BLACK AMERICANA

[A reminder of what the War -in part- was fought for: important, and vital African-American history. The first African slaves in America were sold in Jamestown in August 1619, a year before the Pilgrims arrived. Slavery quickly spread throughout Virginia, gained legal recognition, and became the assumed status for all Blacks. Elaborate codes were established to maintain slavery - including laws about marriage, ownership and parenthood. By the time of the Revolution, there were a half-million slaves in America and although some Southerners (such as Jefferson) spoke out against the institution, it was firmly entrenched in the economy. In the early 1800s, Northern abolition groups began to form and in 1817, the American Colonization Society was founded with the intent to send freedmen back to Africa. A few slave revolts, most notably Nat Turner's in 1831, virtually eliminated all opposition to slavery in the South. Attitudes towards slavery in the North and South hardened in the decades before the Civil War, despite the Missouri Compromise, the Compromise of 1850, and Kansas-Nebraska Act. "Bleeding Kansas" and John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry showed the violence people would employ over the practice. On January 1, 1863, Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, outlawing slavery in areas under rebellion and in December 1865, the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment officially ended slavery in America.]

Abolition meeting broadside - An important piece of American history.

809. A most rare and visually compelling broadside, 10.5 x 16", Homestead Print, Salem, Ohio, [1850], printed by the Western Anti-Slavery Society of Salem, Ohio. A printed broadside intended to be filled out for a specific event, it reads: "Union with Freemen--No Union with Slaveholders. ANTI-SLAVERY MEETINGS! Anti-Slavery Meetings will be held in this place, to commence on... at... in the.... To be Addressed by Agents of the Western ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY. Three millions of your fellow beings are in chains -- the Church and Government sustains the horrible system of oppression. Turn Out! AND LEARN YOUR DUTY TO YOURSELVES, THE SLAVE AND GOD. EMANCIPATION or DISSOLUTION, and a FREE-NORTHERN REPUBLIC!" The Western Anti-Slavery Society was headquartered in Salem, Ohio and was one of the more radical abolitionist groups, active on the Underground Railroad and the publisher of the Anti-Slavery Bugle. The group hosted numerous meetings featuring such speakers as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass. Only two other copies have been located to date, both in institutions. One copy resides in the collections of the Library of Congress (Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 137, Folder 4), and the other is at Yale University. OCLC# 59557224. Tiny hole at near right, a couple of minuscule marginal tears, not affecting text, otherwise extremely fine condition. (Est. $1,800-2,200)
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810. Slave Shackles. A pair or iron shackles bound together with three links, overall 16" in length, used for restraining slaves. Shackles like these were often the tools of the trade for slave dealers and auctioneers to restrain their "property" during transport. Includes original key which fits into the cylinder on each side. The centers of the iron links have been further reinforced with bands of sheet metal to prevent prying. Minimal corrosion, wear. A most poignant relic of one of the most shameful periods in our nation's history. (Est. $500-700)
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Signed by both Father and Son!


811. BROWN, John. (1800-59) One of the most defining figures in American history, Brown's activities - culminating in the raid on Harper's Ferry - have been debated as either the butchery of a madman or the zealous labors of a passionate abolitionist. While credited/blamed for being one of the dominoes that tumbled to start the War, few remember that his capture was orchestrated by Col. Robert E. Lee.
An impressive association piece, Brown's signature with sentiment "your Affectionate Father John Brown" on a 3 1/2 x 3 1/2" slip removed from an 1851 letter to his son, John Jr. Below his closing John BROWN, Jr. (1821-95) has added a note: "Autograph of John Brown from letter addressed to John Brown Jr. March 24th 1851 J.B. Jr." The slip has been affixed to the front blank flyleaf of Stephen Vincent Benet's John Brown's Body. (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Doran and Company, Inc., 1928) 377pp, 6 x 8 1/2", cloth boards. Slip has been closely cut at top marginally affecting top of Brown's sentiment, light show-through from glue, usual folds, else very good. Book bears very minimal wear to board edges, clean pages, overall fine. Like his other brothers, John Jr., though supportive of his father's anti-slavery activities, refused to take part in the Harper's Ferry Raid. Following his father's execution, John Jr., worked tirelessly to defend his father's character against public criticism.
(Est. $1,500-2,000)
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812. "John Brown's Grave, North Elba, Essex Co., N.Y." An extrordinary stereoview by Anthony, his printed label on verso, exceptional clarity and detail. An excellent, period photograph commemorating the fallen zealot. (Est. $100-300)
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813. Early mounted photograph, 6 1/2 x 5" overall, being the marker at the tomb of John Brown, buried together with his son Oliver who was killed at Harper's Ferry. Two light abrasions to edges of board, overall excellent. (Est. $60-80)
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"Old Hickory's" son buys slaves!


