ASSASSINATION & MOURNING MATERIAL

939. Isaac Goldstein "The Levite." Autograph Manuscript Signed in Hebrew, 1p. 4 3/4 x 5 1/2", [n.p. c. 1865], an acrostic poem in which each line begins with a different letter of Abraham Lincoln's name. As translated in the display housing this unique tribute:

"Happy are you Lincoln. Who is like unto thee! | You are exalted among Kings and Princes. | You have done much with your exalted spirit. | Who among the great are like Lincoln? | Who can be praised like you? | You have earned a name among the Great. | Your right hand has shown its prowess. | You have girded the sword of the slain. | You have drawn the bow nightly and daily. | Our father has created us. | And you have created freedom in the land and given them freedom. | They will praise and bless your name forever. | Who among princes is equal to you and who can be praised like you?" Signed at the bottom "Isaac Goldstein the Levite."
Simply framed with a translation. A truly special and unusual piece of Lincolniana. Little is known concerning the author, Isaac Goldstein. We believe he lived in Philadelphia... an Isaac Goldstein is shown to live in that city at the time and census records list him at the correct age. (This memorial was obtained about fifty years ago in a suburb of that city.) Goldstein follows a very long tradition of the use of acrostics in Hebrew literature. Acrostics also became fashionable among Victorians in sentimental poetry like the piece offered here. Overall fine condition. A most unusual and rare piece housed in a simple wood frame, matted together with a translation. (Est. $7,000-9,000)
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Prohibitively rare!
940. SURRATT, John H. (1844-1916) Lincoln assassination conspirator. Son of executed Lincoln conspirator Mary Surratt. During the Civil War, he was a Confederate messenger, collecting intelligence on Union troop and naval movements. Plotted a failed kidnapping attempt on Lincoln with John Wilkes Booth in March, 1865. Surratt fled the country on April 14, 1865 and was arrested by American officials in Egypt in 1866. His trial ended with a hung jury. Exceptionally rare T.L.S. "J H Surratt", 1p., 8 x 10 1/2" on
Baltimore Steam Packet Company letterhead, Baltimore, October 23, 1908 writing that "...the matter referred to by you was never printed in pamphlet form, and there are no copies extant..." Several years after his trial, he gave a lecture on the conspiracy. Though he boasted of his involvement in the kidnapping plot, he claimed that "Such a thing as the assassination of Mr. Lincoln I never heard spoken by any of the parties. Never!" He did however recall a quarrel among the conspirators over his suggestion that the kidnapping plot be abandoned citing heavy security surrounding Lincoln. He claimed that Booth stated: "Well, gentlemen, if the worst comes to the worst, I shall know what to do." Four rose in protest, one stating that "If I understand you to intimate anything more than the capture of Mr. Lincoln I for one will bid you goodbye." Booth apologized blaming his rash statement on too much drink. Surratt lived out the balance of his life quietly, working as an auditor for the Baltimore Steam Packet Company. Usual folds, one partially separated, otherwise very good. (Est. $2,500-4,500)
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Pass to the trial of the conspirators
in the Lincoln assassination.


941. HUNTER, David. On May 1, 1865 President Andrew Johnson signed a controversial Executive Order to form a nine man military commission to adjudicate John Wilkes Booth's conspirators in the assassination of President Lincoln and attempted overthrow of the Federal Government. The trial, lasting from May 10 through June 30, was presided over by General David Hunter. The proceedings concluded with the pronouncement of guilty verdicts for all the conspirators. This 2 x 3 3/8" pass, which is boldly signed by Hunter as President of the Commission, would allow a spectator to enter and observe the proceedings. A rare relic from a time that tested this country's mettle, which the judicial consequences are still under debate. Excellent.
(Est. $800-1,200)
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942. HUNTER, David. (1802-86) Close Lincoln friend who accompanied the President-elect for a portion of his inaugural journey from Springfield to Washington, and commanded the detail that escorted the return of his body to Illinois. Considered one of Lincoln's more controversial generals - a man absolutely despised in the South - Hunter first entered military service after graduating from West Point in 1822. During the War he held several commanding posts. He was severely wounded while leading one of two divisions on the flank march at the 1st Bull Run. After his recovery and service in other posts - including replacing the command of General John C. Fremont - in late 1862, Hunter found himself in South Carolina. Hunter would infuriate Confederates in that state by announcing the "abolition" of slavery in the department and forming the 1st South Carolina Colored Infantry. Washington, still hoping for a peace proposal, disavowed his policies. Hunter's policy of burning Confederate land and properties - including the torching of the Virginia Governor's residence and the Virginia Military Institute - earned him a death sentence if ever captured. His presiding over the trial of the conspirators was his last active role in military service. Bold, distinct signature with addition of his military rank on an autograph panel. A pristine specimen. (Est. $100-150)
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943. CORBETT, Thomas P. ("Boston"). Known as "Lincoln's Avenger," Corbett (1832-?) remains one of the most enigmatic figures in history. An extraordinarily eccentric evangelical hatter from Boston who, as a member of the 16th New York Cavalry in 1865, pursued and killed John Wilkes Booth. Corbett was so obsessed by his Christianity that he kept his hair long (as Jesus would have) and even castrated himself to avoid temptation by women. After the Civil War, he removed to Kanas where he was committed to the insane asylum after attempting to break up a meeting in the legislature with a revolver. He escaped the asylum in 1888 and disappeared forever. Signature on a slip of lined paper, 3/4 x 5'. A bit faint otherwise a nice specimen. (Est. $300-500)
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A tremendously rare signature...
it was his blood in the President's box,
far more than Lincoln's.

944. RATHBONE, Henry R. (1837-1911). Union officer and stepson of Senator Ira Harris, a close friend of the Lincolns who accompanied them to the fateful performance of Our American Cousin on April 14, 1865. Seated about eight feet from Lincoln when Booth shot at point blank range, he quickly rose to stop the assassin who stabbed him in the arm. Rathbone accompanied the distraught Mary Lincoln to the Petersen House then fainted from loss of blood. He later served as U.S. Consul in Hanover, Germany where he became mentally ill, murdering his wife (his wife AND stepsister, Clara) in a fit of jealous rage in 1894. He spent the duration of his life in a German asylum for the criminally insane. A Pass to Help a Sick Brother. An interesting war-date D.S., 4 x 2 1/2", Washington, April 8, 1863, beng an official pass granting "permission to visit the Army of the Potomac for the purpose of ministering to the ills of a brother sick in hospital..." Signed by Capt. Henry R. Rathbone. Very good condition. The last example in the market sold for over $1,400. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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Rarest of the Ford's Theatre doctors who attended to the dying President.


