CIVIL WAR BROADSIDES, EPHEMERA, PHILATELY, CURRENCY AND RELICS

A rare piece of Kentucky history!


700. "TO ARMS!! PROTECT YOUR HOME AND FREEDOM." A very rare and early Kentucky broadside imploring the citizens of the sharply divided border state to rally to join the home guard which eventually formed the core of the Kentucky units in the Confederate Army, 12 x 11", [Kentucky], April 18, 1861. Five days following the Confederate bombardment of Fort Sumter, Lincoln's April 15 call for 75,000 volunteers reaches Kentucky: "The President has by PROCLAMATION called for 75,000 men. What these men are called under arms for is no longer in doubt; his purpose is to subjugate the seceded States by force of arms." Clearly alarmed by the prospect, the broadside implores that "Kentucky must arm for her defense against INVASION. Our HOMES must be protected, our families secured. For this purpose we need an active Home Guard, and we call on all able bodied young men who are willing to defend their homes to come forward and enroll themselves in the State Guard..." Signed in print by Thomas H. Hays and Capt. M. H. Cofer who "assure all those who enroll after this day will not be required to remain members of the organization longer than the present emergency may require it. If peace should happily be restored all persons desiring it will be discharged..." Clearly, they were quite optimistic, a prevalent attitude on both sides prior to Bull Run several months later. Officially, Governor Magoffin attempted to remain neutral and opposed Lincoln's call for troops stating "Kentucky will furnish no troops for the wicked purpose of subduing her sister Southern States." True to his neutralist posture, he refused a similar request from Jefferson Davis the next day. Elections in August 1861, boycotted by Southern sympathizers, resulted in a Unionist sweep. As Federal troops moved into Kentucky in the late summer and early fall, the state guard troops became a worry and on September 19 they were ordered to disarm the Kentuckians. That night, Captain John Hunt Morgan moved some guardsmen and their weapons out of Lexington to join the Confederate rendezvous on Green River. Three of the five officers listed here ultimately ended up in the Confederate Army including Martin H. Cofer, Frank D. Moffitt, and Charles H. Thomas. Miller R. McCulloch remained loyal to the Union. Weak folds professionally repaired on verso, light toning, some marginal chipping with minor losses at top. (Est. $6,000-8,000)
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Issued one week prior to the Confederate capture of Lexington! Another important piece of Kentuckiana.


701. An extremely rare and historically significant broadside, 9 x 5", "Head Quarters U. S. Forces, Phoenix Hotel", Lexington, Kentucky, August 24, 1862, issued only a week before Lexington would fall to Confederate forces. It bears an order by Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace as head of the defenses of the Department of the Ohio ordering "1st. 'Secessionists,' Southern Sympathizers, and persons not known to be strictly loyal to the Government of the United States will not be permitted to frequent these Head Quarters. 2d. The like class of persons are forbidden to assemble on the streets of the City or in their houses either in groups or crowds. 3d. Persons violating this Order will be arrested." Union authorities in Lexington were quite nervous considering the movements of Edmund Kirby Smith's Confederate forces moving northwards. On August 30, Smith would defeat Union forces at Richmond, Kentucky and would occupy Lexington on September 2 following a hasty Union withdrawal. Confederate forces would only occupy Lexington for a month. The massive losses at Perryville forced the rebels to abandon the entire state. Though considered a "golden boy", Wallace soon became the scapegoat for the enormous Union losses at Shiloh. He was reassigned to this much less glamorous post in June 1862. Chipping with small losses and stains at right and left margins due to the original posting with glue, light vertical folds, else very good. A rare survivor, actually hung outside, and surprisingly bright and clean considering. (Est. $3,000-4,000)
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702. Large and fine content broadside, 16 1/4 x 15", Winchester, Va., March 13, 1862 being Gen. Nathaniel Banks' orders (No. 26) quarantining federal troops to their camps in order to reduce negative interaction with the local civilian population. "The troops are cautioned against any injury to private or public property, or any interference with the rights of citizens. Every abuse of this character, by whosoever committed, will be rigidly investigated and punished with severity. The Commanding General learns with sincere regret that officers in some cases, from mistaken views, either tolerate or encourage depredations upon property. This is deeply regretted. He calls upon them to reflect upon the destructive influences which attend such practices, and to remember the declaration of the great master of the art of war, that pillage is the most certain method of disorganizing and destroying an army..." Partial separations at folds and a few marginal tears, silked on verso, else mostly very clean and bright.
(Est. $500-800)
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Early Civil War Army recruiting poster.