814. JACKSON, Andrew Jr. Fragment of a manuscript Document Signed "Andrew Jackson, Junr.", 2pp., 8 x 6", [n.p.], September 28, 1836, a bill of sale for the purchase of forty-four slaves purchased of "William A. Eliason of the city of Washington. To have and to hold all my right, title, claim and interest in said lot of Negroes consisting at the time of purchase of forty-four slaves for life. If there are any deaths or depreciation in the value of forty-four slaves, I will reduce the amount of his notes to me precisely in the same amount my notes to Capt. Eliason are reduced..." Boldly signed by Jackson on the verso and countersigned by A. J. Donelson, a relative on Rachel Jackson's side of the family. During Jackson's tenure as President, his son managed the Hermitage and these slaves were likely destined for that plantation. Jackson had just visited Hermitage that summer, his first visit since the estate had been badly damaged by fire; and Donelson, Jackson's ward who worked in the White House, had stayed behind in Tennessee with his wife who was dying. Jackson returned to the Hermitage in March of the next year following Van Buren's inauguration. Heavily chipped with losses at margins, weak folds repaired, else good. Examples of President's Jackson's namesake are prohibitively rare... this is an interesting specimen. (Est. $500-750)
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Born in Hawaii, the commander of Black troops during the Civil War - and founder of Hampton Institute - writes about sending a Minister to the Islands.

815. ARMSTRONG, Samuel Chapman. (1839-1893) Civil War volunteer commissioned colonel of Ninth Regiment, distinguished as Union Commander of an all Black Regiment. At end of War, received brevet rank of brigadier general. Given his visible and widely-acclaimed successes commanding African American soldiers, Armstrong received an appointment as an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau placed in charge of emancipated slaves near Hampton, VA. Recognizing a need to provide a practical education for Blacks requiring industrial and technical skills, Armstrong founded the Hampton Normal and Industrial Institute in 1868. Autograph Letter Signed "S.C. Armstrong" on "The Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute" stationery, Hampton, VA, May 14, 1889. Armstrong sends his friend, Mr. Ward, Editor of the Independent, an article on the Hawaiian Islands, noting "The matter of a good American Minister at these Islands is of great importance(?) and you can help it by calling attention to it." A scarce and excellent holographic specimen. (Est. $300-400)
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816. The Fugitive Slave Act & The Missouri Compromise. A set of three manuscript letters, 9p. total, 8 x 10", Reading, Penn., August, 20, August 25, and October 4, 1856 (one letter partial), mostly concerning contemporary politics. In small part: "...Now what did Fillmore do when acting president by the will of God - that he should receive bitter curses... upon his silvery head by the northern Republican Disunionists? Why he signed that Fugitive Slave Act. Supposing he had not signed that act. What would have been our condition as a people now! Would we have been the prosperous & growing people we really are. No... I love Mr. Fillmore not because he is a friend to the north nor the south, but because he is a friend to our whole country..." More fine content. Slight discoloration at folds with minor partial separations, else fine. (Est. $200-300)
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817. A Slave Habitually Runs Away. A wonderful Civil War date Southern Planter's letter, 1p. 5 x 8", Cool Springs, N.C., March 21, 1865 to Dr. J. McGuire concerning his chronic runaway slave named Jone. He writes in part: "...I have sent you several verbal messages that Jone was at my place frequently... you could get him almost anytime. I have sent him away several times, but he is still here. He seems to be an independent character going about whenever & wherever he pleases. I should have made him done something but I did not wish to employ him without your consent. I... expect you to send for him & will not send him away for a few days as you can get him here without any trouble. He says he has been in the woods a part of his time..." The casualness of the planters is likely a testament to the fact that Jone would be a free man quite shortly. Very good condition.
(Est. $200-400)
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On Rebel gunboats, spurious news on Grant's demise, and frank views on serving with African Americans: "...Vicksburg is taken...Grant is killed...
A Nigger in the Navy is treated
better than a white man."

818. Civil War soldier William H. Mabury's letter, June 1, 1863, 4p., in which the Union fighter speaks his mind about the slaves he is fighting to liberate: "News we got here is that Vicksburg is taken and Gen. Grant is killed. They ought to send every black devil in the North and every contraband that has come on this side...to the war and make a brest work of them. A Nigger in the Navy is treated better than a white man...The white man has to go and fight for them. I don't want to hear any body preach about the poor slave any more..." Nice full-color patriotic letterhead, pristine presentation. Remarkable content regarding Blacks in the Navy - discourse very rarely seen. (Est. $350-400)
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1863 Civil War letter on training
Black soldiers: "we shall begin to prosper just as soon as we are humble enough to accept help from the negro..."