945. KING, Dr. Albert Freeman Africanus. (1841-1914). English-born gynecologist and pediatrician from Virginia; helped care for the wounded at 1st Bull Run; long-time dean of the medical school of Columbian [George Washington] University and also taught at the University of Vermont; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1865; wrote the leading obstetrical manual of his day and a landmark paper identifying the mosquito as the carrier of malaria. Autograph Letter Signed ("A.F.A. King"), 3 pages, 8vo, Narragansett Pier, R.I. (but on his Columbian University notepaper), 24 August 1885, to Dr. G.B. Harrison. A chatty personal letter written on vacation; he comments upon the weather, "seashore sleepy laziness", Washington visitors, a possible faculty meeting in Vermont, and "Howard coming down like a ripe apple. The old Humbug!". In fine condition. King, who was among the audience at Ford's Theatre when Abraham Lincoln was shot, promptly joined Drs. Charles Leale and Charles Taft in the Presidential box to attend him. King and Taft manipulated Lincoln's arms in order to help stimulate his heart, and when it was decided for propriety's sake to move him, King held Lincoln's left shoulder immobile as he was carried to the Petersen House. There, King and Taft unsuccessfully tried to remove the footboard of the too-short bed on which Lincoln was placed, and instead had to help lay him diagonally across it. They then helped strip and examine him and cover him with mustard plasters. All three physicians remained with the President until the end, although others arrived during the night to assist, including Dr. Robert K. Stone, the Lincoln family doctor. While Leale and Taft generated plenty of paperwork as U.S. Army doctors, few holographs by King seem to have survived his career in private practice and academia; his autograph is almost unknown in private hands. (Est. $300-500)
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Booth didn't shoot him!
946. CLARKE, John Sleeper. (1833-99). Brother-in-law of John Wilkes Booth; comedian, actor/manager; partnered Edwin Booth in New York's Winter Garden Theatre. Exceptionally scarce ALS ("J S Clarke"). 2 pages, 8vo (on facing pages of a note sheet), London (Eng.), 19 Feb. 1885, to one Field, who had apparently proffered a theatrical tour. Clarke says he is "anxious to go to America" but cannot now "say yes and when I shall be able to decide, I fear it will be too late for your engag'ts. I have become the owner of the Strand Theatre, by which my proceedings are somewhat complicated. I wish I could comply feeling assured it w'd not be a bad thing for either of us." He asks Field to advise as to "open dates &c." Very fine and fresh. Clarke, a boyhood friend of John Wilkes Booth, played with him in amateur theatricals that they helped stage and in 1855 effected Booth's professional debut, in a performance of Richard III held for Clarke's benefit in Baltimore. In 1859 Clarke married Booth's beloved sister and confidante, Asia, and that same year was sued by Laura Keene over her rights to the play Our American Cousin (Clarke sometimes played its comic lead, Asa Trenchard). Despite their long relationship John Wilkes Booth came to despise Clarke, especially for his devotion to Lincoln and the Union, and once actually tried to strangle him for disparaging Jefferson Davis, warning him to "never, if you value your life, speak in that way to me again of a man and a cause I hold sacred." After Lincoln's assassination Asia Booth Clarke found, among papers Wilkes had left to her safekeeping, a letter evidently meant for her husband. In it Booth discussed his plan to kidnap Lincoln ("to whom the world owes so much misery") and concluded with the phrase "right or wrong, God judge me." Whether or not the letter was intended to make Clarke look like a co-conspirator, it gave that impression; and even though he personally handed it over to federal authorities, he was arrested upon the order of President Andrew Johnson. Briefly held in the Old Capitol Prison, Clarke soon afterward sought a divorce, which Asia refused. Instead they moved to England, where he successfully resumed his career. President Lincoln attended a performance by Clarke at least once: on 10 February 1865, barely two months before his assassination, he, Mary Lincoln, and their guest Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, saw Clarke star in Everybody's Friend -- ironically, at Ford's Theatre. (Est. $150-250)
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He photographed Lincoln's deathbed.

947. ULKE, Henry. A photographer and artist of Washington, D.C., was boarding along with his brother Julius at the Petersen House when Abraham Lincoln was brought there mortally wounded, and during the night-long vigil at the President's bedside they ran errands for his doctors (Henry appears prominently in Mendel's lithograph of the death-room scene). On the morning of 15 April 1865, after Lincoln's body had been removed and visitors had left, Henry set up his camera and took an eerie, haunting photograph of the deathbed, with its bloody pillow and rumpled coverlet. This clandestine image -- kept so, perhaps, because Sec. of War Stanton had proscribed any death photos -- was not published until 1965. (At which time it was mistakenly credited to Julius because the discovery print came from his descendants.) The present lot consists of two very rare pieces: a carte-de-visite self portrait of Henry Ulke, a vignette head- shot of the goateed, mustachioed photographer, faintly hand-tinted, bearing his 1867-dated backmark, and in very fine condition; plus a partly printed receipt filled out by Henry Ulke, signed in full, 1 page, oblong 8vo, Washington, D.C., 13 Sep. 1867, acknowledging payment from "Genl Spinner" (U.S. Treasurer Francis E. Spinner) for photos of Josie Spinner, including some made on 4 April 1865, ten days before Abraham Lincoln's murder (Gen. Spinner's famously ornate signature is found on Civil War fractional currency and the first greenbacks). Slightly trimmed at sides, just touching a bit of Ulke's writing; folds soiled on verso, with a bold docket by Spinner that shows through slightly to the front, but well clear of Ulke's signature. A remarkable assassination-related autograph and image - we have never seen either before! (Est. $300-500)
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Perhaps the most unique document expressing grief from overseas - the Bengal Chamber of Commerce in Calcutta forwards a Resolution on behalf of "Her Majesty's subjects," those in "British India."

948. Three page manuscript document on printed letterhead from the Bengal Chamber of Commerce, Calcutta, June 8, 1865, to the President of the Chamber of Commerce, New York. In part: "The intelligence of the assassination of the President... has been received in the Metropolis of British India with the profoundest emotion. All classes of Her Majesty's subjects, capable of appreciating the nature and extent of that great national calamity, have been overwhelmed with deep and heartfelt sorrow, and with horror at the appalling crime which terminated the valuable life of your illustrious Chief Magistrate..." The document details delivery of an official Resolution expressing sorrow to the Consul for the United States to be presented to the Secretary of State in Washington. A "True Copy" of that very resolution (the issue sent to Seward is not believed to remain extant) is enclosed - on its own, an evocative document that could be framed to bear testimony to the worldwide impact of what took place in April 1865. "Resolution. That this meeting desires to place on record the horror with which they, in common with all ranks and classes of Her Majesty's subjects, view the assassination of the late Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States of America; the deep sympathy which they feel for the people of that country under the great national calamity which this event has brought upon them; and their earnest hope that the war from which they have suffered so severely may soon be brought to a close and be followed by peace, lasting and prosperous." An absolutely superior and special item.
(Est. $1,000-2,000)
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949. A rare testimonial sent to prominent Civil War personalities (this example sent to Maj. General and Governor of New York Edwin D. Morgan) regarding the attempted assassination of Secretary of State William H. Seward on the evening of April 14th and the man who saved his life, George F. Robinson. The circular specifically concerns the sale of signed photographs of Robinson, the proceeds of which would be given to him. This solicitation was supported by numerous distinguished Civil War notables including U.S. Grant, O.O. Howard, Hugh McCulloch, Henry Wilson, etc. The testimonial also prints a letter sent to Robinson on May 5, 1865 transmitting the sum of $1,600 "as a slight manifestation of the gratitude which we in common with the whole country feel towards your faithful and self sacrificing performance of your duty." Robinson's response is also included: "Wishing you all long life to enjoy the blessings of our rescued, restored, and soon to be reunited country..." This is an absolutely wonderful and very important piece of history! The man assigned to kill Seward, Lewis Payne, was a powerful, young Confederate soldier. At the fatal hour of 10:15, Payne entered Seward's Washington, D.C. residence indicating that he had medicine for the Secretary of State who was in bed recovering from a carriage accident. Payne first attacked Seward's son (Frederick), hitting him twice on the head. Payne then encountered Robinson. Robinson was a wounded Union soldier who was protecting and nursing Seward. Robinson was also struck in the head with Payne's knife and knocked to the ground. Payne then attacked Seward. Robinson, stunned by the blow to his forehead, caught Payne from behind. Payne then stabbed Robinson in the shoulder, to the bone, twice! They continued to struggle, and Payne struck Robinson two or three times under the ear with the butt of his knife. As he reached again with his knife, Seward's oldest son, Gus, arrived on the scene and the three men grappled, moving out of the bedroom and into the brightly lit hallway. Payne eventually fled from the scene only to be later captured at Mrs. Surratt's boarding house. Robinson, although wounded, managed to return to Seward's room and found him on the floor. Robinson approached him to see if he was still alive; Seward opened his eyes, looked at Robinson, and said "I am not dead; send for a surgeon, send for the police, close the house." Robinson found the wounds and held his hands over them. A remarkable tribute to a hero in the Lincoln tragedy. This is the only copy we know to be extant. (Est. $1,500-2,00)
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Sec. of State Seward thanks Switzerland for Lincoln Assassination condolences.
950. SEWARD, William. Fine content partly printed document signed, as Sec. of State, Washington, D.C. Dec. 10, 1867. Seward sends a resolution to the Union of Fleurier in the Canton of Neuchatel, Switzerland, reading in part: "Resolution of the Congress of the United States approved March 2, 1867...as a TESTIMONIAL of the grateful appreciation be the people of the generous expressions of condolence and sympathy in the late NATIONAL BEREAVEMENT [of Lincoln's death] which were communicated in so touching a manner...". Boldly signed, some light foxing, still fine. Matted and framed with an image of Seward. (Est. $400-600)
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951. Clear the name of Samuel Mudd! A rare and interesting D.S., 10 x 15", [Boston], March 19, 1974, a resolution of the Massachusetts House of Representatives to President Richard Nixon to clear the name of Maryland physician Samuel Mudd, who was tried and convicted of conspiracy in Lincoln's assassination. The claim was that Mudd's only "crime" was repairing Booth's broken leg (sustained after the latter jumped to the stage of Ford's theatre following the shooting). Mudd was convicted of conspiracy and spent the next four years in prison until he was pardoned by Andrew Johnson. This resolution, noting that a pardon "does not confirm innocence but merely grants forgiveness" asks the President to formally proclaim Mudd's innocence. "Whereas, Dr. Mudd was fulfilling his sworn duty as a physician by treating an injured person of whose crime he was unaware; Whereas, Although history has subsequently revealed that Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, in acting as a physician, was innocent of any involvement in the assassination, as the result of the hysteria of the times the doctor was convicted as a conspirator in said assassination and imprisoned..." This resolution was passed as part of Mudd's grandson's unsuccessful campaign to clear the family name. Signed by House Speaker David BARTLEY and Rep. Francis W. HATCH, Jr. One of only 15 copies issued, this thought to be the only one in private hands. (Est. $200-400)
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952. The Lincoln Assassination - a soldier's letter from Richmond, VA. Three pages, April 19, 1865, on U.S Christian Commission printed letterhead, from a soldier in the 1st N.Y. Mounted Rifles. Excellent content from a soldier in occupied Richmond giving his feelings on the assassination: " ...when we heard the sorrowful news of the president being murdered, and that is the worst news we could have had, we would like to have had the one that done it. I don't think he would hurt anyone else. Everyone here thinks it's the awfullest crime ever committed in America. The boys couldn't have felt worse if they had lost their nearest relative. I think it is as heavy a blow as ever the army had. If they had done as I think they was intentioned and assassinated our general, I would have killed their rebs. If the officers had let the men went, we would gave them what they need. I wish you could see the works around Richmond and Petersburg. You would think I told a story if I tried to tell what I have seen of them. We had a fine time on our raid in North Carolina and we more than made the Johnnies dust with our 7 shooters..." Very fine, with original transmittal cover. (Est. $400-500)
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Writing on Lincoln's death: "This is a day of mourning for our truly afflicted country. A sad finale to the war, one which will engender hatred toward the south..."