703. Circa October or November 1861 broadside seeking enlistments for a popular Massachusetts militia regiment that was soon to be named the "24th Regiment Mass. Vol. Inf'y" bold headlines (up to 3 _" high): "THE BEST REGIMENT YET!... N.E.G.... N.E. GUARD REGIMENT OF BOSTON... COL. T.G. STEVENSON... RECRUITS WANTED IMMEDIATELY FOR CAPTAIN AUSTIN'S COMPANY... This Regiment Will Be Detailed for Special Service Under Gen Sherman of the U.S. Army and No Pains Will Be Spared to Make it the Best Regiment That Has Yet Gone From Massachusetts... Pay and Rations Commences Upon Enlistment." With offers bounties for enlistment and another "100 Dollars Bounty at the Expiration of the War" Size 17" x 24" (blank reverse) with Salem, Mass. printer's signature. Colonel Stevenson led the outfit until Dec. of 1862 when promoted to General and command of an Army Division; was killed-in-action at Battle of Spottsylvania, 1864. Captain Austin (of Salem, Mass.) led Co. B of the outfit. Light aging and in exc. condition. Light damp stain upper left corner; tiny piece out extreme lower right corner of blank margin. The 24th Regiment saw service right through to the end of the war, its first action with Burnside's expeditions to North Carolina and other Carolina campaigns; Battle of Secessionville; Assault and siege on Fort Wagner, Morris Island; Campaign in Florida; Battles of Petersburg and Richmond; Drewry's Bluff; Bermuda Hundred and more. (Est. $3,500-5,000)
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Republicans lash out against a "Copperhead" Democratic candidate in 1863.

704. One can almost feel the venom dripping from the virulent condemnation of George Washington Woodward running for governor of Pennsylvania - issued during the height of the Civil War in the fall of 1863. "JUDGE WOODWARD ON THE WAR!" (in 2 1/2" high lettering) are the headlines on this original 1863 poster (18"x 24"; blank reverse). Then follows a statement from a local citizen dated "Philadelphia Oct. 2, 1863" relating his personal experience as he accompanied Woodward "... on the Tuesday after the Battle of Gettysburg... for the purpose of visiting the battlefield." Riding with him by stage to Gettysburg and listening to a conversation in which Woodward "denounced the [Lincoln] administration and the war in very strong, decided terms... as unconstitutional and an abolition war... in which the North could gain neither credit nor honor... I was shocked at the sentiments uttered by one who held such high judicial position."Then follows a statement from another local citizen expressing similar sentiments who was "shocked at the sentiments avowed by Judge Woodward in a conversation [on the war]". Direct quotes from a letter by former President Franklin Pierce (1853-1857) from a letter he wrote to Jefferson Davis on January 6, 1860 fills lower segment of poster, expressing extremely strong anti-abolition feelings and that "... if through the madness of northern abolitionists that dire calamity must come, the fighting will not be along Mason and Dixon' line alone. It will be within our own borders, in our own streets..." Clearly expressing the sentiments of the contemptuous Republicans who obviously issued this poster is their retort in the bold sub-heading along the bottom: "THUS WERE SOUTHERN TRAITORS LURED TO DESTROY THEIR COUNTRY, AND NOW THE PROMISE IS TO BE REDEEMED BY GIVING THE GOVERNMENT 'OCCUPATION ENOUGH AT HOME' ". Poster showing its age; almost entirely intact, some brown spotting and a damp stain along bottom; some tears on centerfold with an old partial tape repair on bottom section which should be redone. Few small sections of two letters of the top headline and a very small section of a few letters in the center of the bottom will need reconstruction. Well worth restoring. Judge Woodward had an impressive career: earlier nominated for Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court; later Chief Justice of the Penna. Supreme Court; a U.S. Congressman in post-war years and prominent in state and national Democratic party affairs. This poster superbly imparts the heated feelings engendered by the political differences of those turbulent war years! (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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Including
Clara Barton's
volume listing
the dead at Andersonville.