819. Six page missive by Charles Hill, 5th MA Vol. Inf., February 18, 1863, to his wife from Camp Newbern, NC. In part: "Those who have seen them say that they drill very well. I have full confidence in the ability of the negro, as he is seen here at least, to make soldiers. And I believe that we shall begin to prosper just as soon as we are humble enough to accept help from the negro, and not before...The blacks are hungering after knowledge. I hope some means will be devised by which they will be educated. It must be done. I should love to undertake it [Hill had been a teacher in New England before joining the army.] It is a private school. There were sixteen present today...it is taught in one room of a private house, very much such a room as you acquired your teaching experience in...The teacher, a North Carolina lady, appeared somewhat embarrassed, but talked quite intelligently. She said she used to teach before the place was taken. The scholars [students] were from about six to twelve years of age...I do not know whether study was a part of the programme or not. I did not see any while I was in. I only heard spelling classes, so could not judge of scholarship...The teacher was very mild in her discipline. And the scholars seemed to have a good time generally." With original cover, excellent condition... fabulous insight and content! (Est. $300-500)
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820. Slavery in Pennsylvania. A curious pamphlet concerning a most curious event in the history of slavery in Pennsylvania. Report of the Committee Appointed in the Senate of Pennsylvania, to investigate the cause of an Increased number of Slaves being returned for that Commonwealth, by the Census of 1830, over that of 1820... (Harrisburg: Printed by Henry Welsh, 1833), 7pp., 5 1/4" x 9, titled wraps. Pennsylvania was in the process of gradual emancipation, granting freedom to the children of slaves born after March, 1780. The slave population in the state, already small, quickly dwindled: 795 in 1810, and 211 in 1820. Surprisingly however, the population in the 1830 census nearly doubled to about 400! The state senate committee soon discovered that the population had not actually increased at all and blamed the anomaly upon "two marshals, by their injudicious instructions to their deputies, directed them to enter as slaves, all coloured [sic] people of both sexes, who were held to service for limited periods. These deputies... retuned as slaves, even children under ten years of age, who could legally be held to service beyond 21..." Disbound, marginal chipping and toning, else very good condition. The census of 1840 confirmed the anomaly as only 64 persons were counted as slaves in the entire state. (Est. $150-250)
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Counting each New York slave
as "Three-fifths" a person -
a tabulation to determine New York's representation in Congress.


821. A significant historical record... the "cross-roads" of early political organization in our country and the involvement of African Americans as subjects to be tallied. This is the census report for New York with details on the number of "Free Persons" as well as slaves for each county. Printed document, one page, 8 x 13", circa 1801-02, New York City, being A Statement "Shewing the Aggregate Number of Persons in each of the Wards of the City of New-York, in each of the Counties in this State, including, however, no more than three-fifths of the whole number of Slaves." Followed by a detailed account of each of the Wards and Counties with a record of "Free Persons", the number indicating "Three-fifths of Slaves" and the "Aggregate" amounts. The population recorded is 578,349 persons which includes a total 12,362 as three-fifths of the slaves. Light to moderate dampstains in the left margin, otherwise fine. An important testimony. (Est. $2,500-3,500)
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822. Botetourt County, Virginia tax assessment for slaves and other property. Partly-printed D.S. 1p. 6 1/2 x 4", Botetourt County, [Virginia], 1821, a receipt for $14.11 for taxes paid by John Allen which included "1 White Tithes... 7 Black Ditto...7 Slaves... 9 Horses" together with 442 acres of land. A few minor marginal chips and tears, light toning and creases, else very good. (Est. $100-200)
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823. Three exquisite
New Orleans slave documents. Partially printed New Orleans documents, 1832-3, each approx. 6 1/2 x 3 1/4", two in English and the third in French. They are from the City Treasury. One reads, "Received of Mr. John Vigneau the sum of one dollar for the Tax of 1833 on the property and slaves mentioned on the other side, agrreable to the ordinances of the City Council." Interesting content that would display nicely. (Est. $600-800)
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824. (BLACK AMERICANA) Ohio court case involving a man assaulted by a mob for impregnating a Black woman. Fine content collection of manuscript court documents, 15p., 1822-1823, Jefferson County, OH for a case involving John Hutchinson who in 1820 "...Got a negro woman with Child..." This didn't go well with members of the community according to one witness in a deposition: "...a set of said Hutchinson's Country men followed him to Give him a beating for having to do with a negro woman..." Hutchinson then fled abandoning the woman and his child. In this case, Hutchinson is suing James McCurdy for spreading libelous statements about Hutchinson's past. A series of depositions attests to the veracity of McCurdy's statements. According to one deponent asked about "...The said John Hutchison nocking [sic] up a black or Negro woman", the witness stated "...That Said Hutchison had got a Black Woman with child and that George Ashbridge [the slave's owner] kept one hundred dollars of the said Hutchison's money for the sake of the child..." According to another, "...Hutchison told me while he lived at Geo. Ashbridges that a woman came to him and that he could not get shut of her till he had to do with her and that she proved with child ....The said woman had a husband at the same time but he had 'Listed and had gone to the Army... I was [also] informed by Alexander Hutchison that said Hutchison was charged with getting a black woman with child while he... Lived at George Ashbridges... Ashbridge detained upwards of one hundred dollars of said Hutchison's money on account of the black woman being with child to him..." Another deponent asserts that "a set of said Hutchison's countrymen followed him to give him a beating for having to do with a Negro woman, and said Hutchison left them parts on account of the same..." A fascinating group of documents worthy of further research. Usual folds, partial fold separations, light chips, else very good. (Est. $300-500)
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825. Speech of Mr. Badger, of North Carolina, on the Slavery Question. In Senate, March 18 and 19, 1850. ([Washington]: Gideon & Co., Printers, 1850), 18p., 5 3/4 x 8 3/4", disbound. Light foxing, left margin a bit rough, else very good. An important "Compromise" address from a Southern Senator setting forth a platform that would divide the nation in the next decade. A scarce issue. (Est. $40-80)


