AUTOGRAPHS AND MANUSCRIPTS

Note: Corrections made to text after publication of the printed catalog are noted in bold red.


Lincoln crosses party lines to help a Democrat - turned out of office

for political reasons!
A "lost" Lincoln letter now rediscovered.


418. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Letter Signed as President "A. Lincoln," Aug. 8, 1861. 1p., 5 x 8", minor, unobtrusive vertical folds, minor mounting remnants on verso of blank integral leaf. To B[enjamin] F[ranklin] Watson, a Massachusetts man who had been turned out of office for political reasons. This letter, from the famed Marshall Coyne Collection, is noted in Basler (The collected Works...) as one of the documents known to have been written, but the text remained lost. The content of the missive, however, was discussed by Watson himself, the recipient, in an 1895 collection of reminiscences: Abraham Lincoln, Tributes from his Associates.
Watson had served as second in command of the 6th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, one of the first units to march to the defense of Washington after the firing on Fort Sumter. (The period between Lincoln's election and inauguration was desperate, with the spectre of a Federal government collapse looming. Protecting the nation's capital was critical - patriots such as Watson saw their duty and rose to the challenge.) It was this famous regiment that was fired upon by Confederate sympathizers, sustaining casualties when changing trains in Baltmore on their way to the capital. Watson, a young lawyer, was the publisher of a Democratic newspaper and served as postmaster for Lawrence, Massachusetts. At the age of 34, he enlisted as a Major (4/22/1861) for a three-month term. Promoted to Lt. Colonel, he was commissioned into the US Volunteers Paymaster's Dept. resigning on 9/14/1864. During his initial service, political enemies had him removed from office as postmaster. Lincoln signed the appointment of his replacement. Watson, justifiably outraged by political opportunists taking advantage of his absence, protested this injustice. Lincoln, who of course knew nothing of the affair and signed the new appointment simply on the recommendation of party operatives, personally attended to the problem. He offered Watson a number of other posts... but he opted for some military role. But, as detailed years later in Tributes from his Associates, Watson was surprised and gratified by the President intervening to right a wrong, particularly considering politics of the day.
A warm example of the compassion demonstrated by President Lincoln, addressing a wrong suffered at the hands of fellow Republicans: "Your dispatch, which I return herewith, was received yesterday. I sent it to the Postmaster General, with the note you see [not present]; and he returned it with the note you find below mine. I know nothing else of the matter except what you tell me. If I signed a paper, in making the change in the office, it was amongst others, without my being conscious of the particular one. I shall talk fully with the P. M. G. on the subject, when next I see him."
A wonderful letter that was retained by the Watson family until 1953 and later owned by the famed Marshall Coyne.
(Est. $15,000-20,000)
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Lincoln appoints
a captain. A fine letter.


419. LINCOLN, Abraham. War-date ALS "A. Lincoln", as President, one page, 8vo, Executive Mansion, August 2, 1861, addressed to the Secretary of War. "Let Elias Nigh be an Assistant Quarter Master of Volunteers (of Brigade) with rank of Captain". Nigh, an Ohio native, was duly apointed as of August 5, 1861. He was discharged in March of 1863 in order to enter the Quartermaster department of the regular Army, and resigned in July 1864. He was Chief Quartermaster for General Don Carlos Buell in 1862 at the time of rebel Gen. Braxton Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, and later was Chief Quartermaster of General Stephen Hurlbut's 16th Corps. Toning from a previous mat, otherwise very good. (Est. $15,000-18,000)
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Lincoln inquires about draftees.

420. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Note Signed as President "A. Lincoln" regarding some men: "Have the men mentioned within made their appearance yet? And has anything been done for them? May 6, 1861 A. Lincoln". On May 3, Lincoln asked the Northern states for 42,034 volunteers to help suppress the insurrection that had begun three weeks earlier with the bombing of Fort Sumter. Lincoln undoubtedly referres to his draft call in this note. The back of this note contains nine lines of text that refer to Maryland politics of the period and the maneuvering that took place as citizens there veered dangerously close to siding with the Confederacy - which Lincoln managed to avoid by what amounted to a military occupation of that state. Minor repair on verso not affecting anything. A wonderful Lincoln note signed at the beginning of the War. (Listed in Basler.) Signature and text are bold, dark, and quite clean. (Est. $6,000-7,500)
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President Lincoln writes about an appointment at the Oskaloosa Post Office.

421. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph note signed "A. Lincoln", as President, one page, 4.5" x 2.75", no place or date. In full: "My dear Madam, The most I can say is that when the time comes, if it be made to appear that the appointment of your friend to the Post - Office at Oskaloosa, will be as satisfactory to the people there, as would that of any other person, he will probably receive it; otherwise not". Not listed in Basler. A nice example.
(Est. $10,000-12,500)
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One of the rarest commissions...
a Civil War Marine Corps appointment!

422. LINCOLN, Abraham. Partly-printed Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President, on vellum, Washington, April 1, 1862, a rare Marine Corps commission appointing Robert O'Neill Ford as Second Lieutenant. Countersigned by Gideon Welles as Secretary of the Navy. Adorned with the typical iconography of marine appointments including an eagle at top and a motif featuring Neptune and Columbia at bottom center, above the paper seal of the United States. The seal covers another engraving of arms, accouterments and flags, common to military commissions. Lincoln's signature is overall bold and distinct save for a little skipping commonly found on vellum documents. Robert O'Neill Ford, though born and raised in Pennsylvania, first joined a New York 30-day militia regiment at the outbreak of war in April, 1861. He was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Marine Corps on November 25, 1862 and was later promoted to First Lieutenant on February 6, 1864. He resigned in 1868. Lightly cockled with typical folds, small loss at one fold intersection repaired affecting one word of text, light foxing, else very good. Professional archival framing. Lincoln appointed only 100 Marine Corps officers during his tenure in office, making this piece a true rarity! Offered with research material on Ford obtained from the National Archives including copies of his enlistment in the New York State Militia and his resignation from the Marine Corps. (Est. $6,000-8,000)
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423. LINCOLN, Abraham. Partly-printed Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President, on vellum, Washington, August 16, 1861, a military commission appointing Aaron Smith as First Lieutenant in an infantry regiment. Countersigned by Simon Cameron as Secretary of War. Adorned with the engravings including the eagle at top and arms, ordnance, accouterments and flags at the bottom. With orange paper seal at top left. Text and engrossment somewhat faded, light creases only slightly affecting Lincoln's signature. In archival matting and framing with gilt accents. (Est. $5,000-6,000)
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424. The Papers of Major John Frank Hazelton... including his Commission Signed by Abraham Lincoln. A fine collection of seven pieces relating to the military career of John F. Hazelton from 1862 to 1908 including an excellent officer's commission signed by Lincoln. Hazelton (misidentified in official records as James Frank Hazelton), joined the 23rd Wisconsin Infantry as a Captain serving at Vicksburg where his regiment participated in the assault on Chickasaw Bluffs and the action at Arkansas Post. Upon reaching Young's Point, La., three-fourths of the regiment were stricken with disease due to bad sanitary conditions. In early 1863, Hazelton accepted a commission as Asst. Quartermaster with the rank of Captain and so served for the duration of the Civil War. He was brevetted to the rank of Major for gallantry at Sayler's Creek, Virginia -- quite uncommon for a member of the quartermaster corps. Following the war, Rutherford Hayes appointed him American Consul at Genoa. He later served as American Consul in Hamilton, Ontario.
The collection includes (1) Hazelton's Captain's commission into the Columbus Volunteers, a partly-printed D.S., 16 x 12 1/2", Madison, Wisconsin, August 15, 1862 signed by Wisconsin Gov. Edward SALOMON; (2) Abraham LINCOLN, a very clean and bright partly-printed D.S., "Abraham Lincoln" as President, 14 x 17 1/2" on vellum, Washington, March 6, 1863, appointing Hazelton as "Assistant Quartermaster of Volunteers with the rank of Captain", countersigned by Edwin STANTON; (3) C. H. WHITTLESEN, L.S. 2p. 8 x 10", "Head Quarters, 6th Army Corps", May 6, 1865, an extract from Special Orders, No. 97 including an order transferring Hazelton to the command of General Getty; (4) (Andrew JOHNSON) partly printed D.S. bearing Johnson's stamped signature as President, 14 x 17 1/2" on vellum, Washington, May 21, 1865, promoting Hazelton to the rank of "Major BY BREVET"; (5) Rutherford B. HAYES, partly-printed D.S. as President, 23" x 18", Washington, June 3, 1878, appointing Hazelton as American Consul in Genoa. Fold separations repaired on verso, a few minor losses; (6) Chester A. ARTHUR, partly-printed D.S. as President, 23" x 18" on vellum, Washington, January 25, 1884, appointing Hazelton as American Consul in Hamilton, Ontario; (7) (J. Warren KEIFER), printed copy of a letter to Hazelton, March 12, 1903 reminiscing about the past and noting that he was "one of the few of the quartermaster and commissary departments breveted [sic] for gallantry on the field..."
Together, seven pieces in very good to fine condition. (Est. $5,000-7,000)
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425. LINCOLN, Abraham. His franking signature "A. Lincoln" on a 6 x 3" address panel addressed in his hand to the "Judge Advocate General." Interestingly, Joseph Holt was the Judge Advocate General; it was he who presided over the trial of the Lincoln conspirators. Framed together with the franking signatures of Lincoln's vice-presidents, Hannibal HAMLIN (1809-91), "free H Hamlin" on a 5 1/2 x 3" envelope addressed in his hand "To the President Washington, D.C." with an October 16, Bangor, Maine plug cancellation; Andrew JOHNSON (1808-75), "Free U.S.S. Andrew Johnson" on an 6 x 3 1/4" envelope addressed in his hand to "Y. P. Page Esqr. Clerk of the U.S. Senate Washington City Dist. Col." with "FREE" and Greenville, Tennessee, May 6 plug cancellations. All have been matted together with CDVs of Lincoln, Johnson and Hamlin (the latter two, from-life), and nicely framed with gilt trim 26 x 24". Not examined out of frame. (Est. $4,000-6,000)
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Lincoln the lawyer!
426. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Legal Document, unsigned, Sangamon Co. [Ill.], 26 October 1846, oblong octavo, on blue paper. A foreclosure suit notice, written and signed in the name of Hugh K. Cooper, who informs Israel W. Crosby that he will move the circuit court to set aside the sale of real estate which it decreed in the case of Cooper vs Crosby and Silas W. Robbins, "which sale was made by Antrim Campbell, on the 24th day of October 1846, and at which sale, I became the purchaser of said real estate." Cooper's request for a set-aside and a resale of the property was denied, to which Lincoln and his partner William Herndon excepted; but they lost again in February 1847 on appeal to the state supreme court. Before Abraham Lincoln became enshrined in the American Pantheon as the Great Emancipator, the War President, the Savior of the Union, he was Lincoln the prairie lawyer: a man who spent months of every year traveling, often in heat and dust or rain and mud, to a string of country courthouses. There he tended to legal matters of every conceivable stripe for an array of clients that usually consisted of simple farmers, storekeepers, tradesmen and mechanics, widows, wives and orphans. As routine as his cases often were, it was in that moveable arena of pioneer Illinois courts that he honed his logic, his intellect, and his language. It was there that he was afforded field and scope for his wit, his wisdom, his common sense and his compassion; in brief, for all of the aspects of that human understanding which would so well serve a nation when it came to be tried by civil war. It was there, too, that the common perception of the homespun, folksy, humorous Lincoln blossomed into legend. This is an evocative piece reminding us of this great man's formative days. (Est. $3,000-3,500)
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427. (LINCOLN, Abraham.) Partly Printed Document, signed twice in an unknown hand "Lincoln, Linn & Sheldon / Attys for plff". Champaign Co., Ill., October 1857, one page, folio. In this State of Illinois Circuit Court filing, George Hareslan complains that William Keeble "unlawfully withholds" a quarter-section of land in Champaign County, seeking damages in the amount of $1000. Keeble is ordered to appear and plead or suffer judgment by default "and the plaintiff will recover possession..." A fun legal document from one of Abe's many partnerships while riding the circuit. (Est. $700-900)
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Lincoln to be taxed for property
he owns, 47 acres in 1842!
428. (LINCOLN) A fifteen page "Auditor's Transcript" being "An Abstract of lands entered in 1836 lying in the County of Mernard which become taxable this year 1842 and which have not been heretofore reported for taxation." The manuscript document, executed with stunning penmanship, measures 8 x 13" and is held together by the original green ribbon, details all those who owned property in newly incorporated areas of Mernard County. The ledger chronicles acreage, sites and like information. On page eleven under the column of "Patentee" (property owner), we find the name "Abraham Lincoln" along with the date of March 16, 1836 noting that he held 47 acres. While Lincoln owned several properties - received as payment for survey work in Huron - this parcel was purchased from the federal government at $1.25/acre. (Located on the Sangamon River 12 miles northwest of New Salem, Lincoln kept this land as an investment for more than ten years.) At this point in his life, twenty-seven year old Lincoln was courting Mary Owens, doing surveys, and serving with other members of the "Long Nine" in the State Legislature. Another wonderful aspect of this document is the listing of prominent figures from early in the Lincoln story, among them: Stone, Herndon, Rankin, and Smoot. A fine association piece. Provenance: King V. Hostick. (Est. $2,000-2,500)
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New Orleans appeals to
the President for relief.
From Katrina in 2005?
No... from occupation forces
in Louisiana, 1863!