705. An important set of volumes, comprising what we believe to be the most comprehensive set of volumes chronicling the place of burial for the entire Union Army! The group of nine books, all in titled wraps includes the scarce four volume set, Statement of the Disposition of Some of the Bodies of Deceased Union soldiers and Prisoners of War Whose Remains Have Been Removed to National Cemeteries in the Southern and Western States. (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1868-9.) Four (4) vols., being a comprehensive listing of each original burying place together with the number in each grave as well as the corresponding final resting place. Also includes a very scarce 1868 edition of Clara Barton's work with Dorence Atwater, A List of the Union Soldiers Buried at Andersonville. Copied from the Official Record in the Surgeon's Office at Andersonville. (New York: Published by the Tribune Association, 1868), 7p. The group also includes a first edition of the report commissioned by the U. S. Sanitary Commission, Narrative of Privations and Sufferings of United States Officers and Soldiers while Prisoners of War in the Hands of the Rebel Authorities... with an Appendix, Containing the Testimony. (Philadelphia: King & Baird, 1864) 283p. Contains four printed reproductions of some of the more horrifying photographs taken from the recently liberated Confederate prison at Andersonville. Offered with another 1864 edition of the same work printed in Boston "at the office of 'Littell's Living Age'...", 86p., not illustrated but includes an extra piece reprinting Alexander H. Stephen's last ditch speech to avert the war in January 1861. The capstone to the collection is the Quartermaster General's, Alphabetical Index to Places of Interment of Deceased Union Soldiers in the Various States and Territories as Specified in Rolls of Honor Nos. I---XIII... (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1868), 16p. Overall condition is quite good, unusual for paper bound volumes like these, a few light dampstains, marginal chipping on several volumes and the occasional cover detached. Housed in a custom clamshell box with titled spine. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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A detailed listing of the C.S.A.
government - Jefferson Davis' term of office didn't conclude until 1868!


706. Confederate States Almanac And Repository Of Useful Knowledge, For the Year 1865. H.C. Clarke, Publisher. (Mobile, AL: 1865.) 8vo, 96p. Printed wraps, front cover appears to be an early facsimile on old coated stock, back wrap has slight loss at one corner and chipping at edges, partially separated, one light dampstain. Very good or better. First edition. This is no ordinary almanac - it resembles Clarke's Diary of the War for Separation published at the beginning of 1863. Like that "Diary," this almanac gives a daily account of all military actions up to the time of publication. It lists information about the weather, the zodiac and astrological projections, and a complete breakdown of the C.S.A. government with all its officials. There is also a diary for the year naming all the major skirmishes, battles, and cites engagements with the numbers of killed, wounded, and prisoners captured for each of the previous years. There are extensive articles on the new Confdederate tax laws and a detailed "Comparative View of the Capital Wealth and Annual Product of the Northern and Southern States." The back wrap presents ads for several publications including the Southern Illustrated News "the best family journal in the Southern Confederacy." A tremendously rare imprint... we suspect one of very few to survive. (Est. $1,000-1,200)
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707. Stand By The President! An Address Delivered Before The National Union Association, Of Cincinnati, March 6, 1863. By Rev. Charles G. Ames. Printed pamphlet, 15 pages, stitched, self-wraps. Philadelphia: 1863. Monaghan 169. A forceful defense of the President which declares him "no despot" and commences with a quote -- about subduing the enemy -- from "Abraham Lincoln, God bless him!" Ames, a native of Dorchester, Mass., was a Free Baptist and later Unitarian minister, author, editor and poet, who perhaps met Lincoln during a pastorate (1859-62) in Bloomington, Ill. He afterwards labored in Albany, N.Y. and Minneapolis. Wraps loose; moderate foxing and age-toning. (Est. $40-60)
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The most influential Minister in America...
on Emanicpation and
the African American plight in 1861.

