example and the first we've seen. (Est. $150-200)
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956. Incredible, end-of-war cartoon. 12 x 9" hand-colored litho The First Day of May 1865 or Genl. Moving Day in Richmond VA. The scene shows a Sheriff's Sale of the government house (a posted sign reads "To Let. Apply Lincoln & Co.") Robert E. Lee carries a musket, swords and a sceptre while a government employee carries boxes of state papers. A former slave thumbs his nose while a dog relieves himself on a chest containing worthless CSA treasury notes. Likely issued after the Fall of Richmond and prior to Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Strong colors with light toning, one area lightened at top left and minor wrinkle at bottom, overall quite fine. A rare, graphic item. (Est. $300-400)
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957. Grant and Sherman. A nicely detailed and sharp engraving of a seated Grant and Sherman entitled "THE COUNCIL OF WAR." Engraved and published by William Sartain, Philadelphia, 1865. Measures 13.5 x 9.75" (sight) and 21" x 17.5" overall. Tastefully matted and framed. A few very minor soiled areas, else very clean and bright. (Est. $300-500)
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958. A wonderful pair of lithographs, each providing a montage of commanders, one for the Union and one for the Confederacy. By Notman Photo Co. of Boston, MA., 1884, matted and framed. The Union litho, 7 3/4 x 10 1/4" (sight) and 14 x 17" overall, features Lincoln surrounded by such generals as Sherman, Meade, Grant and Hooker. The Confederate litho, 8 x 10" (sight), and 12 3/4 x 16 1/2" overall, shows Jeff Davis with famous Confederate generals including A.P. Hill, Jackson, Lee and Longstreet. A nice pair. (Est. $300-500)
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959. Currier and Ives, hand-tinted print of U.S. Grant at Vicksburg atop his horse housed in a period ogee frame. Caption at bottom reads "At the Siege of Vicksburg, July 4th 1863." Measures 9.5" x 13.5" (sight) and 12.5" x 16.5" overall. Section of veneer at bottom chipped away, very light soiling to print, otherwise very good. (Est. $150-300)
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960. McClellan and Staff by Currier and Ives. A hand colored print of George B. McClellan on his horse with his staff. Housed in a vintage ogee frame, captioned at bottom: "At the Battle of Williamsburg Va. May 5th 1862." Measures 9.5" x 13.5" (sight) and 13" x 17" overall. Usual chips to period frame, light soiling and toning to print, else very good. (Est. $200-250)
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961. Robert E. Lee. Hand-colored front cover of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper of March 24, 1866 bearing a seated portrait of Lee. Measures 9" x 12.5" (sight) 17.5" x 21" overall. Ornately matted and framed in rich wood tones. Light creases, else fine. (Est. $100-200)
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962. Vintage, photographic tribute. A handsome example of the famous Lincoln print using the President's visage affixed atop John Calhoun's body. Unique and special in that the print itself is a large photograph - a full sheet, mounted to original artist's titled board, framed with gilt edge, 20 x 24" overall. Legend at bottom reads: "Abraham Lincoln. Inaugurated as President March 4, 1861, Inaugurated for his 2d term, March 4, 1865, Assassinated April 14, 1865." With photographer's details, S. W. Sawyer, Bangor, ME, a scarce Victorian mourning display. (Est. $200-400)
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Francis Carpenter,
while painting above an "ice cream saloon,"
lists his peers
in the art community.


963. CARPENTER, Francis Bicknell. (1830-1900) Portrait painter, most famous for his painting of Lincoln reading the Emancipation Proclamation to his Cabinet which hangs in the Capitol. He was also the author of Six Months at the White House (1866). Scarce ALS, 3pp., November 8, 1853, New York, from Carpenter to a friend. Carpenter opens the letter by telling the reader he has just moved into a new studio on Broadway in New York "directly over Thompsons Ice Cream Saloon - one of the two great resorts here..." Carpenter then dedicates the balance of the letter (at the recipient's request) to listing "the most promising, as well as most eminent painters in the country." He lists ten portrait painters, ten landscape artists, six historical painters (included is Emanuel Leutze, another artist famous for painting Lincoln's portrait), six composition painters, five artists in other cities, and five artists he considers "Very Promising." Quite rare, very fine. (Est. $300-500)
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A ticket to view the Civil War masterpiece by the "Father of Realism in America."
964. Ticket to an exhibition that featured James Hope's 1865 masterpiece, The Army of the Potomac. Hope (1818-92), a celebrated landscape artist, born in Scotland, had works displayed throughout the Northeast in the years leading up to the Civil War. He was among the group of artists who saw active duty. At 43, he organized and recruited a company of soldiers and was made Captain of Co. B, 2nd Regiment of the Vermont Infantry. Hope had taken part in a dozen engagements prior to Antietam, but disabled by illness, was assigned to sideline duties as a scout and mapmaker. He recorded in his sketchbook the battle scenes before his eyes, and then after the battles, converted his sketches into a series of five large paintings. (The Antietam scenes are now owned by the National Park Service and exhibited at the battlefield museum.) But, without question, Captain Hope's finest painting was the "Army of the Potomac," exhibiting 8000 men encamped on Pamunkey River, with Gen. McClellan and his staff in the foreground. It was painted from a sketch made on the spot during the Civil War and was valued (in about 1902) at $25,000. In the NY State building at the Pan-American Expo in Buffalo, NY, one entire floor was given to Hope's collection, and of it the Boston Times said that in historical interest, it was second to none on the globe. (This celebrated work of art now resides in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.) The opportunity to view original works of art in the 19th century came at a price... apparently 25-cents! A wonderful piece of ephemera. (OPEN)
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A superb example -
a masterpiece of medallic art!
965. The classic Victor David Brenner bas-relief copper plaque, "Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865."
7 x 9 1/2", with 1907 copyright incused at side, this example enjoys a rich patina - quite lovely in appearance. Brenner (1871-1924), a native of Lithuania, is best known as the designer of the Lincoln penny. (Interestingly, his initials first appeared on the cent in 1909, at the bottom of the back side of the cent. It was removed in the second half of 1909 only to reappear on the shoulder in 1918. Don't ask us why... contact your local numismatist!) We sold a fine example mounted on a marble base three years ago for just under $3,000. This specimen should well be worth... (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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966. A fine bronze plaque by the artist Henry Merwin Shrady. Shrady was born in East View, NY. His father, George Shrady, was one of the physicians who attended Ulysses S. Grant during the struggle with throat cancer that led to his death. And, interestingly, as an artist, Shrady's greatest triumph is the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial in Washington, D.C. Measuring 4 3/4 x 5 1/2" with an incused legend on verso: "Cast by the Henry-Bonnard Bronze Co New York, 1890." Below is the artist's facsimile signature. Slight clip to the top edge as made, very small hole at top of hair-line, minor pitting where hairline meets the plaque, else very good. A scarce example. (Est. $250-300)
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967. An impressive work: a 13" tall marble bas-relief profile housed in a period, blue velvet lined shadow box. The marble bust is signed "C.N. Pike, Sculptor, 1891" on the neck; the frame, measures 15 x 18" overall. Pike was an assistant to U.S. Mint engraver James Barton Longacre. A pretty piece. (Est. $600-1,200)
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968. The Declaration of Independence. An excellent piece - a framed copper bas-relief depicting the signing of the Declaration of Independence surrounded by the text of the document. The bottom bears facsimiles of the signatures. Copyrighted by S. H. Black, 1859. Plate measures 7 x 8" and 10.5 x 11" overall. A fine, pre-Civil War patriotic... from a time when apprehension as to the future of the Union invited a fond look at the Founding Fathers. (Est. $400-600
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