953. Written the day after the assassination, April 16, 1865, 4p., by a woman named Lucetta. In part: "This is a day of mourning for our truly afflicted country. A sad finale to the war, one which will engender more hatred toward the south than every other incident of the struggle...We have to go to Boston for a few things necessary for the trip which with house cleaning and gardening which have to be attended to before we leave will keep me too busy to be able to see you before I go but as we shall be back by the 10th of June it will then be a pleasant time for you to visit Lynn and I shall have leisure to attend you. My woman Mrs. Wilder is equal to the cares and is not tired. She is rather too common in her ideas of things generally to suit me. Not so good a cook as Lucy & not half so quick yet she will take better care of most things and do some that Lucy did not. Don't believe I shall ever find one to suit me better than Lucy. Mrs. Bates has returned much to my satisfaction for after you left I felt alone." Documenting the grief arising from that tragically historic moment. (Est. $200-300)
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The Lincoln assassination - a letter on the funeral procession in New York City.

954. Four pages, New York, April 26, 1865, with good content on the funeral procession for the body of Abraham Lincoln in the City the day before. In part: "...yesterday's events, which were more impressive than any spectacle I have ever witnessed. It seemed like a gathering of the tribes of Earth, so multitudinous were the solid masses of men who made up the procession... it took the civic portion, made up of platoons making 20 persons each, two hours to pass any given place.... It was literally a nation's tribute..." Quite fine with great eyewitness insight. (Est. $400-600)
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A remarkable letter from the LAST man to view Lincoln's body at Albany N.Y.

955. Lengthy 6 page letter, 1st 4pgs approx. 5"x8", on stationary of "Fort Edward Institute" w/ illustrations of building, the final two pages are on separate sheet, accompanied by original cover, April 30, 1865 , from Frank Lockwood to his mother in Ridgefield CT. Excellent content describing his visit to Albany to see the funeral procession for Abraham Lincoln and view the body which he managed to do twice - noting that he was the last person to do so, getting to stay for nearly a minute rather than the few seconds the regular rushed lines allowed. Also details his sister's good fortune in getting to see Lincoln's body when it was in her city. In part: "I wonder at Addie's getting in to see the president, for the papers stated that thousands of persons were not permitted to get a look at him, the crowd was so large. Perhaps she went at some part of the day when the crowd was not so very large... I little thought , when I stood by his coffin, looking at his features, beautiful even in death, that any other member of our family had seen him. I went down to Albany Wednesday morning to see him... The crowd was so immense, a perfect jam. I never was so squeezed before, and don't wish to be again. During the day there was one young lady killed by the crowd trampling upon her, and several had their arms and ribs broken... A great crowd did not get in to see him. I saw him twice. I was the last one to look at him, and I stood by his coffin nearly a minute...I saw the procession, had a good view of the hearse as it passed- saw the coffin which contained the one whom all love, saw the car in which the body was placed- I mean the Hearse Car- it was magnificent , and the whole train upon the N.Y. Central Rd., consisting of eight cars, was draped most beautifully in mourning.... It was no trouble, and was no more than the humblest citizen would have done. I am so glad I got to see the man that proclaimed freedom to a down trodden race. That was the first president for whom I voted, and the man everybody, even his enemies, now admire. I never expect to look upon anther such man. The words 'Sic Semper Tyrannis' mean literally- ' So always with Tyrants', but those who have not studied the languages make it read in various ways. The common reading is, 'Thus perish all Tyrants'; but that is not what the Latin words signify.. The term belies Abraham Lincoln, and no sane man will think of applying it to him. He never showed the spirit of the tyrant in anything..." GREAT HISTORY! (Est. $600-800)
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956. Powerful reaction to the assassination from a soldier at Camp Pratt, VA: "...we have had very bad news the Death of our President Mr. Lincoln... Our Nation will miss him." Three page letter, April 25, 1865, from Eubulus Brigham at Camp Pratt, VA, to his sister, with news, speculation, and pronouncements about the great victories that have taken place. In part: "Sister, our land is near at peice a gan...Oh how glorious that sounds even to think of that soon men whom have ben ingaged in this cruel war...will soon be home ward & bring peice home with them...for though it has ben my lot to be out of danger thus far but I have one thing to comfort me. I was always redy at every time when coled on. Can call it good luck so far...We have hopes of Jo Johnsons surender soon, does not mater mutch for soon he will be caught or whiped badley...We have had varey bad knews the Death of our President Mr. Lincon...Twas a varey affecting time for a thing of that kind to happen for we think if he had lived 60 days longer he would of sean the end of the burden that has been 4 long years hanging over his head. Our Nation will miss him & his works but hope Johnson will folow his path & carey his principles out. We trust he will for we know he is a therough & very sturn man. Twas a sad day when the news came that Uncle Abe was ded to see the boats arive here with half massed flags & Bands playing the Death March etc." Brigham enlisted from Dryden, New York as a 22 year old private into NY 1st Vet Cavalry. A fine, handsome missive. (Est. $300-400)
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957. (MOURNING) Pencil letter signed "Kate", 2 pages, Chemung (N.Y.), 16 April 1865, to Miss H. Louise Wynkoop, Poughkeepsie; together with its original dark yellow envelope bearing a 3c stamp postmarked Waverly, N.Y. A brief personal letter by a young girl, who mentions moving, planting flowers, and making candle lighters. She adds: "Of course you know that the President is dead, he was killed at a theatre. We all feel as though we had lost the best man that was in the country." An inked postscript by "J" states "Kate will write to the little girls next time", and the same person has addressed the envelope in ink. (Est. $100-200)
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A relic from the President's Tomb!