708. Beecher, Henry Ward. War and Emancipation - A Thanksgiving Sermon, Preached in the Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, NY on Thursday, November 21, 1861. (T. B. Peterson & Brothers, Philadelphia: 1861) Octavo, 32p. pamphlet, original printed wrappers, some minor nicks and chips to edges of wraps, else very good. An extremely important piece of African-Americana. Reverend Beecher, who was always watchful of the development of the anti-slavery sentiment, had invited Lincoln - along with the Young Men's Republican Club - to lecture in his Plymouth Church, Brooklyn. The invitation was accepted with the provision that the lecture might be a political speech. It subsequently became a more sizable event hosted at the Cooper Institute. (Est. $200-300)
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709. A wonderful souvenir program for Paul Philippoteaux's "Cyclorama of the Battle of Gettysburg" as "Permanently Located in Philadelphia at the corner of Broad and Cherry Streets." Printed circa 1890, 6 x 9", titled and illustrated wraps. Phillippoteaux was hired in 1879 to paint a 360 degree representation of the battle. His first Gettysburg Cyclorama opened in Chicago in 1882 to great acclaim. So popular was the exhibit that another painting was commissioned for exhibition in Boston. Soon New York and Philadelphia clamored for their own. Of the four massive (22 x 376 feet) paintings, only one survives today (the Boston edition) and is currently undergoing restoration at Gettysburg National Military Park. The other three editions have been lost, one of which was cut into sections for use as tents on the Shoshone Indian Reservation. A few minor marginal chips to wraps, else fine. (Est. $100-200)
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710. Great end-of-the war celebratory ephemera! 4 1/4 x 7 1/2" patriotic handbill, declaring "Victory! Victory!! Victory!!! We Celebrate The Fall of Richmond April 3rd, 1865." Printed in red and blue. Appears trimmed along left and bottom edges, affixed to second sheet, enjoys quite bold colors. (The last example we sold, some four years ago, realized $400.) (Est. $300-400)
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N.Y.C. honors "Beast Butler" for suppressing election violence - an invitation issued the day Lincoln is reelected!