826. Two Senate Speeches of Henry Wilson. An excellent pair of printed speeches by abolitionist Senator and future Vice President Henry Wilson of Massachusetts. Includes: Aggressions of the Slave Power, a speech delivered January 26, 1860 "In Reply to Hon. Jefferson Davis" (Washington: Buell & Blanchard, [1860]), 8p., 8vo., titled wraps, fine. Together with Speech of Hon. Henry Wilson. of Mass., In the Senate, March 27, 1862, On the Bill to Abolish Slavery in the District of Columbian, Introduced by him... (Washington: Scammel & Co., 1862), 8p., 8vo. titled wraps, light foxing else very good. Two pieces, great content. (Est. $60-80)
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827. Early Abolition Appeal - A Rare Document. A printed circular letter signed in type by radical abolitionist George Washington F. Mellen, 8 x 10", Boston, December 28, 1841 advertising his recently published work, An Argument on the Unconstitutionality of Slavery. Mellen summarizes the work which includes "extracts from the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States respecting the extent of their jurisdiction, and of the rights of individuals under the Constitution; and thinking, at the present time, every one may be desirous of knowing how far the power of the Courts and of Congress and of the States extend when the rights of individuals, whether white or black, are concerned... I have devoted a considerable time and labor on the work, to make it conform to the truth on these subjects, and have tried to make it as interesting as the nature of the subject would allow..." Mellen was considered a radical by fellow abolitionists, and somewhat an embarrassment. A namesake of George Washington, Mellen apparently thought he was Washington, often appearing in public in the military uniform of the Revolution! Usual folds, else fine condition. (Est. $200-300)
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An absolute materpiece!


828. Anti-slavery molded green clay jug. This neat item was produced in England shortly after the publication of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin. The high relief scenes molded onto the body are inspired by that work. One side depicts a slave auction. A sign on the auctioneer's podium states "By Auction this day. A Prime Lot of healthy NEGROES." Three men bid on an adult male (standing barefoot on a bench), an adolescent boy holding his hands to his face, and a mother with a baby in her arms (likewise crying). The back side shows a woman clasping a small child running across the ice floes with a whip-wielding overseer in hot pursuit. The handle is formed by a male slave with hands clasped in prayer. The base is marked "Published by E. Ridgway & Abington Hanley January 1, 1853." Measures 6" from base to tip of handle and is in perfect condition. The interior has a shiny glaze while the exterior is either unglazed or has a matte finish. Quite evocative of the period with folk art qualities to the sculpted images. Likely produced for export to America. (Est. $750-1,000)
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829. An excellent stereoview by Brady, part of the E. & H. T. Anthony "War Views" series. Blue label on verso identifies the image as "colored convalescent Soldiers resting after a march, at Aiken's landing, James river, Va." Light foxing, else fine. (Est. $100-300)
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830. Another in the series, this picturing the "Slave Pen, Alexandria, Va." Even at the time of the war, documenting the principle cause was of paramount interest to photographers such as Anthony.
(Est. $100-300)
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Rare Sojourner Truth carte with slogan and Michigan imprint.