958. Lincoln's Tomb. A set of three (3) pieces, including a 5 x 7" slab of marble from the Lincoln burial vault where he lay from May 4 to December 19, 1865. Affixed to slab is a notarized statement from Judge Carl E. Wahlstrom attesting to its provenance and authenticity. Offered together with two extremely scarce stereoviews of Oak Ridge Cemetery: one of Lincoln's Tomb; one of the Monument. Both bear printed legends on the verso identifying the images and advertising the work of the photographer, Marcel Duboce on South Sixth Street, Springfield, Illinois. (Est. $800-1,000)
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959. "Reading the Death Warrant." Mounted albumen by Alexander Gardner on his mount, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4" (11 3/4 x 9 3/4" overall). Number two of his five part series documenting the execution of convicted Lincoln conspirators Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold and George Atzerodt. Tears with some small losses obscure the margins of the photo while the center remains quite visible, repairs to verso of mount. Despite faults, a prohibitively rare photograph. A pristine example would sell in excess of $10,000. A truly important piece from the first example of true photojournalism: the first time an event had been covered photographically as it occurred. A fantastic piece of photographic history. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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960. "The Chair that President Lincoln occupied at the time of his assassination at Ford's Theatre." (Est. $100-300)
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961. A great stereoview by Taylor and Huntington, "Place where President Lincoln was assassinated." On flat, orange mount, exceptionally rich with great detail and contrast, only a hint of foxing that detracts little. Detailed legend on verso with offer for additional photographs. (Est. $400-600)
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962. Funeral stereoview, "Passing Out of the State House after Seeing the Corpse." 1865 copyright by Glover of Pennsylvania, flat yellow mount, an unusual study we have not encountered before.
(Est. $200-300)
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963. Anthony stereoview titled on verso: "Funeral of President Lincoln, N.Y. City. 7th Regiment passing in view." Light foxing in field at top, light horizontal crease at center detracts little, crisp details overall. (Est. $150-200)
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964. Perhaps an unknown photograph... the first example we've seen! A poignant stereoview of Lincoln's home, draped in mourning bunting, horse standing in front of the house. Light wear, else very good. A wonderful posed tribute from after the assassination. (Est. $600-800)
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965. Rare 1892 stereoview by Kilburn of New Hampshire, "In this Room the Great Emancipator, Lincoln, breathed his last." An oddly-staged study from the Petersen Boarding House. (Est. $150-200)
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966. Extremely rare CDV of Lincoln assassination conspirator Lewis Payne, full front and back Alexander Gardner imprints. Payne, a Florida Confederate soldier, had been captured and sent to a Union prison camp but soon escaped. He joined up with Booth and on the night of April 14th attempted to murder Sec. of State William Seward in a scheme to overthrow the Federal government. Payne fled only to be captured later that evening at the boarding house of Mary Surratt, another convicted conspirator. He was hung in July with three other conspirators. The mount lists Payne's alias, and reads "Arrested as one of the Associates of Booth in the Conspiracy". Finding an original Lewis Payne CDV is difficult. This is a special opportunity to acquire a true rarity. (Est. $3,500-4,500)
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967. Boston Corbett carte photograph. A resonant specimen, a rather different pose than those usually found. Quite fine and certainly very scarce. (Est. $600-800)
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968. HUNTER, David. Signed Photograph, a CDV by R.W. Addis, McClees Gallery, Washington. Boldly signed, sharp. (Est. $800-1,000)
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969. Following five days of official ceremonies in Washington, the Lincoln funeral train - bearing the bodies of the martyred President and his young son William - left the Capital on April 21, 1865 for a mournful trip back to Springfield. The route would retrace the 1,654 miles Mr. Lincoln traveled as President-elect in 1861 - with the exception of traveling through Pittsburgh and Cincinnati opting to detour to Chicago. "The Lincoln Special" was pulled by the locomotive "Nashville" of the Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati Railroad. Bedecked with bunting, special black fringed presidential flags and a portrait of Lincoln, the Lincoln train had eight coaches - six to carry the invited mourners (some 300 them); one for the military honor guard; and one with the mortal remains. This carte photograph - and the one that follows - are absolutely exceptional period records of this event. On a mount by Carbutt of Chicago, his imprint on verso, this CDV pictures the front of the train with the locomotive; Lincoln's photograph visibly mounted over the cowcatcher. A rare photograph to begin with... this example is the brightest, cleanest, most pristine anyone has ever seen. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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970. As with the previous lot, another excellent carte by Carbutt. This focuses on the Presidential Car that transported the remains of the President and his son. Honor guards pose at attention to stand watch - when Lincoln's body was removed in each city for the service in that locale, the coffin of Willie remained aboard. Once again, bright, rich, detailed... pristine! (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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971. Rare carte photograph of Booth; a formerly unpublished variant before being discovered and pictured in The Rail Splitter two years ago. This is only the second example we are aware of... and quite a fine one at that! Light age toning, nice detail. (Est. $700-900)
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972. John Wilkes Booth CDV. Scarce carte of Booth in a full length pose, excellent tone and detail. A rarely encountered CDV with previous auction records to $900. (Est. $600-800)
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973. The "standard portrait" of Booth holding his riding crop. Titled: "J. Wilkes Booth, The murderer of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States." Very unusual with this imprint. Bold and resonant image. Excellent condition. (Est. $400-500)
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974. A scarce pose of the assassin. A fine CDV, some age to edges of mount, a nice portrait. (Est. $400-500)
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975. Booth CDV on board titled on verso "Murderer of Abraham Lincoln." Sliight trim to bottom of board, light typical age. It was copies of this pose that were affixed to the famous "Wanted" posters. (Est. $100-150)
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976.
Booth CDV by Bufford, 1865 copyright . A very fine example in excellent condition. (Est. $150-200)
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977. John Wilkes Booth. A fine from-life CDV photo with C. D. Fredricks imprint on verso, very light mottling, overall fine. Housed in a wooden "rail" frame (8 1/2 x 9 1/2") with gold trim and archival matting. (Est. $200-300)
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978. Excellent Booth CDV, an oval albumen with embossed patriotic elements. Framed with archival mat in an elegant frame. (Est. $150-200)
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979. An interesting carte by Macoy & Herwig of New York, 1865 titled on verso J. Wilkes Booth, The Assassin. Oval albumen is quite fine, the surrounding board has been darkened by someone at the time. Clipped corners, unusual example. (Est. $100-150)
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980. "Booth & His Associates." Clipped corners, overall a fine composite of all the conspirators. (Est. $150-200)
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981. Booth confronted by spirit of Lincoln. "The Assassin's Vision" by Francis Hacker of Rhode Island. Booth, on horseback, drops his dagger as he sees little heads of Lincoln popping out on trees and a standing figure appearing between tree trunks. A fine example; an odd souvenir of a tragic event. (Est. $200-250)
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982. A young Edwin Booth, CDV by Fredricks of New York. A handsome example. (Est. $75-100)
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983. Edwin Booth as Hamlet, c. 1870, by Sarony. (Est. $60-80)
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984. Edwin Booth by Patterson, his paste-down label on verso of titled mount. Quite fine. (Est. $50-100)
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985. The master thespian on titled board. (Est. $50-80)
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986. Maggie Mitchell by Gurney & Sons, revenue stamp on verso. Margaret Julia "Maggie" Mitchell (1832-1918) first took the stage as a child in New York; she was considered a "star" as early as 1851. Openly sympathetic to the Confederate cause, she became quite close to Booth and, in fact, sponsored his first benefit performance. A great carte portrait of the young beauty. (Est. $100-150)
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987. The Lincoln funeral train at Union Station on mount by A.A. Barnes of Indianapolis. An unusual CDV in that it appears to be a copy of half a stereoview; no doubt "captured" to satisfy regional demand for such keepsakes in Indy. Light typical age, great contrast. (Est. $150-250)
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988. A fabulous carte from the Philadelphia funeral procession, one of the largest such observances. A great CDV picturing the impressive bier and catafalque. (Est. $300-500)
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989. John P. Hale, Senator, noted abolitionist and Free Soil candidate for President in 1852, and... the father of Booth's lover, Lucy. Light typical age, by Brady. (Est. $80-100)
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990. He officiated at Lincoln's funeral in Springfield. Reverend Matthew Simpson. (1811-84) During the War, Simpson led a congregation in Philadelphia. His powers as an orator were profound - Lincoln regarded him as the greatest speaker he ever heard, and at the funeral in Illinois, Bishop Simpson led the service. Considered one of the most influential religious and spiritual leaders of the second half of the 19th century. A scarce carte by Pach. (Est. $100-150)
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991. Man wearing Lincoln mourning arm badge. A carte by Whitaker & Co., Philadelphia. Admirers of President Lincoln were photographed wearing such badges during the mourning period, April-May 1865. A wonderful photo, 1865 cancelled revenue stamp on verso. (Est. $200-300)
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992. President Lincoln's Farewell Address to his Old Neighbors. Springfield, February 12, 1861. Text beneath image of Columbia mourning at Lincoln's bier, carte by Casper M. Jones of Indianapolis. Excellent. (Est. $80-120)
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993. Edwin Booth cabinet card by Sarony. Great tones and in excellent condition. (Est. $40-60)
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994. A very rare and early salt print of Laura Keene, circa 1858-9, 5 x 6" oval, mounted. Slightly faded, cockled, else fine. Early photos predating the War are rare. (Est. $300-600)
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995. The Lincoln Home in Springfield, draped for the funeral. A crisp and sharp silver print produced from the original Brady negative by Frederick Meserve. An unusually detailed photo of the home - one can discern the faces of the people standing on the sidewalk. No visible defects, housed in an oval frame, 16 x 14". (Est. $500-750)
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996. "Lincoln Funeral Procession, New York City". A magic lantern slide, circa turn-of-the-century, 4 x 3 1/4", produced by the New York Education Dept. Visual Instruction Division. Made from a print in the Meserve Collection. A study . The original photo was taken at 768 Broadway on Tuesday, April 25th at 2 p.m. The cortege was in front of a building advertising "Imported Saddlery" and "Dr. Palmer's Arms & Legs." Excellent.
(Est. $80-100)
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997. A set of five (5) glass slides 4 x 3" including some wonderful color images: his first inauguration, the assassination as seen from behind the box, as well as Lincoln on his death-bed. Together with black and white photos of the Macon County Court House, and a bust. (Est. $400-600)
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998. A very clean silk mourning ribbon, 3 x 6", with an excellent portrait festooned with patriotic imagery. One of the best designed tributes on silk; truly mint condition. (Est. $400-500)
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999. A excellent silk mourning ribbon: "Rest! Statesman! Rest! Await the Almighty's will; Then rise unchanged, And be a statesman still." 2 x 6 1/4". A bold design, great condition.
(Est. $400-500)
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1000. A silk mourning ribbon by the Union League of Philadelphia, 2 1/2 x 8 1/2". Light foxing at top, else quite fine. A rare tribute! (Est. $300-400)
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1001. A near pristine silk , 2 1/2 x 9", from the Union League of New York. Clean with very dark lettering. (Est. $250-350)
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1002. Lincoln Mourning Handkerchief. Quite rare mourning silk, 16" square. Embroidered in one corner "Lincoln the good 1865". These mourning pieces were made immediately after Lincoln's death on April 15th. In overall fine condition with some light scattered age. It is actually quite remarkable that this delicate silk piece has survived in this nice state of preservation.
(Est. $700-900)
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Booth on Stage!