711. Scarce (most likely unique!) invitation for a NYC tribute to Gen. Benjamin Butler, 5 x 8" printed in purple, a reception at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. Issued November 11, 1864 - the day President Lincoln was reelected with the Electoral College support of all but New Jersey and Delaware - for a gathering set for the following Monday the 14th. This invite was issued to A.T. Stewart, the "Merchant Prince" of New York whose retail store was the largest in the U.S. and generally considered father of the modern department store. Butler was to be feted for bringing forces into New York that would quiet the City's discontent during the 1864 campaign. The infamous Draft Riots the year before and rampant Copperhead sympathies threatened to erupt in the election Lincoln was supposed to lose. The listing of Committee members for this event includes the most wealthy and prominent of New York's society including future Vice President Levi Morton, Mayor Opdyke, and James Low. Together with transmittal envelope, fabulous! (Est. $250-300)
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712. Celebrating the Fourth in Jefferson! A striking 5 3/4 x 12", broadside for a Civil War period Independence Day celebration featuring an eagle at top center holding the banner: "One Flag! One Country!" above the "Programme of Exercises for the Fourth in Jefferson!" Two minor pin holes, one minor fold separation not affecting text, very light toning, else very good to fine. (Est. $100-150)
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713. Relief for war widows! Printed circular, 2p., 6 x 9 1/2", Washington, 1890 providing details on new pension benefits for the widows of Army and Navy veterans. With blank application on verso. Scarce, quite fine. (Est. $80-100)
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714. A pair of political imprints, including a lengthy denunciation of the record of Benjamin Butler, headed "Butler's Blunders," 6 1/2 x 10". Butler ran for Governor of Mass. in 1878, 1879 and 1882 only winning on the third try. Offered together with a 5 1/4 x 8" flyer opposing the Massachusetts Sumptuary Laws, blaming them on "fanatical and secret influences, under the pretence of moral reform and the public good." Both bear creases, marginal tears, else very good. (Est. $100-200)
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715. A tremendous rarity... a wonderful piece of early medical ephemera, a pass printed on blue card stock, 5 x 3 1/2", with a skull prominently printed at center, admitting Mr. D. Herbert Plank to the "Winter Course of 1865-6" of "Practical Anatomy" at the University of Pennsylvania. Very fine condition. This is quite a unique, evocative graphic of significance. (Est. $300-600)
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716. Celebrating the Fall of Atlanta in Beantown! A nearly pristine handbill, on yellow paper, simply headed "ATLANTA!", 4 3/4" x 5 3/4", Cambridge, Sept. 3, 1864. Printed the day Confederate forces evacuated Atlanta before Sherman's army. The flyer implores "All patriotic and Union-loving Citizens of CAMBRIDGE, are invited to meet at CITY HALL.., to congratulate each other on this glorious event..." The fall of Atlanta was of course also a turning point in Lincoln's political fortunes, allowing him to defeat McClellan in November. Small hole at margin, a few light creases, else very fine condition. Rare! (Est. $400-600)
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717. New York Draft Riot Check. A partly printed check, 8 1/4" x 3 3/4", New York, October 15, 1863, with red lettering at left reading "Riot Damages". Signed by New York Mayor George OPDYKE (1805-80). Updike was a delegate to the National Republican convention in 1860 and was instrumental in bringing forth Lincoln's nomination for President. In this case John La Forge was reimbursed $41.00. Punch cancellation barely affects text, else fine. (Est. $80-100)
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718. A rare piece of patriotic ephemera! "Panorama of Washington." A fine print by Magnus, 9 x 31" hand-colored in red, blue, green, and yellow, bearing a large portrait of Washington at top center, bracketed by the slogan "First in War First in Peace". Includes views of the Senate and House Chambers, the Capitol, White House, War Department, Georgetown, the Smithsonian, the Observatory, the Washington Monument, Willard Hotel and many other prominent buildings and monuments. Designed to fold into the matching envelope featuring several hand-colored vignettes. A few minor tears to envelope, print lightly foxed, a bit weak at folds, some repaired on verso, but otherwise quite bright with vivid colors. (Est. $600-800)
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719. "The Union Rose." Another rare piece of ephemera, an elaborate fold-out greeting card, 10" diam., with die-cut margin and matching envelope by Charles Magnus, printed mostly in copper, with a rose in one quadrant in red with a green background. A most exquisite piece featuring numerous views of northern cities and their prominent landmarks including New York, Albany, Boston, Portland, Buffalo, Washington, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, St. Louis, Cincinnati, and Louisville. Center bears the slogan: "Our Land of Liberty One and Inseparable". A most wonderful and rare piece of Civil War ephemera. Envelope bears an image of the North Western Sanitary Fair in Chicago. Very minor loss to top right of envelope, barely detectible, while the card is near pristine. (Est. $300-500)
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720. A scarce Confederate patriotic card, 3 x 4 1/2", in red and blue, with a portrait of Jefferson Davis on a shield: "TRUTH IS MIGHTY. THE SOUTH TO THE RESCUE." Light even toning, else in excellent condition. (Est. $150-200)
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721. An interesting Sanitary Fair related document, a page of receipts, pre-printed in red and blue bearing the banner (on the American flag) for the Cooper Shop "Volunteer Refreshment Saloon", 8 1/4 x 13", Philadelphia, July 6, 1865, listing various sums disbursed for a variety of supplies including "Lanterns", "Milk", "Hams", and "Hawling [sic]". A few marginal tears at top, else fine content.
(Est. $100-200)
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722. Mounted albumen "The Defenders of Our Union. Published by C. F. May. 519 Eighth Avenue, New York [1862]." A 9 3/4 x 6 1/2" albumen photograph, affixed to a 12 x 9 1/4" mount, shows President Lincoln and forty-one Union military men. Each portrait is numbered and identified in a key printed below. McClellan, Scott, Burnside, Grant, Halleck, Robert Anderson, Ellsworth, Edward Baker and others are depicted. The mount has two small tears and some light staining, but the albumen is in usually fine condition - quite bold and crisp. (Est. $400-500)
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723. "Dirge Sung at the Consecration of the Soldiers' Cemetery at Gettysburg." Sheet music, 6p. (incl. covers) 9 1/4" x 12 1/2". Not dated but "Published by the surviving daughters" of one of the original singers who were present at the consecration ceremonies, November 19, 1863. Light dampstain, one horizontal fold, else fine. (Est. $50-75)
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724. "Popular Union Songs." Broadside, 13 1/4" x 18", no place, date or publisher, but likely 1862 as "Fort Donelson is taken" is near top of the list. Other titles include "Star Spangled Banner", "When this Cruel War is Over", "Going to Fight Mit Siegel", "Mother is the Battle Over?" and other favorites. Text slightly faded, weak and split folds professionally repaired on verso with archival tape. (Est. $200-300)
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725. Directing a "Habitual Order of Battle" - how the 3rd Army Corps forces would move into the field for skirmishes and engagement n open battle. A special "Circular," issued from Head Quarters, 3rd Army, November 6, 1863, signed by O.H. Hart as Ast. Adj. Gen. under command of Maj. Gen. French. Detailed listing on which divisions would be deployed and the order of those movements when encountering the enemy: "In massing troops for skirmishing in the woods or when covered by a deployed line the column of attack (double on the centre) is the best formation for rapid deployment in any direction." Orders of this sort defined how the carnage would take place in a more "orderly" fassion. Docketed on verso, excellent. (Est. $80-120)
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726. A very special item... an officer's memorial hand wrought on drum-head skin. Memorial to a fallen member of the 10th N.Y.V. An ornately decorated manuscript D.S. by Col. John E. BENDIX (1818-77), 11 x 14", Falmouth, Va., December 25, 1862, mourning the loss of Lieutenant James M. Yardley who was killed at Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862. The formal document was engrossed as a presentation to Yardley's mother and sister and reads in part: "...we deplore in the untimely death of Lt. James M. Yardley when upon the threshold of manhood the sudden extinguishment of a life rendered full of promise by the possession of so many qualities eminently requisite to the solider and the man..." During the regiment's advance through Fredericksburg on Princess Anne Street, on the morning of December 13, Col. Bendix was wounded in the face by a shell explosion and command devolved upon Captain Winchester. Winchester along with Lieutenant Yardley were both mortally wounded after the regiment spent two hours on the front lines under heavy fire. In total the regiment suffered 9 killed, 54 wounded and four missing out of 214 men. Light foxing and cockling, some text a tad light, else very good condition. A poignant and unusual display piece. (Est. $700-900)
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727. The Last Ditch of the Chivalry, or a President in Petticoats. A good example of the mocking Currier and Ives take on the pursuit and capture of Jeff Davis. 14 1/2 x 10" (16 1/2 x 13" overall framed). Several small marginal tears, bright. (Est. $300-400)
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Dancing with Robert E. Lee?