831. This unusual 1864-dated carte has a totally different portrait from the more-often seen: "I Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance, SOJOURNER TRUTH." Fine condition, with one trivial spot on forehead. Overall a great example of this prohibitively scarce image.
Born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree (after her father's owner) in New York, she had already run away from the chains of slavery when it was officially abolished in the state in 1827. Around 1840 she became a traveling preacher, and adopted the name Sojourner Truth in recognition of that calling and, as she asserted, following the instructions of the Holy Spirit. In the late 1840s, she became involved in the organized abolition movement, and in 1851 presented her most famous speech, "Ain't I a Woman?", to an Ohio womens' rights convention. She quickly became a well-known advocate of suffrage, and became acquainted with Harriet Beecher Stowe, who wrote about her in the Atlantic Monthly. During the Civil War she actively raised supplies and funds for Black regiments, and met Lincoln at the White House in 1864. Sojourner remained active in public life, particularly on the lecture circuit, until 1875, when she returned to her adopted home in Michigan, passing away there quietly in 1883.
Few early American social movement figures command as much interest as Sojourner Truth, and this rare photo presents an exceptional opportunity. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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832. Another historic CDV subject: a bold, fine carte photograph of the great Frederick Douglass. On titled board, very minor age at left edge of mount, great contrast and tone. (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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833. An extremely rare and significant portrait: a Civil War Black corporal from New Orleans. Black officers of this period were few - very little in period photography remains to document their valor. This is a profound carte, excellent condition, just a little dark, bright green rule surrounds the mount. Great. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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834. Another signicant African American portrait, this being Private Nelson J. Campbell of the Sixth U.S. Colored Cavalry. His company saw intense action throughout the war. Here he poses with his sword in full uniform. Light even age detracts little. (Est. $800-1,000)
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835. Fannie Virginia Casseopia Lawrence. Another of the "redeemed slave children." 1863 C.S. Lawrence copyright, Black of Boston imprint on verso. Frankly put, they found as "White" a "slave" as possible for these propaganda photos. An excellent example. (Est. $150-200)
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836. Rebecca, one of the "redeemed slave children." This carte by Chas. Paxson was issued in 1863 and sold to raise funds for the education of "Colored People" in the Department of the Gulf. Excellent condition and one of the best examples from this series. (Est. $150-200)
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837. "Dinah Hanging Out Clothes." Carte by F.P. Whiting of New York City. Scratched into the negative at right is a title "Drying the clothes." We suspect a simple portrait documenting the day in the life of a domestic in the big city! Unusual, quite fine. (Est. $75-100)
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838. An unusual item documenting the "sensibility" of 19th century attractions... two young "natives" in costume, posed while on break from their "exhibition." No doubt part of a tribal presentation of peoples from around the world. Sad on every level...even their expressions seem forlorn.
(Est. $200-250)
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839. Talk about "going native!" A tremendous carte by Esenmann, famous for photography of sideshow personalities and those who became public attractions in various shows. This shows a Black clad in furs holding his "primitive" weaponry and tools. We suspect he was put on display (exploited) as some primitive (African "wild man") from a far off land. Scarce. (Est. $150-250)
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840. "Murderer." 1870 carte by J.S. Howard, presenting
"Charles H. Hall, The Youthful Murderer of Mr. Benjamin Howard, Westport, Mass." An extrordinary portrait. (Note: A complete history of this sad case will accompany the lot.) (Est. $75-100)
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841. An interesting carte portrait of a Black gentleman looking extremely dapper, hat in hand. One light spot in field, mount slightly trimmed, a fine 19th century portrait. (Est. $75-100)
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842. Three cartoon cartes with various themes. That entitled "South" shows a Black minstrel celebrating with a copy of the Emancipation Proclamation in one hand, a banjo in the other. The CDV entitled "The 'Colored Volunteer'" is by Thomas Nast, 1863, and considered a classic image of the period. (Est. $150-200)
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843. A most spectacular sixth plate tintype of an armed Black union solider, seated holding his rifle in one hand. A sharp and crisp photo housed in an ornate gutta-percha case with a floral motif and red velvet lining. A few minor bends do little to detract from this arresting photograph. A few nicks to case, and hinge loose, otherwise very good. This is truly a magnificent document of the period - African American portraits of this magnitude are quite scarce. (Est. $3,000-4,000)
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844. This one is extremely special! A most rare image of a African American Union sailor in uniform, a ninth plate tintype housed in a gutta-percha case with brass matting and red velvet lining. Image slightly discolored, but does not obscure this rare portrait. Case rubbed at sides, overall very good. Period photographs of Black sailors are quite prohibitive; this is a nice example. (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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845. A wonderful 1/4 plate ambrotype of four men, two seated, including one Black man who is holding a bottle of liquor and a glass. An unusual piece with light rouge tinting to cheeks. The subjects are quite relaxed in this pose, quite unusual for formal studio poses of the period. Perhaps the libations pictured proved a factor here. One crack at upper left, but overall still a very clean and distinct image. Housed in an ornate brass mat that has been placed into a 14 x 15" frame for presentation. A great display piece! (Est. $500-750)
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846. An arresting sixth-plate ruby ambrotype of a free Black man, c. 1865-70 in brass mat set in half gutta-percha case. Subtly tinted on one cheek and his tie pin has been highlighted. Wear at edges, else crisp distinct. (Est. $500-750)
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847. A wonderful sixth-plate ambrotype of a well-dressed African American woman holding her hand-kercheif. Light red tinting to her cheeks, an early portrait of a Black woman who clearly enjoyed a place of standing. (Est. $600-800)
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848. Black Civil War soldier wearing his shell-jacket! Sixth-plate tintype of a Black man wearing his shell jacket donning a broad-brimmed hat. Housed in a good gutta-percha case with red silk lining and a fine brass mat. Minor pitting to surface of tintype does not detract from image. (Est. $500-750)
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849. Sixth-plate tintype of a seated Black woman wearing a hand-tinted green dress with a pink bow with gilt accents to rings and necklace. Somewhat dark with some dents from previous oval mat. Housed in an ornate brass mat and plain half case. (Est. $150-250)
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850. Sixth-plate ambrotype of a Black woman in a white dress, with gilt accents to her earrings, necklace and rings. Solarization at margins only compromises image somewhat and the woman is still quite visible and distinct. Velvet lining rubbed, some dents to brass mat and gutta-percha case. Hinge reinforced with tape. (Est. $300-500)
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851. With a presentation inscription to express passion and love! An oval sixth-plate tintype of a Black woman housed in an ornate oval thermoplastic case with simple brass mating. Behind the portrait is penned a period love note! A few minor bends to photo only slightly affect image, tiny chips to edge of case. Overall, a fine, early portrait. (Est. $300-500)
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852. Huge! A wonderful pair of (2) full-plate tintypes, each entirely hand colored in black, brown, gold, red, blue and white, of two middle class black women, circa 1865-75. One woman is quite elaborately adorned with several rings, gold earrings and a necklace and a brooch with well coiffed hair. Her image is just as elaborately framed in gilt molding and mat, 15 x 16 1/2". The other woman is distinctly plainer, but still well-dressed with a gold ring and neck clasp. Her photo is housed in an equally simple gilt frame, 8 1/2 x 11". A set of very unusual images. Both appear to be in fine condition, not examined out of frame. (Est. $1,400-1,800)
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853. A sharp, mounted oval albumen of a middle-aged Black woman and her child in what appears to be a christening dress. 5 x 7" (11 x 13 1/2" framed overall). Housed in an oval frame. Some wear and chipping to frame, albumen bears some very minor foxing, else quite fine. (Est. $600-800)
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854. 54th Mass. at Fort Wagner. Mounted albumen 8 1/4 x 5 1/2", bearing mounted title: "No. 33. Bomb-Proof -- Fort Wagner." at bottom center. Several Black soldiers in the 54th Massachusetts can be seen in the extreme foreground inspecting the ruins of the recently captured fort. A later photograph taken from the original negative. Edge wear to mount, else a very good photograph.
(Est. $200-300)
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A very disturbing photograph...
a sad chapter in American history.