1003. Theatre broadside for Booth's appearance at Boston Museum as Charles De Moor in Schiller's Robbers!. May 11, 1864 playbill, noting "Also coming Saturday afternoon Mr. J. Wilkes Booth in the The Lady of Lyons." 14 x 6", wrinkled, ink stain in right blank margin, light age/foxing, a very nice piece. (Est. $800-1,200)
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1004. Mourning Lincoln in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. A rare mourning related item, an original broadside, 6 x 4 1/2" (10 1/2 x 8" overall framed) announcing services in memory of the assassinated President on April 18, 1865: "NOTICE. Agreeably to the request of the Acting Secretary of State, there will be RELIGIOUS SERVICES IN THE German Reformed Church, on Wednesday, at 12 M., to commemorate the untimely death of the President of the United States. The members of the congregation, and the public generally, are invited to attend..." An unusual surviving piece of ephemera (preserved by the great-grandfather of the consignor) that hung on the door of Trinity Church in Pottstown, in original period frame. In extremely fine condition, quite evocative. (Est. $700-900)
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1005. "We Mourn our Loved and Martyred Guide!" A simple, yet poignant mourning broadside, 19 x 24" featuring a woodcut bust portrait of Lincoln. Partial fold separations with minor loss, light toning, several minor marginal chips and tears, else very good. This ephemeral item is a large, dramatic tribute. We have seen a couple of other examples and remain amazed that any survived all these years. (Est. $500-750)
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1006. Tremendously rare mourning broadside. "HE BEING DEAD YET SPEAKETH." A wonderful tribute, the only example we have seen, measuring 13.25 x 17" with thin decorative border, published by Clark & Thayer of Boston and printed by E.F. Rollins of Boston. The broadside features a bust portrait of Lincoln with quotes from the martyred president on the Declaration of Independence (extracted from 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates). Additional elements including Lincoln's favorite poem, etc. The only other example we've encountered sold last year for close to $1,000. This specimen has several tears along the edges into the design, most lay flat, and two areas of tape restoration on verso. Could easily be mended or linen-backed. A wonderful rarity. (Est. $500-800)
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1007. Lincoln's Farewell to Springfield. A black bordered broadside, 13.5 x 18" (15.5 x 20" overall framed), printed soon after Lincoln's assassination by the American News Company of New York bearing the text of Lincoln's farewell message to the citizens of Springfield as he prepared to depart for Washington for his inaugural. According to Basler, this was published in April 1865 and was quoted from the version that appeared in Harper's Weekly on February 12, 1861 with some minor variations in punctuation. With black border. In period frame, one chip at very top border from frame, light dampstains, evenly toned, else very good. (Est. $300-500)
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1008. Sheet music, The Nation in Tears by Konrad Truer. Appears to be complete, not examined out of frame which measures 14 x 18". Very light toning, fine. (Est. $200-400)
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1009. Mourning Sheet Music Covers. A good pair of sheet music covers from the same issue, 10 x 13". Verso bears a view of Lincoln's funeral train passing down Broadway. The second cover, "In Memory of Abraham Lincoln..." with titling on a grave stone. Light foxing, else very good. Together two (2) pieces. (Est. $100-300)
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1010. A fine pair of mourning song sheets by Magnus, 5 x 8", with excellent imagery. One bears an image of Lincoln's funeral cortege passing in front of City Hall in New York. Both very clean.
(Est. $100-150)
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1011. A touching mourning song sheet: A Hymn on the Death of President Lincoln, by James Nicholson. Sung at Wharton St. M. E. Church, April 16, 1865." 4 3/4 x 8". Small loss at bottom left corner, lightly toned and creased, else fine. (Est. $100-150)
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1012. A wonderful collection of Lincoln mourning ephemera including a finely embossed card in the shape of a grave maker; a 2 1/2 x 7 " paper mourning ribbon (lightly toned on verso); a good mourning card by Magee; and a song sheet by Magnus. Four (4) pieces, very light foxing, overall quite clean and overall bright. A fine ephemera group! (Est. $400-500)
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1013. "We Mourn a Father Slain." Mourning cover festooned at margins with black bunting, pristine.
(Est. $80-100)
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1014. An official
invitation to Lincoln's funeral in Philadelphia. A finely printed black-bordered blank invitation from the City Council, Philadelphia, April 21, 1865. "You are specially invited to participate in the Obsequies of the late President Lincoln upon the reception of the remains in Philadelphia, Saturday afternoon, April 22, 1865..." Philadelphia was host to one of the largest funerals for Lincoln as his funeral train slowly moved toward its final destination in Springfield, and was one of the few cities where his body laid in state. Light creases, light foxing on verso, else extremely bright and in fine condition. (Est. $150-300)
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1015. "The Assassination of President Lincoln at Ford's Theatre Washington D.C. April 14, 1865." A dramatic 15 x 11" (25 x 21" framed) lithograph showing Booth jumping from Lincoln's box with blood dripping off his knife and the playbill for Our American Cousin on the rail. Several faint spots do little to detract from this extremely clean and crisp specimen. (Est. $500-750)
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1016. "The Martyr of Liberty." A rare lithograph depicting the moment of Lincoln's assassination at Ford's Theatre with a four-line poem below the title: Hath borne his faculties so meek; has been So clear in his great office; that his virtues Shall plead, trumped-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off. 9 x 12 1/2" (20 x 22 " overall). Housed in an ornate frame with gilt trim and ebony boarders containing finely etched decorations. Very clean. (Est. $400-600)
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1017. "Assassination of President Lincoln, April 14th 1865 at Ford's Theater, Washington, D.C." Hand colored lithograph. A wonderful study in journalistic embellishment of an event featuring some very unlikely hand gestures. Several creases detract little from this excellent piece. (Est. $300-400)
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1018. Framed small folio litho by Charles Kimmel & Forster of New York, "Capture of Harrold (sic) and the Shooting of Booth in the Barn of Garrett's Farm by a detachment of the 16th New York Cavalry under the Order of Col. Baker." Hand-colored in two shades of blue and green. Excellent condition, in a lovely tiger maple frame. (Est. $400-600)
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1019. A rare "Proof" prior to the addition of lettering... a medium folio Currier, Lincoln Lying in State at City Hall, New York. A good sized lithograph, 12 x 17", this was famously rendered with titling as a smaller-folio by Currier & Ives -- this example, pencil-noted as "proof before letters" is the only we've seen in this larger format. Light soiling mostly at borders and margin, else very good. (Est. $400-600)
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1020. "The Tomb of Abraham Lincoln". A dramatic view by Paul Dixon after a sketch by W. Wand, engraved and published by John C. McRae of New York. 18 x 13" overall, small tear affecting title, two minor losses at corners, else fine. (Est. $200-300)
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1021. "Sacred to the memory of Abraham Lincoln". Mounted albumen 7 x 8 1/2" (10 x 11.5" overall) with bust portrait of Lincoln at center. With three cent revenue stamp on verso, lightly toned and damp stained, else very good. (Est. $100-200)
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1022. A huge presentation: "Abraham Lincoln, the Martyr, Victorious." A striking 1866 engraving by John Sartain of Philadelphia, published by W. H. Hermans, New York, 16 x 21 (28 x 33" overall framed). Extremely clean and sharp and housed in monumental frame with gilt trim. (Est. $300-500)
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1023. The Assassination of President Lincoln and the Trial of the Conspirators, Benn Pitman. (Moore, Wilstach & Baldwin, Cincinnati and New York: 1865). M-674. Frontispiece engraving of the conspirators. Bound in later library cloth boards, attached original titled spine showing typical age, new endpapers, overall a fine copy. 421p. A pivotal work - the first complete account of the investigation and proceedings. Great content. (Est. $200-300)
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The Warren Report for 1866!