728. A very unusual piece, a small albumen photograph (1 3/4 x 2") bearing a chest-up portrait of Lee in Confederate uniform mounted to the face of an unengrossed dance card. The card (2 1/4 x 3 1/2") bears gold decorations at margins reminiscent of a sea shell and is bound with cord at center. A truly unusal piece simply framed for display. (Est. $600-800)
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RELICS AND EQUIPMENT

A significant relic... an early, hand-made American Standard: The U.S. flag with twelve stars!

729. We will detail all we can and invite any vexillologist (a person who studies flags!) to discern the rest. Twelve stars, thirteen stripes, measures 43 x 28" with typical fraying at edges and one light area of bleeding from the red stripes. Hand-stitched, the flag itself appears to have been made far earlier than the addition of a band of canvas selvedge with early hand-punched brass grommet. The pattern for each star has been hand-cut and then sewn to be visible from both sides for display. There is an early strip of cloth detailing provenance... the meaning now long lost: "C.V.D.H. at Dr. Brown's." Made of hand-spun linen, we have not been able to define with any certainty the vintage of this magnificent textile. The number of stars doesn't define the period... but this certainly could date to the late 18th early 19th century. We believe the latest this personal, tangible statement of patriotism could date is the Civil War. First sewn to define a fledgling nation June 14, 1777, in Philadelphia, early flags remain defining, evocative touchstones. This example would look impressive properly stitched to an archival board and professionally framed! (We have not detailed an estimate given our ignorance on what would be appropriate.) (OPEN)
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One of the most famous "relic" books for the Lincoln bibliophile....
with fabric from Mary Todd Lincoln's
childhood home!

730. The True Story of Mary, Wife of Lincoln, Katherine Helm. (Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York: 1928.) Limited (First) Edtion, #75 of 175, with inlaid red damask swatch on cover. 310p., pages remain untrimmed, cover slightly sunned with one small area of stain/discoloration, interior remains a clean, tight copy. Katherine Helm (1857-1937) was the daughter of Emilie Todd Helm and Ben Hardin Helm. Emilie was the younger half-sister of Mary Todd Lincoln. The fifteenth of Robert Todd's sixteen children, Emilie was but three years old when Mary left their Lexington home. During the Civil War, Ben Hardin Helm, a Confederate general, was killed at the battle of Chickamauga. After her husband's death, Emilie and her daughter Katherine stayed with the Lincolns at the White House. Emilie also knew the Lincolns quite well from a stay in Springfield in 1855-6. In 1928, Katherine Helm published The True Story of Mary, Wife of Lincoln based on her mother's recollections, diary and articles Emilie had written about her relationship with the Lincoln family. Though a rather sentimental work, the book still provides an intimate glimpse into the life of Mary Lincoln. It was published in two editions, a trade edition and a special limited printing of 175 copies. The limited edition is unique in that, laid onto the front cover, is a 6-1/2" x 3" piece of red damask material taken from a drapery panel that hung in the Robert Todd home in Lexington when Mary Todd Lincoln was a child. The drapery material was preserved in the Todd and Helm families. Thus the rarity of the book results not only from the small number of copies printed, but through the relic preserved on the cover as well. Housed in custom slip-case, a fine copy. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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731. An evocative - and potentially quite useful! - relic. A handsome, 10" gavel made from two sources closely associated with Lincoln: we believe the handle was turned from a plank from the doorframe of the Ninian Edwards House where Abe and Mary were married; the head from a tree Lincoln had planted in front of his Springfield house. A silver band adorns the stem "Lincoln Wood Relic." Dates to 1925, made and sold by H.E. Barker in his Springfield art store. Now... should you have a tough piece of flank steak needing tenderizing... or plan to host a trial of your own... need we say more? The last example on the market sold for $1,200. A fun, scarce item. (Est. $750-1,000)
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An original piece of Lincoln's Law office.