429. (LINCOLN) A remarkable Manuscript Letter Signed to President Abraham Lincoln from members of the New Orleans Chamber of Commerce, large folio sheets (11 x 15"), 3p., New Orleans, ca. 1863. In a lengthy and quite flowery appeal, the leading citizens of the beleaguered city write the President opposing trade regulations that were crippling New Orleans under Union control and occupation. They beseech the Commander-in-Chief for permission to trade outside military lines such staples as sugar, cotton, and other goods. In small part:
"...Under these regulations, no interchange of commodities whatever can take place between parties residing on the opposite sides of the military lines, no matter what their political sentiments may be... A state of things more adverse to the best interest of the Country at large, and less likely to aid in the restoration of friendly relations between the hostile sections which now divide it... It would enable the Commanding General to combine the influence of the Olive branch with that of the Sword, and do more toward conquering hostile sectional feelings than the largest army..."
There is some wonderful historical association to this document. Signed by Cuthbert Bullitt and seven members of the Chamber of Commerce, Bullitt, grandson and namesake of the Revolutionary War hero, was earlier the recipient of what General Banks considered the best letter ever written by the President. Bullitt, owner of the New Orleans Picayune, perhaps the largest, most influential newspaper of the South, was acting Collector of Customs in 1863 and U.S. Marshall for Louisiana in 1864. A staunch Unionist, Bullitt had sent correspondence declaring that Louisiana was, in effect, hijacked by the secessionists. On July 28, 1862, Lincoln addressed Bullitt with numerous philosophical and practical suggestions abouty waging war in Louisiana and the need to occupy the state with armed forces: "Of course the rebellion will never be suppressed in Louisiana, if the professed Union men there will neither help to do it, nor permit the government to do it without their help."
A remarkable piece of Louisiana and Lincoln history worthy of inclusion in the most significant collection.
(Est. $1,500-2,000)
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430. LINCOLN, Mary. (1818-82) First Lady. Mrs. Lincoln's calling card with manuscript sentiment in her hand, 2" X 3 1/4", fine. Quite scarce "Mrs. A. Lincoln" printed card with a black border. The First Lady has written "Compliments of the President &" above her printed name. The card dates after February 1862 when their son Willie died - hence the black mourning border. (Est. $800-1,000)
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The First Lady sends a telegram to her son.


431. (LINCOLN, Mary.) Manuscript Letter in an unknown hand on United States Military Telegraph letterhead, one page, 5" x 8", [Washington], 1861 to Robert Todd Lincoln. The telegram reads in full: "Robert Lincoln Metropolitan Hotel N.Y. I will be there Wednesday evening. Mrs. Lincoln." Note below in another hand reads: "6 / Chg State Dept" Another notation "Sent (abbrev.) 2:05 PM." This was likely sent in August 1861 when Mary and Robert, together with John Hay and Elizabeth Todd Grimsley, traveled to Long Branch, New Jersey and then New York -- returning in early September. During this trip, Mary visited Haughwout and Company and purchased "One fine Porcelain Dining Service of One Hundred and ninety pieces... decorated Royal Purple, and double gilt, with the Arms of the United States, on each piece, for the Presidential Mansion... $3,195.00." This was one of many extravagant purchases for the White House that elicited tremendous criticism in the press. Usual folds, very light soiling, else fine. A fun piece of collateral Lincolniana! (Est. $700-900)
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432. [LINCOLN, Abraham and Mary.] Relics from the White House! Two shards of a saucer from the White House service used in the Lincoln Administration. They measure 2 1/2 x 5", and 2 x 3", smaller one has been glued together. Mary Todd Lincoln chose this design in 1861 and it was known as the "royal purple" of the "Solferino" set. Together with the necessary reference source on the subject: Klapthor, Margaret Brown, Official White House China. (NY 1999). Also included is a facsimile plate from the Woodmere China Inc.'s White house China Plate collection, a display item to articulate how the relic pieces would have looked were they part of an intact plate. If this was a complete piece of china from that famed service, it would command $12-18,000. As is... this affordable relic certainly should be worth...? (OPEN)
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433. LINCOLN, Robert Todd. (1843-1926) Eldest Lincoln son, Sec. of War under Garfield, president of Pullman Company. A fine content and association A.L.S. "Robert T. Lincoln" 2p., Chicago, Dec. 20, [18]94 to Leonard W. Volk asking him about obtaining a copy of Volk's casting of his father's right hand, together with Volk's draft response to Lincoln. Lincoln writes: "A friend who has seen a bronze cast of my father's right hand, writes me to ask whether it is possible to procure one for himself - Can you kindly give me any information on the subject. The Secretary of the Navy in 1883 gve me one & I think he said it was cast at the Washington Navy Yard..." On the inside right leaf, Volk has written an A.L.S. "L. W. Volk" in pencil, 1p., [Chicago], Dec. 25, 1894 replying that "...I shall be pleased to furnish the right hand of your Father in standard bronze metal and deliver same within a week - this would be molded from the first and only replica of the original which (one finds) belongs to the government and...never be again moulded over[?] without the proper dispensation..." One horizontal fold, else fine condition. (Est. $400-600)
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434. LINCOLN, Robert Todd. A pair of letters including a T.L.S. 1p. 5 1/4 x 8", Manchester, Vt., Aug. 28, 1922 to Leonard Volk's son Douglas in Lovell, Me. informing him that he has "...not the slightest objection to your quoting what I said to Mr. Minnegerode in regard to your portrait of my father. The photograph of it... stands before me and I am glad to say to you that my liking for the portrait has increased. It may please you to know that Mrs. Lincoln thinks, from the photograph, that your portrait is the best representation of my father, as she knew him, of which she has any knowledge..." Offered together with Lincoln's original letter to Minnegerode, 1p. 5 1/4 x 8", Washington, Jan. 23, 1922 thanking him for his "...kind attention to me a few days ago at the Corcoran Gallery in showing me Mr. Douglas Volk's portrait of my father. I can suggest no criticism of it at all. Mr. Volk's father made from life the bust of my father which is absolutely perfect as a likeness. Mr. Douglas Volk's portrait shows him later in life and much changed in appearance, but it is to me in every way a most satisfactory and gratifying work." Both letters bear the usual folds, and are in otherwise fine condition.
(Est. $400-600)
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435. LINCOLN, Robert Todd. T.L.S. 1p. 7 x 9", Washington, Feb. 14, 1923 to Douglas Volk, acknowledging receipt "sometime ago [of] the large photograph of your portrait of my father, and I ought to have long ago thanked you for it, but I have been very much out of sorts this winter and as a consequence all of my correspondence is greatly belated. I am very glad to have this photograph and it is hanging in my room. I am glad also that the original of it has found good location. I seem to remember that I wrote you sometime ago that my wife regards the portrait as the most satisfactory one to her of the many pictures of my father that she has seen..." One horizontal fold, else fine condition. (Est. $300-400)
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A remarkable, unpublished photo of the President's son with exceptional provenance.


436. [LINCOLN, Robert Todd.] A warm, touching, 2 x 2 1/2" cased ambrotype of Abe and Mary's eldest child, Robert Todd Lincoln. Born in 1843, this is one of two similar ambros made circa 1855-58. This incredible find, authenticated by Dr. Wayne C. Temple, Chief Deputy Director of the Illinois State Archives (a noted Lincoln historian, author and former editor of the Lincoln Herald) has impressive provenance. The ambrotype originates from the estate of Mariah Vance, the African American Lincoln housekeeper in the decade 1850-60. Vance (1819-1904) lived in Springfield and worked on and off for the family, often taking care of the young children. She was later charged with helping Mary pack the family's possessions and close the house prior to the First Family leaving for Washington. Later, in her advanced years, living in Danville, Illinois,Vance was befriended by Ada Sutton - a woman who fancied herself a Lincoln scholar and historian. Sutton came to own most of Vance's relics, artifacts and Lincoln-related possessions... small figurines, clothing given to Vance by Mary for her boys, little pieces of furniture, and quite a number of photographs. The late Lloyd Ostendorf would meet Ada Sutton in the 1970s and obtain a good deal of her files and records... all with an eye to publishing the now deemed fictitious biography Lincoln's Unknown Private Life. An absolutely discredited record stitched together by Sutton - attributing transcribed quotes to Vance - the book has been dismissed as anything but credible. [Ostendorf was told of the spurious nature of this story but dismissed the matter in the belief that any "evidence" to counter the claims of authenticity were long destroyed. A fire ravaged the property of the person who inherited all of Sutton's material... including the original Vance property. Ostendorf wrongly assumed there was nothing to dispute his "discovery" of an important manuscript. Actually, that was not the case. Vance's oral history, her ties to the Lincolns, her ownership of family relics were all genuine... the "transcript of a Lincoln family oral history" made by Sutton claiming interviews and verbatim transcriptions of Vance's recollections was nonsense. The fact was that Ostendorf was advised of this but went ahead and published the account in 1995. Unbeknownst to him at the time, the fire did not claim the Vance/Sutton property... and gave proof that Sutton created the entire story.] Among the original artifacts kept by Mariah Vance were numerous early Springfield photographs... including one of Henry Remann, one of Mr. and Mrs. Archer Herndon, and the piece offered here. Unlike several spurrious photographs represented as being portraits of the Lincoln children... including one that has now found its way into print as a unique study, this is a genuine piece - and certainly a unique opportunity. We have no way to estimate this one... will leave it for you to determine! (OPEN)
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437. DILLER, Isaac R. (1854-1948) Son of Lincoln's druggist, Roland Weaver Diller. Playmate of Lincoln's children in Springfield, IL. Rare Signed souvenir print after the famous photograph of Lincoln and his boys in front of the family home. Subtitled: "Abraham Lincoln, Willie and 'Tad' inside the fence. 'Little Isaac Diller on the Sidewalk' As Carl Sandburg put it. A squeaking farm wagon coming down the side street caused the lad on the sidewalk (Diller) to turn his head while the picture was being taken." The last Diller example we encountered sold several years ago for more than $350. A scarce Lincoln association item that makes a great presentation! (Est. $250-300)
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438. PENDEL, Thomas F. White House doorkeeper from Lincoln to Teddy Roosevelt; wrote Thirty Six Years in the White House; attendant on the Lincoln funeral train. Scarce Autograph Signature ("Thos F Pendel / White House / Nov 3 1864 Ap 2 1899"), very darkly penned on a 2.25 x 3.5 inch card; minor mounting traces on verso. Pendel, a U.S. Marine at the time of the Mexican War and later Washington, D.C. policeman, was appointed a White House bodyguard just prior to the 1864 Presidential election. As such he accompanied Lincoln to the War Department, telegraph office and homes of Cabinet members. He was made doorkeeper that December with Lincoln's endorsement. Pendel was sometimes mistaken for Lincoln, whom he much resembled, and Mary Lincoln -- who called him "sober, honest, faithful and obliging" -- even gave him a suit of her husband's clothes in order to pose for a Presidential portrait by William Morris Hunt. This resemblance may have helped endear him to Tad Lincoln, who at least once pressed him into service as a secretary (a letter Pendel wrote and signed in Tad's name was long thought to be a holograph of the unlettered boy). On the night of April 14, 1865 it was the fatherly Pendel who comforted Tad, whose mother and brother Robert were at the President's bedside. Tad, learning of the assassination while at a show, came home crying "Tom Pen! Tom Pen! They have killed my papa dead." (Est. $100-200)
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439. NICOLAY, John and HAY, John. A pair of envelopes both titled "from the President of the United States,", 6 x 3 1/2" each, one bearing the franking signature of Hay, the other of Nicolay, both as Private Secretary to Lincoln. The Hay frank bears a Washington, March[?] 9, 1863 plug cancellation. The Nicolay bears a Washington, Jan 19 plug cancellation. Both bear the usual wear and light age, otherwise fine. Together two pieces. (Est. $1,000-1,800)
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440. NICOLAY, John G. His franking signature on an official Presidential envelope, 6 1/4 x 3 1/2", with Washington "Free" Feb. 1, 1864 plug cancellation addressed in his hand, to author Frank Moore (1828-1904) in care of his publisher, G. P. Putnam, New York. Printed at top: "From the President of the United States." Moore, a noted author and editor, was busy editing the ongoing Rebellion Record which was billed as a "diary of American events, with documents, narratives, illustrative incidents, poetry, etc." When completed in 1868, the lavishly-illustrated series comprised eleven volumes. It is most likely that Nicolay was sending something of interest for inclusion in Moore's volume. Also of interest is a very rare example of Nicolay's personal red wax seal on the verso. Surrounding an eagle is the text: "Private Secretary of the President U.S." We have never encountered an example previously. A terrific association piece in very fine condition. (Est. $700-900)
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Elmer Ellsworth's hand-written
autobiography... written shortly before becoming the first martyr of the war,
leaving President Lincoln to grieve
for his lost friend.