1024. Scarce Imprint. George Sewall Boutwell, 39th Congress, 1st Session. House of Representatives. Report No. 104. Assassination of Lincoln. July 1866 -- Ordered to be printed. Mr. Boutwell, from the Committee on the Assassination of Lincoln, made the following Report... (Washington: 1866), 41p., marbled wraps. This was the earliest review of events surrounding the case - a detailed review ordered by Congress. (Est. $80-120)
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1025. Bingham, John. Trial of the Conspirators for the Assassination of President Lincoln, & Argument of John A. Bingham, Special Judge Advocate. Washington, D.C., Government Printing Office, 122p., 1865. Titled brown wraps, contents bright and tight, unimportant vertical fold. John Armor Bingham (1815-1900), an Ohio Congressman, principal in the impeachment of President Johnson, was Judge Advocate General in the trial of the conspirators. It was his part as the Judge Advocate to bully the defense witnesses and assert in his summary of the evidence that the rebellion was "simply a criminal conspiracy and a gigantic assassination [in which] Jefferson Davis is as clearly proven guilty as is John Wilkes Booth." In defending the legality of the military court commissioned by President Johnson, he argued that the Executive could exercise all sorts of extra-Constitutional powers, even to "string up the culprits without any court." A fine, scarce imprint. (Est. $150-200)


Appropriate reading for the
current administration. (History repeats itself!)


1026. (CONSPIRACY TRIAL) Printed pamphlet, Opinion on the Constitutional Power of the Military to Try and Execute the Assassins of the President (cover title), 16 pages, 8vo, stitched, titled wraps. Washington, D.C.: 1865. Monaghan 739. A close argument touching upon the laws of war, covert enemies, habeas corpus, etc., written by Kentuckian James Speed, Lincoln's Attorney General and brother of Joshua F., his "most intimate friend." Speed concludes that if the assassination conspirators broke the laws of war, it "would be as wrong for the military to hand them over to the civil courts, as it would be in a civil court to convict a man of murder who had, in time of war, killed another in battle." Moderate cover wear, light diagonal crease and text foxing, but a very good example of this key entry in the endless dispute over the legitimacy of the Lincoln conspiracy trial. (Est. $100-150)
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1027. The first notice to Congress on the capture of fugitive conspirator John Surratt!! A near perfect copy of M-897, Woodbrige, Fredrick E., 39th Congress, 2d Session. House of Representatives. Report No. 33. John H. Surratt. March 2, 1867... (1867) 18p., titled wraps. A few nicks from previous binding, else very clean, very fine. (Est. $100-150)
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1028. John Buckingham, the door keeper at Ford's Theatre made quite a living reprinting souvenir issues of the original Playbill for April 14, 1865. Offered here: a rare edition of his recollections of the events of April 1865, Reminisces and Souvenirs of the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln. (Washington: Press of Rufus H. Darby, 1894), 89p., illus., green titled wraps. M-1138. This is the very copy that sold at the famous 1921 Henkels Lincolniana sale. Cover detached and repaired, else fine. Together with a mounted albumen, 3 1/2 x 10 1/2", of the original playbill - this souvenir issued in 1890 by J.E. Buckingham, Jr. A few faults to mount, light creases, else very good. Two pieces. (Est. $150-250)
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1029. A set of four (4) photographs including a cabinet card of a Lincoln / Garfield mourning montage; a mounted albumen 5 x 7" on a 6 1/2 x 8 3/4" board of a Lincoln mourning print by Magnus; a 5 1/2 x 3 1/2" real photo postcard (postal used) of a large group assembled in front of Lincoln's house at Springfield, 1908, several pin holes in photo; a mounted albumen 6 x 5" overall of the "Site of Hannah Armstrong - Wilcox's house near Old Salem. The mother of 'Duff' Armstrong, whom Lincoln cleared of murder..." Together four (4) pieces in very good condition. (OPEN)
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1030. Mourning Lincoln through the Years. A good set of four (4) pieces of printed ephemera (5 1/2 x 8 3/4" ea.) including "Remarks of Hon. James A. Garfield, In the House of Representatives, April 14, 1866. On the First Anniversary of the Death of Abraham Lincoln..." Together with two programs for memorial services held in Springfield, 1881 and 1888, and an imprint transcribing "Hymns Used at the Lincoln Memorial Service..., April, 1865..." A few marginal tears, usual folds, else very good. (Est. $50-75)
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1031. Four (4) National Lincoln Monument printed notices. The first, from May or June of 1865, is a folded sheet entitled "National Lincoln Monument. Description of Grounds." Provides a description of the monument grounds including "The Monument is to be erected in Oak Ridge Cemetery...the Monument will be erected, nearly in the center of the cemetery and contains six acres...all of which...commands a view of the entire cemetery and can be seen from the city..." (Lincoln had attended the dedication of Oak Ridge Cemetery). Together with a notice signed in type by Clinton L. Conkling, Sec'y of the National Lincoln Monument Association, with the seal of the Association, dated June 1865. It begins: "It is now nearly three months since our whole land was thrown into the deepest mourning for the loss of a beloved and honored Chief Magistrate." The notice goes on to state "It is not an individual or a State project, but a National one; and being such, we wish every city and hamlet in our broad land to be represented by the contribution of its citizens." Also, a notice dated June 28, 1865 and signed in type R.J. Oglesby, President of the National Lincoln Monument Association, printed in response to "many inquiries being made as to the design, the probable cost, of the National Monument..." It also settles the matter of Lincoln's final resting place with: "It is deemed proper that the public should be officially appraised that, in accordance with the wishes of Mrs. Lincoln, the National Lincoln Monument Association have definitely decided to erect the National Monument to the memory of Abraham Lincoln...at Oak Ridge, near the city of Springfield, Illinois." The final item is the original circular letter soliciting funds. A very good group. (Est. $100-150)
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1032. The Lincoln Monument Association. A good collection of mostly printed ephemera related to the Association which constructed and maintained the large monument to the martyred president in Springfield, Illinois. Includes nine documents, 1865-1889, together with a 1926 brochure for the Lincoln Foundation of Springfield. Most in fine condition, save for one or two with marginal chips. An important record from the organization that united 19th-century luminaries and common people alike in energies dedicated to honoring Illinois's greatest citizen. (Est. $100-150)
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1033. A printed advertising circular from publishers Bunce and Huntington of New York soliciting agents to canvass for the nearly completed volume by John Gilmary Shea, The Lincoln Memorial: A Record of the Life, Assassination, and Obsequies. (1865), (M-724). 8 1/2 x 11", a few marginal chips and creases, lightly toned, else very good. (Est. $150-250)
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1034. The National Lincoln Monument. Mounted albumen 7 x 9" (9 x 10 1/2" overall), published by J. A. W. Pittman who adds facts concerning the monument. Extremely light toning and foxing, else near fine condition, a crisp example with excellent contrast.
(Est. $50-75)
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1035. William McKinley on Abraham Lincoln. Abraham Lincoln. An Address by William McKinley, Before the Marquette Club, Chicago, February 12, 1896. [1896], 27p., titled wraps. Delivered in the year he ran for his first term as President. A topical review of Lincoln's career morphed into a political vehicle discussing Lincoln's alleged views of the tariff. (M-1199) Wraps worn with a few marginal tears and minor losses, pages lightly toned, else very good. Offered together with: Hay, John, Speech of the Honorable John Hay Secretary of State Delivered at Carnegie Hall, New York, October 26, 1904. 19pp., 6 x 9", titled wraps. Not in Monaghan. Pages just lightly toned. Two (2) fine items. (Est. $50-80)