855. On a titled board, some chips/loss as shown, "Harris and James Gillespie hanged to a tree June 11, 1902, at 2 a.m., by a mob of more than three hundred, for the cruel murder of Miss Cordelia Benson, of Rowan County, N.C., June 9th." Cabinet card by Excelsior Studio of Salisbury, North Carolina. A violent depiction of mob rule and the resulting lynching.
(Est. $600-800)
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856. A series of three (3) mounted photographs, 6 x 5 1/2" overall, one with speckled stains, documenting preparation for the simultaneous hanging of two Black men. One shows the hooded men awaiting the noose. We have no knowledge of the circumstances... appears to be late 19th century. (Est. $200-300)
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857. Two ninth-plate tintypes, each presenting well-dressed Blacks in studio portraits. The proud child is adorned with his watch-fob chain; the gentleman leaning on a chair is quite impressive with a walking stick in his right hand! (Est. $75-100)
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858. Two cabinet cards. A horizontal portrait of the Scafolo Normal Industrial School in South Carolina, excellent detail, slight bumps to top of board; together with the class of 1897 posed together at the Junior Normal School, slightly light with age discoloration at bottom of mount. (Est. $60-80)
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859. A fine pair: a carte photo on a peach-colored board of the Jubilee Singers, excellent; and a cabinet card of the University Singers of New Orleans, "In Aid of Colored Orphans' Home." Light fly-specks, mounting remnants on verso, by Sawyer of Philadelphia. (Est. $75-100)
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860. Dutiful employees of the Overland Union Railroad System. A great, 1916 (we enlarged the heck out of the photograph to read the year on the calendar nailed on the wall to the right of the clock!) mounted photograph, 8 1/2 x 7" overall, with a Black train conductor posed holding his watch open. A fun, occupational study from early in the last century. (Est. $60-80)
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861. A very rare portrait... a Black Mason! A fine mounted albumen of a Black mason standing beside a chair with his hat in hand wearing a Masonic apron. 4 1/4 x 5 1/2". Trimmed at top left and right corners to match arched album mat. Minor tears at bottom do not detract. Offered with a period frame with gilt trim,10 x 11".
(Est. $800-1,000)
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862. Pair of large, early photographs, each 9 1/2 x 7 1/2" on 10 x 12" mounts. The first presents an impressive group of African Americans posed in their fraternal group/lodge (Freemasons? Knights of Templar?) dress uniforms with swords and headgear. A fine study. Together with a similar portrait, these also posed with dress swords, two on left display their drums. Fun photos reflecting Blacks caught up in pomp and circumstance! (Est. $150-250)
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863. Mounted albumen of the 132 politicians who voted for the Amendment to prohibit slavery. Published by Powell & Co.: NY, 1865. Oval 10 x 8.5", mounted to card stock which is heavily soiled with creased corners. The montage photo is nice. It features Lincoln & Hamlin at the top and bottom with Speaker of the House Colfax at center. (Est. $100-300)
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An important print honoring the heroes deed... issued just after signing the Emancipation Proclamation!