441. ELLSWORTH, Elmer. (1836-61) The first Union martyr, he commanded a group of New York Zouaves and, attracting national attention, had become friends with Abraham Lincoln. During the occupation of Alexandria in May 1861, he saw a Confederate flag flying over a hotel, so he went to the roof to remove it. While descending the steps, the owner of the hotel shot him dead, and the North mourned the loss of its first war hero.
This autograph manuscript is an autobiographical account of Ellsworth's career and his part in the formation of the Zouaves to serve in the war. It was probably intended for newspaper publication, as the verso of the second page is docketed "Tribune, No. 3, Copy this immediately & send to me." Boldly signed in full on the top of the first page: "Col. E. E. Ellsworth". Written in the third person. In full: "Is in many respects a remarkable man, and affords as truly stated in the resolutions a remarkable evidence of what a persistent devotion to a fixed purpose can accomplish. He developed a remarkable taste for military studies at a very early age and prepared to enter the U.S. Military Academy, but after obtaining an appointment was forced to abandon it. He immediately came west but kept up a course of study & interested himself in the Military organizations of the states & very soon developed some ideas then regarded as military heresies, and which from his extreme youth carried little weight with them, but with his accustomed energy & determination he set himself to work to prove the practicability of his theories & as a means of starting the matter he commenced at the foundation, organized his Zouaves & what is singular, laid out a programme for one year setting the time to a day that it would take to perfect the company & make a tour of the United States, the programe laid out at the start with all its details seemed so extravagant that it was regarded as utterly impossible to accomplish & received no encouragement, but he set to work and every single provision was carried out to the letter & to the hour and resulted in the production of the most extraordinary volunteer organizations the world ever saw & the brilliant tour of the Zouaves which did more to eradicate some absurd ideas about us & reflected more credit upon the North West than any other occurence of the last fifty years. The extraordinary difficulties in the way of this enterprise were surmounted one after another & it came to be a common remark that no one ever knew him to back down from anything he attempted. Mere physical difficulties never weigh with him a moment; he required the greatest sacrifices of his men, & secured their compliance by performing twice as much himself. He possesses remarkable power of controlling and animating his men, which is one secret of his success, as an instructor & disciplinarian. For fourth months previous to the trip he would attend to business during the day - drill the company from 7 till 12 oclock, then study & write until 4 or 5 o'clock in the morning - lie down anywhere, on a bench or sofa sleep until 9 & then to work again. His men believe in him implicitly & never question his ability to accomplish any thing he undertakes. He is now en-route for Washington as one of Mr. Lincoln's suite. His talents will undoubtedly be called into the service of the government." Clear, dark writing. Spectacular signature. Small fold separations. A unique, remarkable piece of history. (Est. $7,500-10,000)
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442. DAWSON, John. (1791-1850) Dawson was born in Virginia and settled a farmer in Sangamon County in 1827. He served five terms in the legislature and was a member of the 1847 state constitutional convention. A.D.S. as Justice of the Peace, 8 x 4", [n.p.] May 5, 1834, a legal document concerning a missing horse. Horizontal crease, light toning at left margin, bottom margin a bit rough, else fine. (Est. $150-200)
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443. JUDD, Norman B. (1815-1878) Lincoln political associate and U.S. minister to Prussia. Judd is best known for presenting the letter to Stephen A. Douglas which resulted in the Lincoln-Douglas debates and Lincoln consulted with him prior to the Freeport Debate. Offered Lincoln's name in nomination at the 1860 Chicago convention. A.L.S., 5 x 8", Chicago, June 30, 1859 to C. S. Williams forwarding a check (no longer present). Usual folds, else very fine. (Est. $100-150)
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444. REGNIER, Francis. Resident of New Salem, one of two doctors who resided there and later in Petersburg. His New Salem office was located between Martin Waddell's house and Sam Hill's carding machine. Manuscript D.S., 7 3/4 X 9 3/4", Menard Co., Ill., August 1, 1853 signing as witness to the last will and testament of David Brank. Light contemporary ink smudges, usual folds, else near fine. (Est. $75-125)
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445. TRENT, Alexander. New Salem resident well known to Lincoln. Trent was a corporal in Lincoln's company during the Black Hawk War. Manuscript D.S. 1p. 7 1/2 x 4 1/2", Petersburg, Sept. 21, 1841, a legal document relative to a case between Trent and Bennet Abell. Light horizontal fold, irregular top margin, else fine. (Est. $120-180)
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[REMINDER: If it isn't pictured here, it can be found on our website: www.railsplitter.com!]


On defending Samuel Tilden - to keep
the country from devolving into ruin
in the contested election of 1876!


446. (BUCHANAN, James.) (1791-1868) A collection of four pieces including three autographs of members of Buchanan's cabinet. Includes a fine content letter of Buchanan's third Secretary of the Treasury (and Union General), John A. DIX (1798-1879). Autograph Letter Signed, 4pp., 5 x 8", New York, January 20, 1877 to former Buchanan Attorney General, Jeremiah Black, who at the time represented Democratic Presidential Candidate Samuel J. Tilden in the battle over the hotly disputed election of 1876. Dix writes to his former colleague: "In the most perilous period of our existence you & I acted together: and I remember no practical question, on which we differed. Is it not possible for us to act together now? Without official position & the influence it gives, we have some claim to a respectful hearing on questions of pubic interest. As one of the old Democratic guard in the better days of the Republic, knowing how dangerous is the exercise of doubtful powers, I cannot think you approve of the action of the joint Committee of Congress in regard to the Electoral votes. I cannot believe you think Senators & Representatives, who cannot be Electors individually, may collectively overrule directly or indirectly the action of an Electoral body. If I am not mistaken, will you not use your influence with your political friends to defeat a scheme, which invaded the sovereignty of the States and cannot fail in the end to imperil the existence of the government? I ask no answer to this note. I only ask you to believe me now, as I was in 1861 and have ever since been your friend..." Black was unable to use his influence to prevent the formation of the committee which was authorized by Congress on January 29, 1877. The committee, despite the best efforts of Black and others on Tilden's legal team, voted in favor of Hayes. Mounting remnants on first and last page, else fine. Offered together with Attorney General Jeremiah S. BLACK (1810-83). Autograph Letter Signed, 2p., 8 x 9 3/4", Chambersburg, April 9, 1842 to his wife updating her on his activities with the circuit court. Loss on integral address panel from seal tear; and Secretary of the Treasury (and future Confederate General) Howell COBB (1815-68), Autograph Letter Signed, 1p., 5 1/2 x 9",. [n.p, n.d.], to a judge very politely declining an invitation to dinner, adding "God bless Georgia". Mounting strip on verso, usual folds, else fine; (Book) Philip Gerald Auchampaugh, James Buchanan and his Cabinet on the Eve of Secession. (Privately Printed, 1926), 224p., 9 x 6", illus., titled wraps. First Edition, signed and inscribed by the author on the front flyleaf, spine frayed, minor fray to extremities else very good. Together four (4) pieces. (Est. $500-800)
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447. FILLMORE, Millard. (1800-74) Thirteenth President. Fillmore was a Congressman from New York and helped establish the Whig party there. He was Vice President under Taylor, but largely ignored. After becoming President upon Taylor's death, he signed the Compromise of 1850, which he hoped would settle the slavery issue for good. The measure, however, cost him the support of the Whigs, who denied him renomination. In 1856, he was nominated for President by the Know-Nothings, an anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic party. During the Civil War, he organized a home guard in Buffalo.. Partly-Printed Document Signed "Millard Fillmore" as President, 1p. 16 x 11", Washington, March 11, 1852. A scarce appointment of an Indian Agent. Fillmore names Francis W. Sea "Agent for the Indians of the Pottawatomie Agency." Countersigned by Daniel WEBSTER (1782-1852) as Secretary of State. Moderate foxing, a few pin holes especially at fold intersections, none of which affect Fillmore's bold, dark signature, overall very good. (Est. $300-500)
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448. General Land Office Book inscribed twice by Millard Fillmore to the Buffalo Historical Society. FILLMORE, Millard. Report of the Commissioner of General Land Office...for the Year 1860, Washington: 1860, 193pp, inscribed twice by Millard Fillmore. The first inscription is on the title page "Presented by Millard Fillmore To the Buffalo Historical Society, Dec. 17, 1866." The other inscription is on the inside front cover and states: "Millard Fillmore To Buffalo Historical Society Dec. 17, 1866." The book contains ten folding maps of Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, Florida, Oregon, California and others. Spine weak with slight separation. Bound in original dark boards. A "Withdrawn" stamp over the "Buffalo Historical Society" marking. Very good. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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The Fillmore Family Album!

449. A most impressive Millard Fillmore relic, an ornate carte-de-visite album kept by Millard Fillmore and his second wife, Caroline Carmichael McIntosh Fillmore (1813-81) who signs the front blank flyleaf "Mrs. Caroline C. Fillmore Buffalo - 1867". The album, 9 1/2 x 6 1/4", manufactured in Paris, is bound in finely tooled leather with ornate brass clasps and contains 76 CDV's (together with a few trimmed engravings) including ten (10) from-life photographs of the thirteenth president including a wonderful seated portrait by Brady with Anthony, New York imprint on verso. Other Fillmore images bear imprints from Buffalo photographers including Upson & Simpson and W. M. Knight. Other cartes include a portrait of Fillmore's Secretary of the Interior, Alexander H. H. Stuart (1807-91). Also of interest are images of several Civil War generals including Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, P. G. T. Beauregard, and Calvin Otis, together with engraved carte portraits of Beauregard, Albert Sidney Johnston, Raphael Semmes, A. P. Hill, Leonidas Polk, Felix Zollicoffer, John Morgan, Fitzhugh Lee, and Humphrey Marshall. Numerous other images include family and friends including many American diplomats based in Spain including "Mr. Perry of Madrid, Spain Secy of Legation for U.S.A." together with his wife "Mrs. Perry - Poet Laureate of Spain" and their two children, as well as some excellent views of Gibraltar. Rubbing to covers, spine weak with some pages loose, most of the cartes are in fine condition. A terrific collection of photographs kept by Fillmore during his lifetime. Worthy of further research. Comes with extensive provenance - an item owned by a U.S. President! (Est. $1,500-2,500)
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The LARGEST known Signed Photograph
as sitting President!