1036. Tributes of the Nations to Abraham Lincoln. (Washington, Government Printing Office, 1867.) 930 pages. Substantial volume detailing all the speeches, etc. delivered by individuals and government agencies throughout the world in respect to Lincoln's assassination and the attempts on William and Frederick Seward. Bound in rich, tooled, brown leather, ribbed spine, gilt detailed. Gilt-edged pages, some rubbing and loss at edges and corners, usual light dampstains and foxing, ex-library label, overall fine - and heavy! A great presentation book. Supposedly, only 100 of these special, full-leather volumes were ordered and custom issued for Members of Congress... we suspect the number to be somewhat higher. But... they nonetheless remain scarce and in demand. (Est. $250-400)
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1037. A set of three (3) 1865 post-assassination volumes -- campaign biographies that were "updated" including Williams, David Brainerd, Illustrated Life, Services, Martyrdom, and Funeral of Abraham Lincoln... (Philadelphia: T. B. Peterson & Brothers, 1865), 299p., cloth boards, gilt titled spine. (M-368) Spine lightly sunned and frayed at edges, some foxing; Cogeshall, William T., Lincoln Memorial. The Journeys of Abraham Lincoln... (Columbus: Ohio State Journal, 1865), 327p., cloth boards. (M-455) Spine restored, edge wear on boards, light foxing; The Life, and Martyrdom of Abraham Lincoln... (Philadelphia: T. B. Peterson & Brothers, 1864 [but obviously later]). Pages foxed in places, spine frayed at top and bottom, boards rubbed at corners. Together (3) three pieces. (Est. $100-200)


1038. Claims of being the first author to bring Lincoln to children! A good set of three (3) biographies, primarily regarding Lincoln's youth. Includes Mudge, Z. A., The Forest Boy: A Sketch of the Life of Abraham Lincoln. For Young People. (New York: Charlton & Lanahan, 1867), 321p., violet cloth boards, titled spine. With quaint illustrations and the claim, by the author, that this is the first biography of Lincoln intended for a young audience. (M-886) Boards and spine sunned, pages very lightly foxed. But alas! He was wrong, for we have Thayer, William M. The Pioneer Boy, and How he Became President... (Boston: Walker, Fuller, and Co., 1865) 310p., green cloth boards. An update from the 1863 edition to include the assassination. (M-249) Boards and spine rubbed, pages overall clean; Ludlow, John M., President Lincoln Self-Pourtrayed. (London: Alfred W. Bennett, 1866), 239p., cloth boards, gilt-titled spine. Bookplate on inside cover. (M-864) Pages very clean, boards worn, especially at edges. Together, three pieces. (Est. $100-200)


[Eulogies - published statements of sorrow and grief, provide an interesting window to numerous aspects of the Lincoln story... as well as a trove of historical insight. These were not just pronouncements from the pulpit. In fact, quite a few were delivered only in printed format; never spoken as part of a formal service. Some were authored by leading figures completely separate from any church. In addition to articulating how to address the profound sadness, many attempted to encapsulate the life that was lost - to retell the Lincoln story. And, often these "biographical reflections" speak to concerns - both political and social. Ranging from calls for retribution and condemnation of the former enemy to reminders of Lincoln's call for forgiveness, the content varies widely. The discourse is often laden with an author's specific agenda... separate from mourning Lincoln. Sometimes, to establish their eminence on an issue of concern. What makes these wonderful printed relics so fascinating? They represent the earliest Lincoln collectible in the world of bibliophiles. We have seen numerous letters written at the time from those trying to source published eulogies from other cities with early collectors seeking to collate all the particulars. This is quite remarkable given the very limited number in which most were issued.]

France mourns Lincoln!