732. A 4 1/2 x 1 1/4" piece of lath removed from the ceiling of Lincoln's third-floor office in the Tinsley building at 6th and Adams Streets in Springfield. Removed by James T. Hickey in 1968 during the restoration of the building to its 1840's appearance when Lincoln occupied those offices, first with Logan and later Herndon. Offered together with a letter from the legendary Lincoln scholar and curator, R. Gerald McMurtry, dated October 10, 1969 enclosing the piece of lathe to George R. Mills of Dearborn, Michigan. A wonderful relic with perfect provenance. (OPEN)
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"Stand by the Union."

733. 1850 Model Field Officer's Sword. Manufactured by Schuyler, Hartley and Graham, 37" in length (including handle) with three-quarters of the original leather scabbard (includes locket, missing drag). No doubt used by a Union officer in the War as the blade bears numerous patriotic motifs and the slogan "Stand by the Union" on both faces near the base. Pitting and some light rust to blade, some oxidation on handle and rubbing to grip. Overall in very good condition. A wonderful display piece speaking to the true elegance of 19th century weaponry.
(Est. $750-1,000)


734. Battlefield Silverware Set. Officer's Portable Dining Kit. A set of three pieces, including a folding knife, fork and spoon, each measuring 3" long when closed, housed in a cloth purse. Usual wear, else very good. (Est. $300-500)
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735. Civil War Era Bugle. A brass military bugle measuring 17" long. Stamped "BOHEMIA" at mouthpiece end. A few minor dents and minimum of oxidation. (Est. $400-600)
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736. Union Cartridge Box with strap. Leather cartridge box with brass plate marked "U S". Beneath the double flaps is a space for cartridges (with open tin boxes for lining) together with a smaller pouch for caps. Usual wear, else very good.
(Est. $400-600)
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737. Union Soldier's Knapsack. A rare survivor, a William Butterfield 1863 New York contract knapsack, constructed of cloth which has been tarred for waterproofing, with leather straps. Some metal parts may have been replaced, otherwise completely original. Numerous tears from heavy use, otherwise amazingly intact. (Est. $400-600)
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738. Civil War Era Field Glasses. A fine set of field glasses, 6" long, manufactured by Colmont of Paris. With leather case (top detached). Leather grip covering loose on one side and missing on end of lens. (Est. $400-600)
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739. Union Belt with Buckle. A Union soldier's belt with brass buckle bearing the American Eagle with shield and laurels. Heavily worn, typical leather aging. (Est. $400-600)
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740. RARE Confederate Navy Button. A rare example, 1 1/4" in diameter, hardened rubber, bearing two crossed canons over an anchor and the initials "C N", marked on verso: "Courtney & Tennent / Charleston, S.C. / Manton's Patent." Overall quite clean. (Est. $400-600)
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741. Bullet in Wood. The lead remnants of a minie ball lodged in a 9" long piece of wood recovered from a Civil War battlefield. A graphic example of how a soft, lead projectile can expand in size when hitting a hard object (read: human bone) and cause significant harm. (OPEN)
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Recovered from the ruins of the Bank of Charleston.