450. JOHNSON, Andrew. (1808-75) Signed Photograph as President, 10 x 11.5" (12.5 x 15" overall), albumen, signed on the mount "Andrew Johnson Washington City Oct 5th 1867" on the mount. From Brady's original with some artistic retouching with the addition of bookcase and curtain. A very scarce photograph signed as President. Though Johnson signed quite a few CDV's during his tumultuous presidency, we have seen precious few large signed pieces - and none this big. Cracked and weak at one corner of mount, a few other minor marginal cracks, evenly toned, else very good. A remarkable piece with verve. (Est. $5,000-7,500)
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451. (Andrew Johnson/Black Americana.) A highly detailed and charged cartoon by Thomas Nast from the September 1, 1866 issue of Harper's Weekly, on a centerfold sheet measuring 16 x 22", entitled "Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction" presenting Johnson as a half-hearted reformer playing Iago to the wounded Black veteran's Othello. Flanked by illustrations of anti-reconstruction riots in Memphis and New Orleans. A few minor marginal chips, horizontal fold at center, else very good. (Est. $150-200)
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Jefferson Davis reflects on the causes
(as HE sees them!) of the Civil War.

452. DAVIS , Jefferson. (1808-89) President of the C.S.A. Extremely rare folio A.Ms. (unsigned), 3p. in pencil, 12 1/2 x 7 5/8, [Beauvoir House, Mississippi, c. 1889], being a corrected draft of pages 11-13, "Cause of the War between the States" in Davis's Short History of the Confederate States. Davis had long entertained a plan of having a competent student of American history write a short history of the United States which, in his words, "would do justice to our people and their ancestors." Friends had urged him to undertake the task himself but he had been too preoccupied with the writing of The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, to which he devoted three years (1878-81). His meeting in 1888 with James Redpath, the abolitionist and amiable managing editor of the North American Review, and their deepening friendship finally persuaded Davis to commence work in earnest on the Short History of the Confederate States. He completed it shortly before his death in 1889. The history was first published by Belford in New York in 1890. Manuscripts by Davis are extraordinarily rare. His wife Varina had acted as his amanuensis for The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, and there has been no auction sale of any part of the manuscript of the Short History in over 25 years. In the present manuscript concerning the causes of the war between the States, Davis contends that the institution of African slavery was not the main cause, but rather incidental. "Ignorance and credulity have enabled unscrupulous partisans so to mislead public opinion both at home and abroad as to create the belief that the institution of 'African slavery' was the cause instead of being an incident in the group of causes which led to war." The misrepresentation, contends Davis, is that "the North is presented as having fought for the emancipation of African slaves, and the South for the defence [inserted: increase and extension] of the institution of African servitude as it existed in the Southern States." He argues at length that the South was opposed to the increase of slaves by means of importation: "[H]er whole history from colonial times when Southern colonies opposed the 'slave trade' in which old England and New England was engaged, refutes the base and baseless reflection. The constitution of the Confederate States, gave no years of grace to the slave trade, but forbade it immediately, from any foreign country other than the slave holding states or territories of the United States, and gave to Congress the power to prohibit the introduction of slaves from the last named states or territories." Using rather specious logic, Davis then explores the point regarding the extension of slavery which "is based on the assertion of the equal right of all citizens in and to the territory belonging to the United States. This equality it was contended carried with it the right of each citizen migrating to a Territory to take with him any kind of property lawfully held in the State from which he migrated. This was a claim reasonably deducted from the fact that the territory belonged to the States in common and the denial of it was resisted because it implied inequality, and was an offensive discrimination. There could have been little if any pecuniary inducement to take slaves into the North West Territory. Persons migrating from the Southern States would probably desire to take with them domestics ... but the same climactic causes which had led to the transfer of slaves from the No. East to the South would have prevented the permanent establishment of the institution of slavery in the States which might arise out of the N. Western Territories... The transfer from a Southern State to a N. Western Territory would certainly not increase the number and dispersion could only tend to comfort and harmony... If the object was ... to confine the institution until by its density slaves should become unprofitable, that is until their labor should no longer enable the master adequately to provide for them... want should compel emancipation." Some light browning, pinholes in upper left corners, a few words faded at folds, else fine condition. (Est. $12,000-18,000)
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453. DAVIS, Jefferson. Rare war-date brief A.L.S. "Jeffn. Davis" as President of the Confederacy, 1p. oblong 8 x 3", [Richmond], Sep. 11, 1862 to Confederate Texas Senator Louis T. Wigfall. "Dear Sir, When your convenience will permit, please let me see you." Very lightly toned, mounted. A particularly interesting note in that Wigfall had been strongly opposed to Davis's policies since his election the previous spring. However, at this point in the war the military situation for the South seemed brighter and perhaps Davis saw the opportunity to win the powerful Texan over to his side. Regardless, throughout the war Wigfall's opposition to Davis never wavered. Wigfall had previously served as a U.S. Senator, resigning in time to view the bombardment of Fort Sumter and participate in surrender negotiations. (Est. $2,000-2,500)
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President Davis considers new weapons of war.

454. DAVIS, Jefferson. Autograph Endorsement Signed "J.D." as Confederate President docketing an A.L.S. of inventor W. M. Clement, 2pp., 7 1/2 x 10", Scooba, Mississippi, September 25, 1862 enclosing drawings (one present) of a weapon to destroy enemy ships. Clement writes in small part describing two inventions. "One of them is intended to be placed in our rivers to protect them from the federal gun boats - The other to throw small shot in the enemy's lines at long range... The Ball is made to fit any sized cannon and is to be loaded with powder and shot and a fuse attached and regulated so as to go off on its Passage just before it reaches the enemy. If the fuse is properly adjusted it can be made to throw Grape or buck shot two or three miles and with renewed force right in among the enemy..." Clement then continues by discussing his second invention for which we have his original drawing, accomplished in pen and pencil (11 1/2 x 7"). Named "The Channel Gun" Clement describes it as "nothing more than a short cannon attached to a shaft securely and sunk on end on the bottom of the river and the other end elevated. So as to strike the hull of a boat coming up or down the river. It can be elevated.... as high or as low as you wish. After the Gun is loaded a tube or rod is placed to it and made water proof by gutta percha or something else. The rod extending out only about twelve inches So when a vessel strikes it the ball will only have a few inches of water to pass through before it comes in contact with the hull of the boat. A cap or some combustible substance is to be placed on the rod so when pushed in by the boat the gun will be discharged under water..." On the docket Davis has referred it to the Secretary of the Navy requesting him to "please examine and report." Letter bears some partial fold separation and light toning. Drawing has some losses due to ink erosion. Overall very good. Excellent content of a sort seldom seen in the marketplace. (Est. $2,000-3,000)
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Two key documents in founding
the Confederacy.


President Davis's first address before the C.S.A. Congress.
455. [DAVIS, Jefferson.] Message of the President. [Montgomery, April 29,] 1861. 24pp., light tanning particularly at top corners, overall VG, original stitching intact. Jefferson Davis's first message to Congress, announcing the ratification of the constitution of the Confederate States of America. Davis compares the southern confederation to the union of states established at the close of the American Revolution and reasserts the importance that each state remain, in name and in practice, an independent entity bonded to its neighbors by common needs, not by a federal authority. One of the earliest and best descriptions of the Confederacy, and a key Confederate imprint. Scarce. (Parrish & Willingham #897). We know of only one other copy currently in the market - that example offered by a leading book dealer for $1,500. An exceptionally important cornerstone document of the C.S.A. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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Jeff Davis's last speech from the floor of the U.S. Senate - the day after his state seceded. A rare Baltimore imprint.
456. [DAVIS, Jefferson.] Speech of the Hon. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, delivered in the United States Senate... the Condition of Things in South Carolina. (Printed by John Murphy & Co., Baltimore: 1861.) 16ps., uncut, only light age. One of Jeff Davis's more important speeches, delivered on January 10, 1861... the day after Mississippi seceded, ten days before Davis left the Senate, and just a month prior to his becoming the President of the Confederacy. A passionate discourse, quite atypical for the speaker: "Did the States agree they never could withdraw from the Federal Union?" This document sets the pattern for the inevitability of the next few weeks. We could source only two copies held in institutions. A similar "final address from the U.S. Senate," that by Judah Benjamin, sold at Christie's three years ago for $5,000. While that appealed to the Judaica market, this is a far more significant and rare document. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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457. CAMERON, Simon. (1799-1889). Powerful Pennsylvania politician and Lincoln's controversial Secretary of War. Autograph Note Signed complying with a request. A handsome example on United States Senate Chamber letterhead. (Est. $120-150)
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Ordering a Naval escort to retrieve
the recently captured Jefferson Davis!


458. WELLES, Gideon. (1802-78) Lincoln's Secretary of the Navy, nicknamed "Old Neptune." Important A.L.S. "Gideon Wells Sec" as Secretary of the Navy, 1p. 7 1/2 x 10", Washington, May 15, 1865 to Commodore Thomas A. Dornin at Baltimore. Five days following Jefferson Davis' capture at Irwinville, Georgia on May 10, Welles hastily orders the retired commodore, on U.S. Military Telegraph letterhead, to "Direct the [USS] Mercedita to touch at Port Royal and say to R. Admiral Dahlgren that he will furnish convoy or man of war as may be required to bring Jefferson Davis safely to Hampton roads." Following his capture, Davis and his family were transported to Macon, Georgia where they arrived on May 13 and were confined in a hotel used as General James Wilson's headquarters. The next day they traveled by railroad, first to Atlanta, then south again to Augusta. By this time the Davises had been joined by Alexander Stephens, Major General Joseph Wheeler and others. The party boarded a steamer at Augusta bound for Savannah. From Savannah, the party sailed to Hilton Head Island where they boarded the steamer Clyde which transported them up the Atlantic Coast under escort of the USS Tuscorora. On the afternoon of May 16. The escorting warship was employed due to the rumored presence of the Confederate ram, CSS Stonewall in Atlantic waters. In fact the Stonewall had steamed to Havana where she surrendered to Spanish authorities. The Tuscorora ran alongside the Clyde with guns trained upon the unarmed merchant steamer throughout the journey. Interestingly enough, a mock trial of Davis was held aboard the Tuscorora, in which the 'jury' found Davis guilty of Lincoln's murder and ordered his execution by an able marksman aboard ship. The designated ensign took aim at Davis through an air port one afternoon, but the presence of Davis's children on deck prevented him from discharging his Enfield. They arrived off Hampton Roads three days later and anchored in front of what would be Davis's home for the next few years: Fortress Monroe. Usual horizontal folds, one minor contemporary ink smudge, else fine condition. A remarkable pice of history. (Est. $2,000-4,000)
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459. WELLES, Gideon. Fine Autograph Signature, as Secretary, from a letter; about 4.25 x 2 inches. Together with an uncommon Levin Handy half-length photo of Welles on black cabinet card, silver-imprinted "Handy, Washington, D.C." (Handy inherited many negatives from his uncle, Mathew Brady, and printed from them, as seems to be the case here; the image is carte-sized, although on cabinet-sized print paper and mount). Slight edgewear; print somewhat light. (Est. $80-100)
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460. Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles invitation. Nice embossed invitation sent to a Miss Augur to come to the home of Lincoln's Secretary Gideon Welles. 2 3/4" X 4 1/2", with the original envelope. Excellent. (Est. $80-120)
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Sec. of War issues a pass to allow Confederate citizens to visit their imprisoned son - held in Point Lookout, MD.


461. STANTON, Edwin M. (1814-69) Lincoln's Secretary of War. Partly printed D.S., filled out in his hand, 5 1/2 x 3 1/2", Washington, February 23, 1865, an official War Department pass granted to "Hon Mr. Arnold & Mrs. Arnold & Mrs. Richard G. Arnold to Point Look Out & back with permission to have an interview with Mr. Eliott Arnold a prisoner of War." Two small spindle holes do not affect text, else fine. A touching, evocative reminder of the heartache visited upon one family. (Est. $350-500)
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The Sec. of War defends the removal of treasonous citizens from New Orleans... a precedent in military law
executed by "Beast" Butler.