1039. French Eulogy. One of the scarcest, most significant tributes from Europe (and we have two copies!): Abraham Lincoln sa naissance, sa vie, sa mort avec un recit de la Guerre d'Amerique..., Achille Arnaud. (Charlieu freres et Huillery, Paris: 1865.) A large work, 11 1/2 x 8" in bright green wraps. Jay Monaghan (listed as #3757) calls this scarce eulogy and war record a "laudatory biography." 96p., it includes a number of wonderful engravings: from a rather unusual study of the martyred President to a depiction of a runaway slave; from a full-page illustration of the battle between the Monitor and Merrimac to a portrait of U.S. Grant. Minor separation at spine with old tape reinforcement, some chips and loss at covers, usual foxing. Great! (Est. $200-300)
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1040. Another example of the French eulogy. Wraps chipped with losses, pages lightly dampstained and foxed, else fine. (Est. $150-250)
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1041. Charles Sumner's eulogy for Lincoln, The Promises of the Declaration of Independence. Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln, delivered before the Municipal Authorities of the City of Boston. June 1, 1865... (Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1865). 61p, (M-756). Sumner cautioned his audience that Black suffrage "is not the pivot of national safety. A mistake on this point is worse than the loss of a battle." Mounting remnants at left margin, pages clean, else very good. Offered together with Henry Champion Deming, Eulogy of Abraham Lincoln... before the General Assembly of Connecticut, at Allyn Hall... June 8, 1865. (Hartford: A. N. Clark & Co., State Printers, 1865). 58p., (M-480). Deming makes the claim that he heard Lincoln state that we did not abandon the possibility of compromise with the South until May, 1861. Toning and mounting remnants to cover, pages quite clean, else fine. Together, two pieces. (Est. $100-300)
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1042. A set of four (4) eulogies including Elias Nason, Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln... delivered before the New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Boston, May 3, 1865... (Boston: William V. Spencer, 1865), 28p., (M-644); Richard Eddy, "The Martyr to Liberty." Three Sermons preached in the first Universalist Church, Philadelphia... (Philadelphia: Leisenring's Steam-power Printing House, 1865), 27p., (M-497); Alexander H. Bullock, Abraham Lincoln: The Just Magistrate, the Representative Statesman, the Practical Philanthropist... June 1, 1865. (Worcester: Printed by Charles Hamilton, [1865]), 49p., (M-429); Christopher Newman Hall, A Sermon on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Preached at Surrey Chapel, London, Sunday May 14, 1865... (Boston: Bartlett and Halliday, 1865) 16p., (M-538). All bear mounting remnants at spine, pages overall quite clean, overall very good condition. Together, four pieces. (Est. $100-300)
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1043 . Set of four (4) eulogies including a signed copy of Hiram P. Crozier's The Nation's Loss. A Discourse upon the Life, Service, and Death of Abraham Lincoln... Delivered at Huntington, L.I., April 18, 1865... (New York: John A. Gray & Green Printers, 1865) 16p., (M-467), signed on the titled wrap: "Compliments of the Author."; C. M. Butler, Funeral Address on the Death of Abraham Lincoln, delivered in the Church of the Covenant April 19, 1865... (Philadelphia: Henry B. Ashmead, Book and Job Printer, 1865) 32p., (M-434); George W. Briggs, Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln... June 1, 1865... (Salem, Mass: 1865) 48p., (M-423); Andrew L. Stone, A Discourse occasioned by the death of Abraham Lincoln... who was assassinated in Washington, Friday, April 14th, 1865... (Boston: J. K. Wiggin, 1865). 21p., (M-753). Mounting remnants on spines, marginal tears, pages overall quite clean. Together four pieces. (Est. $100-300)
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1044. Set of four (4) eulogies including James W. Patterson, Memorial Address on the Life and Character of Abraham Lincoln, delivered at Concord, New Hampshire... (Concord: Printed by Cogswell & Sturtevant, 1865) 24p., (M-668); Joseph Parrish Thompson, Abraham Lincoln; his life and its lessons... (New York: Loyal Publication Society, 1865). 38p., (M-776); Charles Sumner, The Promises of the Declaration of Independence. Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln, delivered before the Municipal Authorities of the City of Boston. June 1, 1865... (Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1865). 61p, (M-756); Adoniram J. Patterson, Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln, delivered in Portsmouth, N.H... (Portsmouth: Brewster & Son Printers, 1865). 30p., (M-667). Several bear light dampstains and toning, some damage to spines, overall good. (Est. $150-300)
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1045 . Set of four (4) eulogies including J. T. Tucker, A Discourse in memory of our late President, Abraham Lincoln, delivered in the First Parish Church, Holliston, Mass... (Holliston: Plimpton & Clark, 1865). 21p. (M-791); Seth Sweetser, A commemorative Discourse On the Death of Abraham Lincoln. (Worcester, Mass: 1865). 29p., (M-760). String binding replaced with staples, marginal faults; Proceedings of the City Council of Boston, April 17, 1865... (Boston: Published by Order of the City /council, 1865) 35p., (M-682); Henry Champion Deming, Eulogy of Abraham Lincoln... before the General Assembly of Connecticut... (Hartford: A. N. Clark & Co., State Printers, 1865) 58p., (M-480). Very good. (Est. $150-300)
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1046. Set of four (4) eulogies including John Fowler, Jr., An Address on the Death of President Lincoln, delivered at the request of the Citizens of New Rochelle... (New York: Gray & Green, Printers, 1865). 28p, (M-514); Christopher Newman Hall, A Sermon on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Preached at Surrey Chapel, London, Sunday May 14, 1865... (Boston: Bartlett and Halliday, 1865) 16p., (M-538). Faults to spine, creases; Wilbur F. Paddock, A Great Man Fallen! A Discourse on the Death of Abraham Lincoln. Delivered in St. Andrew's Church, Philadelphia... (Philadelphia: Sherman & Co., Printers, 1865). 24p., (M-662); Samuel L. Crocker, Jr., Eulogy upon the Character and Services of Abraham Lincoln... Delivered by invitation of the Authorities of the City of Taunton... (Boston: Printed by John Wilson and Son, 1865). 28p., (M-465). Overall very good to fine. (Est. $150-300)
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1047. Set of four (4) eulogies including Richard S. Storrs, Oration commemorative of President Abraham Lincoln, delivered at Brooklyn, N.Y... (Brooklyn: "The Union" Steam Presses, 1865). 65p., (M-754). Chipping to spine and paper wraps; George W. Briggs, Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln...With the proceedings of the City Council on the Death of the President... (Salem, Mass.: 1865) 48p., (M-423); Samuel L. Crocker, Jr., Eulogy upon the Character and Services of Abraham Lincoln... Delivered by invitation of the Authorities of the City of Taunton... (Boston: Wilson and Son, 1865). 28p., (M-465); Christopher Newman Hall, A Sermon on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln...at Surrey Chapel, London, Sunday May 14, 1865... (Boston: Bartlett and Halliday, 1865) 16p., (M-538). Overall, very good. (Est. $150-300)
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1048. Set of four (4) eulogies including Charles Carroll Everett, A Sermon in commemoration of the death of Abraham Lincoln... (Bangor: Printed by Benj. Burr, 1865). 36p., (M-509); Charles H. Hall, A Mournful Easter. A Discourse delivered in the Church of the Epiphany... (Washington: Gideon & Pearson, 1865). 15p., (M-536); [Anon.] Gems from Abraham Lincoln...died April 15th, 1865... (Washington: D.C.: Derby & Miller, [1865]). 23p., (M-598); Wendell Phillips, An Address, delivered in Tremont Temple, Boston, April 19th 1865... (Worcester: Printed by Chas. Hamilton, [1865]). Numerous faults including missing wraps, marginal chips and tears, toning and foxing, overall fair. (Est. $100-300)


1049. Set of four (4) eulogies including, Emma Hardinge, The Great Funeral Oration on Abraham Lincoln... Cooper Institute... (New York: American News Company, 1865). 28p., (M-546); Obsequies of Abraham Lincoln in Union Square, New York April 25, 1865... ([New York]: Printed for the Citizens Committee, D. Van Nostrand, 1865). 32p., (M-659); William J. Potter, The National Tragedy: Four Sermons... (New Bedford, Mass.: Taber & Brother, 1865). 67p., (M<-678); J. E. Rankin, Moses and Joshua. A Discourse on the death of Abraham Lincoln... Winthrop Church, Charlestown... (Boston: Press of Dakin and Metcalf, [1865]). 16p., (M-689). Numerous faults including missing wraps, marginal chips and tears, toning and foxing, overall fair. (Est. $150-300)


1050. A rare copy of Monaghan 379, by the Athaneaum Club, Commemorative Proceedings of the Athenaeum Club, on the death of Abraham Lincoln... ([New York: C. S. Wescot & Co.], 1865). 36p. With blue titled wraps, lightly toned with some minor marginal chipping, else very good. Offered together with Charles Sumner's The Promises of the Declaration of Independence. Eulogy on Abraham Lincoln, delivered before the Municipal Authorities of the City of Boston. June 1, 1865... (Boston: Ticknor & Fields, 1865). 61p, (M-756). Very good. Together two pieces.(Est. $100-150)
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Selling a collection of eulogies 90 years ago... a great reference source.
1051. A most rare copy of Heartman's February 11, 1914 Auction Catalog, Two Hundred and Fifty-four Sermons, Eulogies, Orations, Poems and Other Pamphlets relating to Abraham Lincoln... 30p., 8 1/2 x 5 3/4" (M-2145). One of 120 copies printed for Charles. F. Heartman - one of approximately ten extant copies known. With pastedown title on green paper wraps. Mounting remnants from a former bookplate on title page, lightly rubbed at margins, else in fine condition. (Est. $100-200)
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1052. Victorian Shadow-Box Mourning Display incorporating a CDV of Washington raising Lincoln into heaven surrounded by a wreath of moss, flowers and sea shells. 8 1/2 x 10 1/2" overall, approximatley 1" deep. An artistic memorial tribute and wonderful period homage.
(Est. $150-250)
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1053. Victorian mourning piece. A touching relic, a black and white silk rosette bearing a hand-cut engraving of Lincoln affixed to the center. Measuring about 3" in diameter, the ribbon bears a hint of age toning, but is otherwise very bright and clean. Housed in a 12 1/2 x 14 1/" wood frame with marbled and gilt trim. A lovely memorial display. (Est. $500-700)
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