864. A rare and wonderful hand-colored lithograph by E. B. & E. C. Kellogg entitled "Abraham Lincoln. Sixteenth President of the United States of America. Immortalized his name by the Proclamation of Emancipation January 1st 1863 whereby more than Three Millions of Human Beings were declared Forever Free." Published by E. P. Whiting, New York. Nicely framed to 17 x 19". A few small tears at bottom margin, else fine condition. A very significant and quite scarce print that was re-issued in a variant later as a mourning item. This is the more difficult to find celebratory piece lauding the signing of the Proclamation.
(Est. $600-800)
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865. [Anti-Slavery Society] A fabulous woodcut... Martin Van Buren pictured on the sidelines! N. Southard, ed., The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for 1838. (Boston: Isaac Knapp, [1837]), 48pp., 5 3/4 x 8", titled wraps, string bound. A rare imprint (only four copies are located in institutional collections). Chipped and creased at margins, not affecting text or illustrations. OCLC 30551852, Checklist American Imprints, 42766. (Est. $100-200)
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866. "Darkey Conscript," a 5 x 8" song sheet by Magnus bearing a hand-colored engraved illustration at top. Reads in small part: "When I was a little moke I used to stay at home, Now I am a big nig to this war I'll roam; Although I am conscript, I feel mighty gay, I'll hold an office next election day..." A few soiled spots, else very fine. (Est. $200-300)
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867. Another hit from Bryant's Minstrels, surely not as huge as "Dixie's Land", but we're sure it was well-received! "Raw Recruits. Or Abraham's Daughter" (New York: Firth, Pond & Co., 1862) featuring a wonderfully hand colored illustration of a group of stereotypical black solders in camp. Reinforced on left margin, small tear at bottom, else very good condition with extremely bright colors. (Est. $200-300)
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868. Music from Uncle Tom's Cabin. A set of two (2) pieces of printed sheet music, 6p. each, 10 x 13 1/2", by Ditson of Boston, 1852, both featuring songs adapted to scenes from Stowe's novel including "Eliza's Flight" and "'I am Going There'. Or the Death of little Eva". Minor loss at left margins from binding, mostly bright. (Est. $100-100)
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869. "The Crow Quadrilles." Sheet music, 8p., by John F. Nunns, Philadelphia, containing such hits as "Jim Crow", "Zip Coon", "Sich a gittin up stairs & Long time ago", "Sittin on a Rail", "Clare de Kitchin", and other all-time favorites. Cover features a range of stereotypical vignettes. Moderate foxing, else very good. (Est. $150-200)
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870. A 4 1/2 x 2 1/2" trade card for the Putnam Nail Company, bearing a finely engraved color illustration with the following advertising doggerel: "Say, Sambo, Ho! Where is your shoe? Those cheap cut nails will never do, 'tis hard to beat a horse well shod, with Putnam Nails forged from the rod." Mounting remnants opposite cartoon side, else very good. (Est. $50-75)
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871. Emancipation Proclamation. Mounted albumen 8 x 9 1/2", bearing the text of the Emancipation Proclamation with a portrait of Lincoln at center and a range of politicians and generals at the margins. With Ames National Business College, Syracuse, N.Y. imprint on verso. A few ink touch ups at margins, else very good.
(Est. $200-300)
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872. Lincoln's visage in script from the Emancipation Proclamation. A wonderful tribute piece using the text of the Emancipation Proclamation to produce a bust likeness of Lincoln. Designed by W. H. Pratt of Davenport, IA and litho by A. Hagenboeck of the same city, 1865. 12 x 15". A few specks away from the litho, else very fine. (Est. $500-700)
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All by the great Thomas Nast.