462. STANTON, Edwin. (1814-69) ALS as Sec. of War, 2pp., 8 x 10", Washington, November 18, 1862 to New York District Attorney A. Oakely Hall concerning two persons expelled from New Orleans by "Beast" Butler for disloyalty. He writes in part: "The persons referred to were arrested and sent North by General Butler on account of their avowed disloyalty to the Government. I suppose there can be no doubt of the General's right to exclude from the limits of his command any person, whose presence be deem[ed] unsafe or prejudicial to the authority of the Government in a military department..." Not wishing to return them to New Orleans, but conceding that they cannot "do much injury... or exceed in disloyalty many persons who are at large" and having "no disposition to impose needless restraint upon any one," he refers the case to Hall's office. Usual folds, with one minute separation at one intersection, else very fine condition. Great content related to the nature of military rule and extra-legal machinations... habeas corpus and the like! (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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463. SUMNER, Charles. (1811-1874). Powerful Senator from Massachusetts, leading abolitionist, passionate orator, Sumner was the loudest voice calling for Emancipation. When delivering his famous "Crime against Kansas" speech in the Senate during the 1856 Kansas-Nebraska Act debate, he derided positions taken by Senators Stephen Douglas and Andrew Butler. Two days later, Preston "Bully" Brooks, a Butler relative, approached Sumner at his seat in the Senate and proceeded to deliver a severe beating with his cane - one from which Sumner never fully recovered. As Chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Sumner negotiated a peaceful solution to the Mason and Slidell affair. As noted in D.A.B., "His great work was not in the framing of laws but rather in the kindling of moral enthusiasm and the overthrow of injustice. A major force in the struggle that put an end to slavery, he also attempted to hold in check barbarous attempts at retaliation during wartime and maintained peace with European nations when war with them would have meant the end of the Union." Autograph Note Signed, April 27, 1870 complying with a request. A handsome example on United States Senate Chamber letterhead. (Est. $120-150)
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464. HOOPER, Samuel. (1808-75) A Representative from Massachusetts elected as a Republican serving from 1861-75. A powerful lawmaker, he chaired numerous committees and was a strong Unionist supporter of Lincoln. He had been a delegate to the 1860 Republican National Convention from Massachusetts. Signed carte by Fassett of Chicago. (Est. $100-200)
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465. [Group] A set of four clipped signatures including Stephen A. DOUGLAS (1813-61), franking signature "free S.A. Douglas" on a 3 x 1" slip; John SHERMAN (1823-1900), franking signature "John Sherman U.S.S." on a 4 x 1/2" slip; John J. CRITTENDEN (1786-1863), signature on a 3 x 1/4" slip; and Charles SUMNER (1811-74), signature on a 3 x 1" slip. Four pieces, very good condition. (Est. $300-400) --
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466. [Group]Abolitionists and Reformers. A set of seven pieces, mostly clipped signatures of prominent 19th century abolitionists including Charles SUMNER (mounted to a lithograph of Sumner), Gerrit SMITH, Thaddeus STEVENS, Thurlow WEED, Oliver Wendell HOLMES, Mary A. LIVERMORE, and Edgar COWAN (franking signature on a mounted address panel.) Together seven pieces in very good to fine condition.
(Est. $100-200)
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467. [Group] A set of three (3) clipped signatures including Edwin STANTON (1814-69), signature as Secretary of War on a 3 x 1" vellum slip removed from a military commission; Joseph HOOKER (1814-79), signature with rank on a 4 x 1" slip from a letter; Winfield SCOTT (1786-1866) signature in red ink removed form a letter, 3 x 1/2". Three pieces in very good condition. (Est. $200-300)
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468. [Group] A set of four (4) clipped signatures including George H. THOMAS (1816-70), signature with rank as "Brig. Genl. U.S.A. & Maj. Genl. U.S.V." on a 3 1/2" x 1 1/2" slip; Edwin STANTON (1814-69), signature as Secretary of War on a 3 x 1" slip, closely cut at top; Joseph HOOKER (1814-79), signature with rank on a 3 1/2 x 1" slip; and Winfield SCOTT (1786-1866) signature from a document 3 1/2 x 1". Four pieces, very good. (Est. $300-500)
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AUTOGRAPHS - MILITARY
BOTH UNION AND CONFEDERATE

469. ALLEN, William Wirt. (1835-94) Confederate Major General who commanded a brigade of cavalry with Wheeler at Atlanta, also wounded at Perryville. Rare war-date A.E.S. penned nine days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox! The endorsement is written on the verso of a manuscript D.S. 1p., 8 x 10", Gorham Station, N.C., April 17, 1865, a Certificate of Disability for Discharge issued to Pvt. W. A. Lipscomb of the 3rd Alabama. On the verso, Allen writes: "Headquarters Allen Cavalry April 18/65 Approved & forwarded. Wm. W. Allen Brig. Gen. Comdg". Also endorsed by Col. D. T. BLAKELY commanding a brigade at the time. Interestingly, no other forwarding endorsements appear, undoubtedly because there no longer existed a Confederate capitol or military hierarchy. Nevertheless, Allen fought on in the Carolinas until May 4th. Marginal loss and a few insect holes largely clear of endorsement; possibly the last document Allen signed with rank. (Est. $600-800)
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470. A twice-decorated Medal of Honor recipient. BALDWIN, Frank Dwight. Officer in both the Civil War and Indian War. He is noted for successfully attacking Sitting Bull's camp in Montana during the latter part of 1876. Baldwin received his first Medal of Honor for leading an attack at Peach Tree Creek, singularly entering the enenemy's works and carrying away two fully armed officers along with a Georgia guidon. He received his second Medal of Honor for a timely rescue of two white females from their Indian captors thus saving the young girls' lives. L.S. "Frank D. Baldwin" with rank in another hand, on Headquarters Department of the Columbia letterhead, 2p., Vancouver Barracks, Feb. 27, 1882 to the judge advocate general requesting the "Opinions of the Attorney General" be furnished to the office in Vancouver. Service record included. Second page has bottom blank margin missing, not affecting content or signature, else very good. (Est. $150-200)
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471. BEAUREGARD, Pierre G. T. (1818-93) Confederate major general who initiated the attack on Fort Sumter that started the Civil War. He also led with distinction at First Bull Run, Shiloh, and in the defense of Richmond. War-date signed and hand-addressed envelope front panel, hand-carried to one "Col. L. C. Brackett at Variety Club" and signed at top: "From Gen'l Beauregard". Sold with an oval portrait carte-de-visite showing Beauregard in pre-war uniform, imprint by C. C. Giers, Nashville on verso. Some soiling and a glue stain at lower margin, else about very good. (Est. $300-400)
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Slave document signed by fervent anti-abolitionist and future Confederate Sec. of War.

472. BENJAMIN, Judah P. (1811-84). A Senator from Louisiana, Benjamin resigned when that state seceded. In February 1861, he was made Attorney General of the Confederate States of America and was then Secretary of War and later Secretary of State. After the war, he fled to England, where he was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1872. A slavery document signed "Benjamin" in black ink. This unique document states: "The defendants offer in evidence the record of the First...to prove that the mortgage given by Mrs. Lefebre to her son produced nothing...having absorbed the entire proceeds of the property. It is admitted that at and before and since the sale of the slaves by Mrs. Lefebre to her son, they have lived together and that the slaves were her domestic servants". Minor show-through, not affecting the signature. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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Mopping up in Missouri...
cleaning out guerilla strongholds!

473. BEVERIDGE, John L. (1824-1910) Union Brevet Brigadier General. A.L.S. 8 x 5", Cape Girardeau, [Mo.], April 27, 1865 to Lt. Col. Hynes in Fredericktown. Only weeks following the surrender of Lee and the assassination of Lincoln, Beveridge attempts to bring order to the trans-Mississippi West. He writes in part: "If you are satisfied there is no rebel force in that country, you may return by easy marches to the Cape..." It was under Beveridge's command that the 8th Illinois Cav. fired the first shot at Gettysburg. Very good condition, wonderful historical content. (Est. $200-300)
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474. BOWEN, John Stevens. (1830-63) Confederate major general who was wounded at the battle of Shiloh. He later died, as a POW, days after the surrender of Vicksburg - a victim of the harsh campaign to save the city. Very rare war-date A.D.S. "Jno. S. Bowen Brig Genl", 1p. 7" x 3 1/2", Vicksburg, June 1, 1863, a promissory note: "Due Major W. F. Haines three hundred 00/100 Dollars borrowed money. Same payable on demand. $300.00". Signature a bit brushed, bottom unevenly cut, still very good. (Est. $600-800)
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The avenger of Ellsworth's death...
posed with the martyr's cousin!


475. BROWNELL, Francis E. and ELLSWORTH, Edward A. Signed carte-de-visite photograph of "Ellsworth's Avenger." Brownell (1840-94), posed with the martyr's cousin, Edward A. Ellsworth, in a carte by Silsbee & Case of Boston, boldly inscribed by both on the verso. On May 24, 1861 Union troops in Alexandria, Va. took exception to a Confederate flag that flew on the roof of the Marshall House hotel, and Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth of the 11th New York Fire Zouaves decided to pull it down. Having removed the flag, he was shot dead - as he started down the stairs from the roof - by the hotel's owner, James T. Jackson. After a brief struggle, Jackson was then shot and killed by Francis E. Brownell who had accompanied Ellsworth on his mission. Brownell was promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Oct. 24, 1861, and was discharged on Nov. 4, 1863. He was awarded the Congressional Medal Of Honor for his exploit of having avenged the death of Colonel Ellsworth. Minor age, a prohibitive item of exceptional rarity! (Est. $1,800-2,200)
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476. [Daniel Butterfield's Copy.] The Clay Guards. After the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter in April, 1863, the city of Washington, on the border with Virginia, feared imminent attack. Cassius M. Clay organized a battalion of 400 armed with breech loading carbines provided by the War Department to guard the city. The group, composed primarily of non-residents, acted as a night guard in the capital and proved instrumental in thwarting rebel designs on the city. Upon the arrival of the 7th New York, the battalion was no longer needed and was disbanded by the War Department. Offered here is a printed document, 1p. 10 x 12", Washington, April 27, 1861, a printed copy of the formal discharge of the Clay Guards bearing facsimile signatures of Lincoln and Secretary of War Simon Cameron. The document opens with a request from the commanders of the Clay Guards, noting the presence of reinforcements in the city and the fact that since April 18 "the battalion has been on duty day and night, sleeping on their arms", asking the Secretary of War if their services were still required. Cameron responded with his sincere thanks and a formal discharge for the battalion. Likely produced as a souvenir, this copy is docketed on verso "Col. [Daniel A.] Butterfield". Usual folds, mounting remnants on verso, else very good. (Est. $100-150)
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477. The Confederate general who chaired the Montgomery Convention to organize the Confederacy.
COBB, Howell. (1815-68) Speaker of the House 1849-51, Governor of Georgia, U.S. Sec. of the Treasury, President of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, C.S.A. Major General. Free Franked envelope addressed by Cobb to his son, Lamar, of Athens, GA. Light age, one tear at back flap, overall a fine example. (Est. $100-200)


478. He led the prosecution of Jefferson Davis.
DANA, Richard Henry, Jr. (1815-82) Lawyer and author, interrupted his studies at Harvard to sail around Cape Horn to California as a common sailor - an adventure that he used to pen the classic Two Years Before the Mast (1840). He later wrote a standard of maritime law. As a founder of the Free-Soil party, he was active in the anti-slavery movement. With William Evarts, Dana was counsel for the United States in the 1867 trial of Jefferson Davis (1867). ALS as U.S. Attorney, Massachusetts, September 8, 1863, regarding a pending case. A clean, nice example. (Est. $150-250)
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Perhaps the most recognized - and LARGEST - signature of the War!

479. De KAY, Drake. (1836-86) Served under Generals Mansfield, Pope, and Hooker; brevetted Lt. Colonel for gallantry. His huge signature gained fame as the authorization that enabled persons to travel between military lines - at a time when such boundaries and guardposts changed on a daily basis... particularly so for the lines protecting the region surrounding the federal capital. His signature was written with such verve - intentionally so - that it could be recognized in the dimmest of light... even by candlelight. As oft-repeated, a journalist visiting Washington wrote "that fearful signature could be read as far away as the Sandwich Islands!" This is an extremely fine example of one of those famous passes, written on order of Gen. Mansfield, Commanding. 8 x 4 3/4", June 16, 1861, enabling a "Wm. Faxon & Friends over the Bridges & within the lines." Faxon was Asst. Sec. of the Navy. Bold, clean. A great display piece! (Est. $400-600)
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480. ECHOLS, John. (1823-96) Confederate brigadier general who served with Jackson and Loring, later succeeding Loring as commander of the Army of Southwest Virginia. A.L.S. "Jno Echols", 2p., Staunton, Va., Mar. 11, 1874, to Pierre G. T. BEAUREGARD (who also adds a few penciled notes) defending an article written by Lee evidently concerning reconstruction politics, in part:"...I have just read for the first time, an article written by Hon. A.H.H Stuart... he therein refers to the incidents attending the visit of General Rosecrans... in 1868, and to the correspondence between him and General Lee, and the manner in which Gen. Lee's answer to Gen. Rosecrans letter was prepared... He does not do justice in this matter. Mr. Stuart wrote out what they thought ought to be the answer of Gen. Lee to Gen. Rosecrans and exhibited their productions to General Lee, and he declined to adopt either... afterwards a shorter and more simple paper was prepared and handed to him... He took this last to his cottage in the evening, and invited you and myself to join him and confer with him... acting in his presence alone, and principally advised by you... Lee proceeded to cut down and alter both the sentiments and style of the paper so as to suit his own opinions and simple style, so that it was in fact Lee's own presentation and no one else's...Will you do me the favor to write me your recollection of what transpired?..." Docketed in pencil by Beauregard on verso "Letter of Genl. Echols" and noting on the first page that he had answered the letter on March 17, 1874. It would certainly be worthwhile to look further into the subject that was actually being discussed in this letter. Usual folds else very clean in fine condition. (Est. $300-500)
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481. ERICSSON, John. (1803-89) American engineer and designer of the Union's Monitor and the first screw-powered vessel. Good content A.LS., [n.p.], February 7, 1860, likely to his agent, John B. Kitchin. He writes in part: "...I cannot imagine that Messrs. Presard want that 32m. Engine so badly that you should feel induced to let so fine an opportunity slip... the Chilean should have the engine and I strongly recommend your acting accordingly. As to Canada, I suppose it makes no difference whether the engines are sent out there or not, since the proposed patent will be given... by special grace of the Provincial Parliament..." Chipped at left margin, else very good. (Est. $400-600)
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482. FOOTE, Andrew H. (1806-1863) Union admiral crucial in the attacks on Forts Henry and Donelson, and at Island No. 10. A scarce partly-printed D.S. as commodore of the sloop U.S.S. Portsmouth, 1p., 11 x 6", Singapore, May 20, 1857, a bill of lading for "Two cases Treasure... $10000" bound from Singapore to Bangkok. Worthy of further research. Backed with period paper, else fine. (Est. $150-250)
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483. FREMONT, John Charles. (1813-1890) First Republican candidate for President, 1856 (also running on the Rump Know-Nothing ticket), withdrew his candidacy as an Independent Republican in 1864. A distinguished explorer, the "Great Pathfinder's" exploits were chronicled mostly by his wife, Jessie - the daughter of Thomas Hart Benton. Scarce war date A.L.S. "J. C. Fremont Maj. Genl." 3pp. 5 x 8", Wheeling, April 21, 1862 to Hiram Barney in New York concerning the status General Louis Blenker who had been recently injured following a fall form his horse. Fremont, who had just assumed command of the Mountain Department, his last command of the war, writes in large part: "I have received your note inclosing a letter from General Blenker, but from what I learn it is doubtful if he will be with us here. My information is that he was too much injured by a fall from his horse to be able to take the field & therefore would not take charge of the Division. This was unofficial & may not be correct. The other officers you mention are doubtless all with the Division. I will bear in mind your recommendations of them and will endeavour to gain them good appointments for distinction & will see that what they are able to do receives full appreciation & acknowledgement. I have with me several Hungarian officers with whom Kozslay is probably well acquainted. I need hardly say if there is any thing in this or other connection in which I can serve you I shall be glad to know..." Blenker did arrive to serve with Fremont and the two with 15,000 chased Stonewall Jackson for eight days through western Virginia engaging him at Cross Keys. Following this campaign Fremont was offered a command in the Army of Virginia under Pope. Fremont refused noting that he outranked Pope. He spent the remainder of the war in New York waiting for another command that never arrived. Blenker was mustered out of the service in March 1863 and died in October from internal injuries from his fall from his horse. Usual folds, a few tears repaired, light browning and other minor faults, else very good. (Est. $400-500)
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484. Bashing the first Republican candidate to seek high office! [FREMONT] An 1856 anti-Fremont pamphlet: John C. Fremont! "Is He Honest? Is He Capable?" 8p., 6 x 9 1/4", titled wraps. A documentary approach to negative campaign advertising, incorporating Fremont's own correspondence while serving as Governor of California accusing him of serious corruption while in office. Rough margins with some minor losses, disbound, a few scattered foxed spots else very clean. Nice content. (Est. $50-100)
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A very rare example.


485. GARNETT, Robert S. (1819-61) Confederate Brigadier General who became the first general from either side to be killed in the Civil War. While withdrawing from his Laurel Hill entrenchment following the battle of Rich Mountain, Garnett received false information that his escape route into Virginia was blocked. Instead he turned northeast along the ridges and valleys that were more difficult to travel. He had withdrawn under cover of dark on 11 July 1861, but the federal column caught up with Garnett's rear guard on 13 July. For several days the Federals gave chase and skirmished at every stream crossing. While directing his rear guard at Corrick's Ford, Garnett was shot and killed. Very rare A.L.S. "R. Garnett Capt", 1p. 8 x 10", [n.p.], 1854 to his Officer of the Day (and future brevet brigadier general) HENRY L. ABBOTT. In part: "...[You] will instruct Members of the Sections paraded for examination to add the state from which they are appointed to their names on the black board when they are called upon the floor...". Folds, else very good. Garnett is rare in any form! (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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486. GORDON, John B. (1832-1904) Confederate Major General who led a brigade at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and crushed Grant's line at the Wilderness. D.S., 8 1/4 x 2 3/4", a check drawn on the Citizens Bank of Georgia, Atlanta, Dec. 11, 1880, paying himself the sum of $250.00. A few ink spots, signature slightly brushed, one ink-eroded hole, else very good. (Est. $150-200)
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487. HAWKINS, Rush Christopher. (1831-1920) Union Brevet Brigadier General who commanded the 9th New York Infantry (Hawkins's Zouaves). Saw action at Roanoke Island, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. A.L.S. 2pp. 4 1/2 x 7", [n.p., n.d. "A. M. Sunday"] to "General Wilson" (likely William Wilson (1823-1874) writing: "The inclosed [sic] was sent to me with a request that I should join. Am willing but have doubts about being of any value to organization. If you think I could help out, and will propose and find a second, then if I go in, will pay and join..." Neatly laid into a larger sheet, else very fine. (Est. $100-150)
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488. HAWKINS, Rush Christopher. War date manuscript D.S., 1p., New York, June 7, 1861. Just as the regiment was shipping off for Fortress Monroe, Hawkins hastily signs a receipt for last-minute accouterments for most of his men including 720 "Waist Belts" as well as the same number of cartridge boxes and "Baynoet [sic] Scabbards and Frogs" together with 80 "Patent Leather Sliding Sword Frogs". Extremely fine. (Est. $100-150)
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489. HOOD, John Bell. (1831-79) Confederate Lieutenant General who led the "Texas Brigade" at Second Bull Run and Antietam, and under Longstreet at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and Chickamauga, where he lost a limb. A.D.S. "J.B. Hood" 1p., Richmond, [Ft. Scott, Cal.], May 27, 1854 concerning the administration of estate fees, in part: "...rec'd...of administrators of John White Dec'd, the original , of which the above is a copy...". Fold affects signature, else very good. (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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Gen. Hooker's own copy... on Gettysburg!


490. HOOKER, Joseph. (1814-79) Autograph Letter Signed, 1p. on a 5 1/4 x 3" card, Garden City, N.Y., August 1, 1879, to Mr. Kelly, mounted to the front blank flyleaf of his personal copy of Samuel P. Bates, The Battle of Gettysburg, (Philadelphia: T. H. Davis & Co., 1875), 336p., cloth boards. Hooker writes to Kelly, enclosing the same book: "Letter of today recd. Retain the book as long as it will be of service to you. Please say to Gen'l Doubleday that I regret that it is not in his power to see a work that Proff. [sic] Bates is engaged on before the publication of his narrative regarding myself, as it will be likely to make some disclosures which even an old soldier like himself will not be likely to anticipate. The book will be out in a few months." Presumably Kelly did not return the book, as Hooker died only three months later. Below the letter on the flyleaf is an inscription by the publisher, T. H. Davis, presenting the book to Hooker, who was relieved of command of the Army of the Potomac only days before the battle. Hooker's letter is in very good condition. Conversely, the book is in rough shape, boards detached, lacking spine, chipping to pages. Still, a very good association piece. (Est. $400-600)
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491. JONES, William E. "Grumble." (1824-64) Confederate General who served under Stuart at Gettysburg; killed at Piedmont. Draft A.L. (unsigned), 2p. 7 3/4 x 9 3/4", Washington, December [1860] to the editor of an unknown paper. A vitriolic diatribe written in the wake of Lincoln's election as President urging armed rebellion. He writes in part: "To longer persuade ourselves that any thing human can avert the impending revolution is to shut our eyes to reason. The triumphant North is defiant in its threatened wrongs and persistent in refusal of any amends for past injury. Slanders, taunts, and insults have at last done their work. The chains are forged for the South and the scoffing infidels in the Federal City boast of their readiness to close the eternal river. The iron is in the fire and the brand of inferiority awaits us at once unless we evince the spirit of our ancestry. In tones of thunder a voice is heard throughout our land, the south is ready for her fate but it is death rather than dishonor... With the old and the young drills and rifle practice should be the order of the day for we may have to meet the enemy abroad and at home... Organize companies to secure combined action and practice with arms to make it effective. Let the rich give their means and all their time and in a few months the devil in the shape of an abolitionist might well be defied." The verso of the second page bears pencil notes in Jones's hand on rifle technology. Light folds, else very fine condition. (Est. $300-500)
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492. KEARNY, Philip. (1815-62) Union major general who served in Napoleon III's guard, lost an arm during the Mexican War, and led with distinction in the Peninsula campaign. He was killed at Chantilly. Rare war-date signature as Brigadier General on a 3 1/4 x 1" slip removed from a letter. Fine. (Est. $150-200)
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493. KITTREDGE, Walter. (1834-1905) Noted mid-nineteenth century musical performer who composed popular Civil War tunes. His most popular song, "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground" was sung by both sides during the war. His signature on a front blank page of his book Tenting on the Old Camp Ground (Boston: Joseph Knight Company, [c. 1890]), unpaginated, 6 1/2 x 8", with finely embossed titled boards and spine. Minor rubbing, pages quite clean, overall fine. (Est. $100-150)
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494. LETCHER, John. (1813-84) Confederate Governor of Virginia who was succeeded by "Extra Billy" Smith and imprisoned for several months following the South's surrender. War-date A.L.S. 1p. 5 1/4 x 8 1/4", Richmond, Oct. 13, 1861, a letter of introduction for one J. Thomas: "...a native of our State...He is by profession a lawyer, and a gentleman of fine talents...He expects to make Louisiana his future home..." The recipient of the letter penned a contemporary note of provenance at top. Fine. (Est. $200-250)
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495. McCLELLAN, George B. (1826-85). A controversial Civil War figure, "Lil' Mac" graduated from West Point and served with distinction in the Mexican War. At the start of the Civil War, he commanded Ohio forces. Lincoln made him Major General and his success in securing Kentucky for the Union led to his command of the Army of the Potomac. He was an overly cautious commander and always claimed he needed more troops and supplies. His failed Peninsula Campaign and inaction before and after Antietam led to his replacement by Burnside. He lost the Presidency to Lincoln in 1864 but was later New Jersey Governor. A scarce, war-dated ALS, "Geo McClellan Maj Genl" to "Genl M[ontgomery] C Meigs Qtr Mr Genl', February 5, 1862: "Allow me to introduce to you my friend A M Arthur Esq...of the Illinois Central R.R. who wishes a very short interview with you. Mr A. can give you, if you wish it much information about the transportation in the West. He is in every regard reliable." The North overwhelmingly controlled the nation's railroads and the Army's senior Quarter Master General, in charge of funds, probably needed information about the Western tracks. McClellan was then the head of the Army and conducting the failed Peninsula Campaign to capture Richmond. In excellent condition overall. (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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496. McPHERSON, James B. (1828-64) Union Major General, commanded Army of Tennessee. Killed by Confederate sharpshooter during the battle of Atlanta. Partly printed D.S. "Jas. B. McPherson" adding rank, as a witness on a quartermaster roll, 1p., 16 x 14 1/2", [New York, June 1854]. A roll in which the members of Company A Engineers under Capt. George W. Cullum, sign for "several articles of Clothing set opposite our respective names." Usual folds, one vertical fold slightly weak, else very good. McPherson remains somewhat difficult to obtain. (Est. $500-700)
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497. MEADE, George G. (1815-72) Union Major General who commanded brilliantly at Gettysburg, leading to a Union victory and the turning point of the Civil War. A fine war-date S.P. "Geo. G. Meade", a carte-de-visite photograph bearing a sepia 3/4 length image of Meade in uniform. Boldly signed on mount with a "F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia" backmark with a tax stamp dated Nov 23, 1864. This photograph was likely taken in the autumn of 1864 when Meade took a short leave of absence to visit his home. Photograph slightly buckled from mount at top and bottom due to a lack of adhesive, small nick along bottom portion of photograph, otherwise very good to fine condition. (Est. $1,500-1,800)
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Ultimate Civil War association -
General George Pickett writes to Robert E. Lee about one of the last major battles of the war.