873. The Federals Liberating the Plantation. A wonderful engraving from Harper's Weekly of Thomas Nast's "ARRIVAL OF A FEDERAL COLUMN AT A PLANTER'S HOUSE IN DIXIE.", April 4, 1863. A wonderful image juxtaposing the reactions of newly-liberated slaves with those of the plantation mistresses standing sullenly on the porch. 21 x 17" overall in acid-free mat. (Est. $100-150)
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874. A stirring pair of illustrations from Harper's: an 1862 centerfold, 21 x 16", "Negroes Driven South by the Rebel Officers." The other, from 1860 (11 x 16"), shows "The Africans of the Slave Bark 'Wildfire." Centerfold bears a few faults at center fold, else very good to fine. (Est. $200-300)
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875. A fine pair of Nast illustrations from Harper's Weekly, 11 x 16" each, one a denunciation of white resistance to Reconstruction entitled "Which is the More Illegal" and the other asking "Is this a Republican form of Government?..." Minor edge chips would mat out easily. (Est. $200-300)
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876. Reconstruction in Harper's. A fine pair: The 'Abraham Lincoln School' For Freemen, New Orleans, Louisiana; and a dramatic rendering by A. R. Waud of a member of the Freedmen's' Bureau standing between mobs of angry Whites and Blacks. Minor edge chips would mat out easily. (Est. $200-300)
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877. Thomas Nast on the Democratic Party. A caustic pair of political cartoons from Harper's, 16 x 11" each, one entitled "Would You Marry your Daughter to a Nigger?" and the other "This is a White Man's Government" showing the unholy trinity of New York capital, former Confederates and the Irish. Light toning to one, minor edge chips would mat out easily. (Est. $200-300)
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878. Nast on Reconstruction. A pair of centerfolds from Harper's, 11 x 16" each, one titled "Our Ulysses" and the other "Declaration of Equality". Minor edge chips would mat out easily. (Est. $200-300)
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879. (Reconstruction.) A dark and foreboding cartoon by Thomas Nast from the March 23, 1867 issue Harper's Weekly, a centerfold, 16 x 22" entitled "Southern Justice" replete with scenes of crooked courtrooms, lynchings, beatings and other atrocities committed against freedmen and those who came south to help them. A couple of minor chips else near fine and quite clean. (Est. $150-250)
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880. Thomas Nast centerfold from Harper's entitled "He Wants A Change Too." This dates from the October 28, 1876 issue and stands as one of the starkest, most dramatic depictions of an African American in the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. Graphic depicts an armed Black preparing to retaliate against the violence perpetrated against his race. A stirring image, bright and clean. (Est. $150-250)
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The only known copy in private hands.


881. An extremely rare First World War recruiting or "uplift" poster entitled "True Sons of Freedom". A wonderfully rich and colorful example depicting a regiment of black soldiers gallantly assaulting a line of Germans with the spirit of Lincoln looking on approvingly. 15 x 20", copyright 1918 by Charles Gustrine of Chicago. More than 350,000 African Americans served in segregated units during World War I, mostly as support troops. Several units saw action alongside French soldiers fighting against the Germans, and 171 African Americans were awarded the French Legion of Honor. In response to protests of discrimination and mistreatment from the black community, several hundred African American men received officers' training in Des Moines, Iowa. By October 1917, over six hundred African Americans were commissioned as captains and first and second lieutenants. Marginal chipping with some minor losses, small tear at top center which lays flat, else quite clean and still fairly vivid coloring. A most impressive example of American First World War propaganda posters. Mounted to archival board and mat. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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