498. PICKETT, George E. (1825-75) Confederate Major General who formed the brigades for the ill-fated charge on the final day at Gettysburg. Pickett never forgave Lee for the destruction of his command, and died a bitter man. Exceptional Autograph Letter Signed "G.E. Pickett", two pages, Richmond, Virginia, June 19, 1870, on letterhead of the Exchange Hotel, to Robert E. Lee. In full: "General, I have the honor to enclose a letter received some little time since from Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. In my reply to same I stated I would write...asking you to eliminate from my report the paragraph he refers to, "did not see Gen. Fitz Lee after the fight began", and also any thing from which the inference could be drawn of a disobedience of orders on his part. My report to you of that action was dated Vansemond County, but was in reality written in Canada, I at that time not caring my whereabouts to be known. I of course wrote it without having the opportunity of consulting with any one, but was afraid to delay, preferring to do so whilst events were fresh in my memory, and knowing not then at what time if ever, I should return to my country. It is therefore due to Genl Fitz Lee after getting the explanation from him enclosed to . . . to his requests as far as I can possibly do it. From his letter it is evident that Gen. Lee had communicated the order to his subordinates and therefore is relieved from any intention of his disobedience of orders, further than that I can not go nor do I suppose he could desire it: the fact being that the order never was executed. Since replying to Gen. Lee's letter (a copy of which reply I also forward) I have seen and conversed with Capt. Bright a member of my staff, who tells me he recollects perfectly, the conversation in which I explained my wishes to have the Cav. On the left dismounted, and to act as Infantry (one reason for this was the nature of the ground, being thick with under growth & marshy) and that afterwards when he my message to Gen L asking him the cause of the delay . . . he says Gen L appeared much surprise to learn that the order had not been executed, and sent off a courier at speed to ascertain it, and to see the order carried out. I have no copy of the report at hand, and I have therefore leave it discretionary General with you, and shall have . . . on your kindness to make the necessary corrections. I shall esteem it a favor to have the enclosed returned after .your perusal of , and action therefore - I am Gen. With much respect your Obt' Serv't, G.E. Pickett." The Battle of Five Forks is controversial for the sheer geography of it because it involved four separate fights: Lewis Farm or Quaker Road (March 29), White Oak Road 9March 31), Dinwiddie Court House (March 31) and Five Forks (April 1). The Federal lines were close to Petersburg only along the eastern side of the city. As the lines curved to the west they also tended to angle away from town. At Fort Fisher, a point about 3 miles southwest of the city, the Federal main line actually doubled back and formed a huge enclosed loop. This position was on the site of Peebles Farm, and had been seized during the Fort Harrison-Peebles Farm operation of the previous fall. At this point, the Confederate lines also began to angle southwestward away from the city, covering the Boydton Plank Road. About seven miles southwest of town, the Rebel lines reached Hatcher's Run, which flows from northwest to southeast and was a substantial military barrier. The main Rebel lines stopped at Hatcher's Run, with several strong redoubts to cover the flank, but a further set of trenches had been built to the west, along White Oak Road. This set of works ran east-west and covered the section of White Oak Road from the Boydton Plank Road west to the Claiborne Road. These were the only two roads by which the Yankees could directly approach the Confederate flank. Grant's plan for turning Lee out of Petersburg --- or trapping his army within its lines --- would take effect. Phil Sheridan would lead a cavalry strike force of three divisions out beyond the Rebel flank, to Five Forks, a major road intersection about ten miles west-southwest of Petersburg, and about five miles west of where Lee's lines ended. From this position Sheridan could threaten the rail lines that served Petersburg or the Rebel position itself. Federal infantry would press up to the Rebel lines along White Oak Road and even try to connect with Sheridan. If the way was open to turn Lee's flank then Sheridan was to do so, otherwise he would cut loose with his horsemen and make a large-scale raid on the railroads. In addition to the Army of the Potomac troops, Grant had Maj. Gen. E.O.C. Ord bring two divisions of John Gibbon's XXIV Corps of the Army of the James (reinforced by one division of XXV Corps, and accompanied by a cavalry division under Ranald MacKenzie) across the Appomattox river, in secret, to be used as events developed. Together with Warren's V Corps and Humphreys's II Corps on the left end of the Federal trench lines, this gave Grant three infantry corps (nine divisions) and three cavalry divisions, totalling 54,500 infantry and 13,000 cavalry. Such a force under vigorous tactical direction would be unstoppable. Still, the Rebels tried, and tried hard. Lee's options for dealing with Grant's move were limited. As of March 27, his army was deployed as follows: North of the James: The First Corps divisions of Field and Kershaw (under Longstreet's command), the Richmond defense troops under Ewell, and a division of about 1800 cavalry; Along the Howlett Line (Bermuda Hundred): Mahone's division of A.P. Hill's Third Corps; From the Appomattox River to near the Weldon Railroad: Second Corps, under Gordon, consisting of Walker's, Evans's, and Grimes's divisions; From the Weldon Railroad to Hatcher's Run: Wilcox's and Heth's Divisions of Third Corps; Along White Oak Road, west of Hatcher's Run: Anderson's Fourth Corps, consisting of only Bushrod Johnson's division. In addition to these troops, Lee had the First Corps division commanded by Gettysburg "hero" George Pickett, posted in Chesterfield County as a quasi-reserve, and two divisions of cavalry guarding the Weldon Railroad at Stony Creek Station, some 25 miles south of Petersburg. The Confederate lines were thinly held, an estimated 1200 men per mile of defended line. Anticipating Sheridan's advance, Lee ordered Pickett and all three of his cavalry divisions to concentrate at the crossroad known as Five Forks. Together with Anderson's force along White Oak Road, this would give Lee had a total of only eight infantry brigades and seven cavalry brigades to oppose any Federal force west of Hatcher's Run. Still, Marse Robert had no intention of changing his combative ways. Fitz Lee --- put in charge of all the cavalry --- and Pickett --- given overall command of the Rebel force --- were ordered to attack and defeat Sheridan's cavalry. The Federal columns began moving on March 29th, just a few days after Lee's failure at Fort Stedman, with Sheridan taking a wide circuit to the south, west and then north, aiming for Dinwiddie Court House, a key road junction. Meanwhile, V Corps approached the White Oak Road position from the south, and II Corps filled the gap between V Corps and Ord's men on the left of the Federal trench lines. This led to confused positions of the several detachments confronting one another southwest of Petersburg, starting on the evening of March 31st. Sheridan's cavalry was holding on at Dinwiddie Court House along a line that ran east-west and faced north. Pickett, with around 10,000 or so infantry and cavalry, was facing him. However, Warren's V Corps was about three miles north and east, in Pickett's rear. While Pickett's success of the day had indeed threatened to cut Sheridan off from the Union main body, it had likewise (coupled with Warren's success along the White Oak Road) threatened to cut Pickett off from Lee. Muddying the waters to no small extent was the fact that no commander on either side was entirely aware of the precise situation in time to take complete advantage of it. Both Grant and Lee were sufficiently far from the scene that communication delays often resulted in orders being based on out-of-date information. Grant and Sheridan both appear to have understood the basic situation, that Warren was well-placed to trap Pickett's force and destroy it. Unfortunately, the precise means by which this would be accomplished was unclear. On the evening and night of March 31-April 1, Warren received a baffling series of orders about sending help to Sheridan, some very specific, some vaguely general, all of them acting at cross-purposes, and some arriving out of sequence. Some troops were sent directly from Warren's advanced position along the White Oak Road to press up against Pickett's left rear, while others were ordered to withdraw to the Boydton Plank Road for a direct march to Dinwiddie Court House and Sheridan's lines. In a crucial but often overlooked message, Grant told Sheridan that he could expect V Corps to arrive at around midnight. While this was a reasonable estimate of the marching time, it did not take into account the time required to reassemble the Federal divisions and disengage from the enemy, nor was this estimate modified in the light of the delays in eventually deciding what Warren should do and how he should do it, nor was Grant aware that a bridge over Gravelly Run would have to be rebuilt. As Federal divisions marched to-and-fro that night, some contact was made with elements of Pickett's command. This alerted the Confederate commander to the unpleasant fact that Yankees were in his rear and caused him to order a night-time withdrawal. Pickett's intent was to pull back as far north as Hatcher's Run, where it is crossed by the Ford Road leading from Five Forks, but a message from Lee ordering him to "hold Five Forks at all costs" and expressing "regret" that Pickett had been forced to fall back caused Pickett to take up the fateful position at Five Forks along the White Oak Road. His left did not connect with the rest of the Confederate army and so the entrenchments were refused northwards about one mile east of Five Forks. The gap between Pickett's left and Anderson's right (along White Oak Road) was supposed to be covered by an understrength North Carolina cavalry brigade under William P. Roberts, the youngest general in the Confederate army. Pickett compounded his weak position by poorly positioning the few guns at his disposal; after the war one gunner commented that Pickett "knew more about brands of whiskey than he did about the uses of artillery." For his part, Sheridan spent an anxious and infuriating night. The supporting infantry that he needed to strike a strong blow at the enemy did not arrive until the morning of April 1st. To compound the problem, Warren had decided that withdrawing from close contact with the Confederates along White Oak Road required the corps commander's personal attention, and so he was at the rear of the column of march, decidedly not where Sheridan thought he should be. Warren exacerbated this bad impression when he took over three hours after he did arrive to report to Sheridan for orders. It took most of the morning of April 1st for Sheridan's cavalry to advance and develop Pickett's lines. Meanwhile, V Corps assembled near the J. Boisseau farm. At about 1 p.m., the infantry was ordered forward to the vicinity of the Gravelly Run Methodist Episcopal Church, where they would form for battle. At about this time Sheridan and Warren held a brief conference, at which the plan of battle was decided upon. While the cavalry demonstrated against the Confederate front, V Corps would march forward on a diagonal course to the northwest and strike the "knuckle" where the Rebel line was refused, thus caving in the enemy defenses. Sheridan was greatly upset at what he thought were the continuing delays in Warren getting his troops formed. Two tragic problems arose. The knuckle was not where Sheridan and Warren thought it was, it being some distance to the west. Thus V Corps, if undisturbed, would march forward into empty space behind Pickett's lines. Secondly, Sheridan had received a note from Grant authorizing him to replace Warren if he (Sheridan) felt that V Corps would perform better under one of the division commanders. This order was sent primarily as a result of a courier's report from late that morning, to the effect that V Corps was hung up crossing Gravelly Run. While there had been a delay at that crossing it had been brief and did not contribute substantially to subsequent events, the courier's report did not reach Grant's headquarters until much later, and it created the impression that V Corps was still delayed in its march to support Sheridan. Thus Grant thought that Warren had dallied too much in crossing a small creek. At 4:15 p.m. on April 1st, while Sheridan's troopers skirmished with Pickett's main line, Warren's infantry marched off into the gap beyond Pickett's left. From Sheridan's perspective, however, things were going badly wrong, since his supporting infantry was not engaging the enemy. To compound the error, Warren --- who understood at least part of the problem, and had ridden off to correct Crawford's direction of march --- could not be found to rectify the situation. It was at about 5:00 p.m. that the weight of the Federal infantry began to quickly overwhelm Pickett's left flank. Ayres's attack overlapped the two thin brigades (Wallace's South Carolininas and Ransom's North Carolinians) holding the refused line and nearby front. While this success did disorganize Ayres's troops somewhat, Griffin's division was immediately at hand to follow up the initial success. Unable to hold the onslaught, Confederate resistance collapsed. Pickett himself, and several of his senior subordinates --- including Fitz Lee --- were blissfully unaware that a battle had even opened, having repaired northward along the Ford Road to Hatcher's Run for the infamous shad bake. The Confederates tried to make a stand at several points along their line as Ayres and Griffin rolled up the flank, but it was to no avail, and most of the Confederate force was pushed westwards. Warren finally got Crawford's division re-oriented, and it was these troops that swung in far behind Pickett's line to take the last Rebel resistance in the rear, and cut off the northward retreat of many of the Confederates. Ironically, Crawford's error in continuing northward had ultimately made the Federal victory greater than it probably would have been, by scooping up large numbers of prisoners and forcing the remnants of Pickett's force to the west, away from the rest of Lee's army. Sheridan did not see it that way. All he knew was that V Corps had not attacked when he wanted them to, where he wanted them to, and when he had tried to find the V Corps commander to prod him into action, Warren was not to be found. It was this combination of circumstances that led Sheridan to exercise the authority given to him by Grant. Warren was relieved of his command and Griffin took over V Corps. Horace Porter carried the news of Sheridan's success to Grant's headquarters, arriving at around 9 p.m. After listening to Porter's report, Grant walked into his tent, wrote out some orders and came back out, handing the paper copies to an orderly to be taken to the field telegraph. "I have ordered an immediate assault along the lines," he announced. An incredible record.
(Est. $12,000-18,000)
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499. Two letters to future President Chester Arthur. PORTER, Horace. (1837-1921) Union brevet brigadier general and aide to U.S. Grant. Two letters to future President Chester A. Arthur! The first, a fine association A.L.S. on Pullman's Palace Car Co. letterhead, NY, September 11, 1876 to Arthur, then enriching himself as Customs Collector for New York. In part: "What do you say about wandering down to the Branch with me? If too gloomy today for the sea shore, come tomorrow. I go at 3 1/2 daily..." Usual folds, else fine. Together with another ALS, this on Executive Mansion letterhead, in purple, one vertical fold into text, written as one of U.S. Grant's military secretaries (who "managed to keep his nose clean during all that administration's scandals"). This letter of introduction requests Arthur to intervene at the landing of a ship to expedite friends managing their way through customs. ("Favors" like this made Arthur wealthy!) A nice pair. (Est. $150-200)
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500. PORTER, David D. (1813-91) Union admiral instrumental at the siege of Vicksburg. A.L.S. 2p., Annapolis, Nov. 15, 1866 to Rear Admiral Henry K. Thatcher (d. 1880) introducing and recommending "Chaplain H B. Hilber[?]". Usual folds, fine. (Est. $100-200)
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501. ROSECRANS, William S. (1819-98) Union major general who headed the Army of the Cumberland to gain a hard-won victory at Murfreesboro, only to be routed by Longstreet at Chickamauga. Post-war signature and inscription on the verso of a cabinet card bearing a sepia bust portrait of Rosecrans. The inscription on the verso reads: "To Comrade J. C. Stevenson New Castle Pa. from W. S. Rosecrans Bvt. Maj. Genl. U.S.A." Bears a Rice, Washington, D.C. imprint at bottom. Mounting remnants at top margin on verso, otherwise very good. (Est. $300-400)
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502. SAXTON, Rufus. (1824-1908) Union brigadier general who won a Medal of Honor for his defense of Harper's Ferry, also instrumental in the enlistment and organization of blacks into the federal army. A great Andersonville-related A.L.S. "R. Saxton" with rank on Quartermaster's Department letterhead, 4p\ p. 7 3/4 x 10 1/4", Fort Leavenworth, Aug. 28, 1876 to Attorney General Alphonso Taft. In part: "with regard to the claim of B.B. Dykes for the use and occupation of certain real estate at Andersonville, Ga...I had general charge of the Andersonville Cemetery. I had during this time several interviews with Dykes with regard to the land...there was no such use made of his property, as he claims in the account...he offered to deed the whole tract to the government for three thousand dollars. If he had charged for every stick of timber used by the Confederate government to build the prison pen where thousands of our soldiers died it could have then accounted only to a small percentage of this exorbitant claim...". An interesting Andersonville claim, also endorsed by Montgomery MEIGS (1816-92). Slight stain to Saxton's signature, else near fine. (Est. $250-350)
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Sherman sends a terse rare war-dated letter to future Gen. John Starkweather... just five days after being superseded in the Dept. of the Ohio by Buell, under a cloud of insanity.

503. SHERMAN, William Tecumseh. (1820-91) Union Major General declared by the press to be "insane," he led his army in their March to the Sea, taking Atlanta, Savannah and Columbia along the way. ALS, November 14, 1861, in full: "Col. John C. Starkweather Sir, I authorize you to recruit your regiment up to the standard provided you enlist only persons who have already served and that they shall come embodied in not less than fifty men. W. T. Sherman Brig. Gen. Comd." The new Department of the Ohio, which replaced those of Ohio and the Cumberland, consisted of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and Tennessee, and Kentucky east of the Cumberland River. Command was given to Brig. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, who superseded Sherman. The job had proved too great a nervous strain for Sherman, who departed under a cloud with even his sanity questioned. Buell was thought to be a stalwart, firm and able soldier. (Est. $2,800-3,500)
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504. SHERMAN, William T. A.L.S. "W.T. Sherman", 2p., 5 x 8", St. Louis, May 30, 1867 to Dr. Linton writing in part: "I enclose you a check for the $120.00 advanced to the Duncan Expedition. I will have Scott collect it of Duncan in New York and apply it to the bill for the Goods ordered in Paris... All I wait for is an order from Miss Linton, or whoever ordered her 'things' in Paris... I would like to have this before 12:00 o'clock today..." Two discreet repairs to weak folds on verso, else fine. With original transmittal envelope in his hand. (Est. $300-500)
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Interesting war-date Jeb Stuart ALS
"I have but one motive...
and that is duty to our Country."
A significant, pristine rarity.


505. STUART, James E.B. (1833-64) Confederate Major General of cavalry, led a daring reconnaissance on McClellan's forces, riding around the entire army. Later turned up late at Gettysburg leaving Lee "blind." He proved himself a premier intelligence officer, and was considered "the eyes of the CSA." He fought gallantly at First Manassas, Seven Pines, Second Manassas, Fredericksburg and Brandy Station. Questions were raised due to his being delayed at Gettysburg, but he again distinguished himself at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania. His death at Yellow Tavern was a blow to the Southern cause. Rare war-date Autograph Letter Signed "J.E.B. Stuart" as major general, two pages, 5" x 8", March 2, 1863, Headquarters, Cavalry Division, Army of North Virginia, with the blank integral leaf attached. "Your favor of July 24th was duly received and I have given its subject prompt attention, but no record can be found of any such case having been submitted here. It must have miscarried. My Division surgeon to whom I showed your letter says he will make inquiry about your son and if worthy will have him detailed for hospital duty at the Coleman Institute in Hanover, where his opportunities for study will be better & his expenses less than at Richmond. In the abstract I am opposed to such details but there are special cases which justify it. I have but one motive in these matters and that is duty to our Country, which I know you will recognize as paramount to everything else..." Written shortly before succeeding Jackson as 2nd Corps commander at Chancellorsville and months before he was defeated and mortally wounded at Spotsylvania Courthouse. A desirable letter from Stuart in pristine condition. (Est. $12,000-15,000)
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War-dated Confederate document signed by four leading generals
and written to Jeb Stuart.


506. [STUART, Jeb.] Signatures of General John H. WINDER, General Wade HAMPTON, General P. M. B. YOUNG and General R. H. CHILTON, four war-dated endorsements on the verso of a one-page ALS by General John H. Winder addressed to Major Genl. J.E.B. Stuart, headed Richmond, Virginia: "Gen'l Stuart - J. T. Higden, Private in Cobb's Legion was sent to prison in this place, subject to your order. He is now sick in Prison Hospital and the Agent of the State of South Carolina applies for his transfer to South Carolina hospital. Not knowing whether there are charges against him I refer the application to you. Jno. H. Winder, Brig. Gen'l". Also endorsed twice by Stuart's Adj. Genl, Maj. H. B. McClellan, stating that "Private Higden was sent to Charlottesville Hospital, wounded June 9, 1863. He is a deserter from Orr's Rifle Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers and joined Captain Eves Company of Cobb's Legion while in Richmond Hospital last winter requested that he be arrested and returned to his original command for punishment." A great piece with historic association. (Est. $2,500-3,000)
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A Confederate secret agent -
just before resigning his cabinet office!

507. THOMPSON, Jacob. (1810-85) Democratic Congressman 1839-51, Sec. of the Interior 1857-61, returned to Mississippi after secession to serve in the Confederate Army until the fall of Vicksburg. He then went to Canada, fomenting trouble as a secret Confederate agent. At the close of the war, he fled to Europe. After a short exile, he returned to settle in Memphis. L.S. "J. Thompson," from the Dept. of the Interior, January 18, 1859. Written to Samuel Huntington, Chief Clerk to the Court of Claims, requesting further information in the case of Charles Wilson versus the U.S. A fine example. (Est. $300-400)
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508. WINDER, John H. (1800-65) Confederate brigadier general and commander of the Confederate Libby Prison, Belle Isle and the notorious prison at Andersonville. He escaped the hangman, dying just before war's end. War-date A.D.S., [Richmond], Mar. 29, 1862, in full: "Please have a passport for Capt. R. S. Cox Qr. Master Dept to Hanover County for 60 days Jno. H. Winder Brig Genl". Small tear at top corner affects nothing, very good. (Est. $300-350)
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The hero of Little Round Top...
signed just one month earlier.

509. WOODWARD, Orpheus. (1835-1919) Union brevet brigadier general who commanded a company at Little Round Top (Gettysburg). Lost a leg from wounds inflicted at the Wilderness. Partly-printed D.S., 8 x 4", "In the Field", May 31, 1863, a receipt for office supplies including paper, tape and envelopes. Trimmed at top, else fine. (Est. $200-300)
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510. ZOOK, Samuel. (1823-63) Union brigadier general who commanded a regiment on the Peninsula, mortally wounded leading his men at Gettysburg. Rare war date D.S. "S. K. Zook Col. 57th NY Cmdg. Brigade", 2p. 32 x 21", a "Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Henry, Company F...from the day of Enlistment, 1862...to the Thirty first day of December, 1862", listing about 100 members of the regiment by name with each entry signed by the soldier, also signed by Captain Henry, 1st Lt. John D. Stokes, Paymaster Sam J. Bell, Jr., and Col. Richard P. Roberts. The 140th Pa. was a Gettysburg unit which lost over half its number at the Wheatfield on July 2nd, also serving with great distinction at Chancellorsville and in the Wilderness. Undoubtedly, many of the men who signed this document, in addition to Zook, never left Gettysburg alive. Professionally mended at toned folds, one of which passes through signature, else entirely legible with no paper loss and very good. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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