742. Raising the Flag Over Fort Sumter. A printed Document, 1p. 5 x 6 1/2", Washington, March 27, 1865, being General Orders, No. 50 in which Lincoln orders "That at the hour of noon, on the 14th day of April, 1865, Brevet major General ANDERSON will raise and plant upon the ruins of Fort Sumter, in Charleston harbor, the same United States flag which floated over the battlements of that Fort during the rebel assault, and which was lowered and saluted by him, and the small force of his command when the works were evacuated on the 14th day of April 1861..." Lincoln further stipulates "...the flag, when raised, be saluted by one hundred guns from Fort Sumter, and by a National salute from every fort and rebel battery that fired upon Fort Sumter..." At bottom, a previous owner has written a most interesting note of provenance: "This paper was picked from some rubbish in the Bank of Charleston; where a 200lb shot had passed through the roof & back wall, which was received as a notice to quit, and obeyed. Farely July 22, 65." Marginal tears, weak folds repaired on verso, even toning, else very good. (Est. $100-200)
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NUMISMATICA, EXONUMIA, PHILATELIC AND LIKE MATERIAL

A superb example -
a masterpiece in medallic art!

743. The classic Victor David Brenner bas-relief copper plaque, "Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865." 7 x 9 1/2", with 1907 copyright incused at side, this example enjoys a rich patina - quite lovely in appearance, and is mounted on the original presentation green marble with T-bar stand on verso, 8 1/2 x 11" overall. Brenner (1871-1924), a native of Lithuania, is best known as the designer of the Lincoln penny. (Interestingly, his initials first appeared on the cent in 1909, at the bottom of the back side of the cent. It was removed in the second half of 1909 only to reappear on the shoulder in 1918. Don't ask us why... contact your local numismatist!) We sold a particularly fine example mounted on a marble base four years ago for $3,000. This specimen is equally desirable. (Est. $2,000-3,000)
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744. Another Brenner, a fine example, this without the marble base, includes 1907 copyright. A rich, dark patina overall, very minor light scratches, displays quite handsomely. In our humble opinion, EVERY Lincoln collection should have at least one... if not several! (Est. $1,200-1,600)
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745. Another Brenner work of medallic artwork - this a small placquette. Measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 1/2", quite solid, includes Victor David Brenner's stylized marking. We have been advised this is a period issue as the lack of the "1907" date is found only in the early issues by Brenner. (The later MACO issues of the 1970s include the date.) We believe this to be an early medal but have no additional insight. As a simple work of art, quite handsome. (Est. $200-400)
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746. Bronze plaque measuring 4" across with head of "Abraham Lincoln" in profile facing right. Hanging loop brazed on at top. Similar plaques were produced of William Seward (made out of petrified wood), so we assume item to be contemporary with Lincoln's term of office. This is the first Lincoln plaque from this series we have seen. It was found in France. Excellent condition with a mellow patina. (Est. $200-400)
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747. Abraham Lincoln Peace Medal. A powerful presentation piece - an early, 19th century strike by the U.S. Mint. Copper with a rich, red mahogany patina, almost 3" in diameter. One of the finest examples you will find... AU (about uncirculated) in condition.
(Est. $400-600)
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748. Lincoln Mourning Medal. Copper, 1865 (50 mm.) with a profile bust of Lincoln and a broken column on verso with the words: "He is in Glory and the Nation in Tears." Generally uncirculated, one cleaned spot of tarnish and minor scrape detracts little. By medalist W.H. Key of Philadelphia. (Est. $60-80)
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749. Same as previous lot, this in white metal. Bright uncirculated with reflective surfaces. Fine. (Est. $80-120)
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750. Bearded Lincoln Copper Medal. Commemorative bearing a bearded Lincoln and the Capitol on verso. 38mm. Unmarked but by medalist William Key of Philadelphia. Uncirculated, nicely toned, circa 1880. We have never seen this particular medal before. (Est. $80-120)
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751. 1865 Mourning Medal. An oval gilt brass medal by the Swiss medalist Hughues Bovy, 21 x 24mm. with the words "Martyr to Liberty" and the date of death, April 15, 1865 on verso. Uncirculated. (Est. $50-80)
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752. G.A.R. Lincoln Medal. A striking bronze medal (76 mm) struck for the Grand Army of the Republic on the 100th anniversary of Lincoln's birth. Issued by Davison's Sons of Philadelphia. Uncirculated with original matte finish. Scarce. (Est. $50-75)
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753. Lincoln Medallion. Gilded copper medallion, 45 mm., bearing a three-quarter view of an unbearded Lincoln based on Alexander Hesler's photograph and sculpted by H. Zearing. Verso bears: "With Malice Toward / None with Charity / for All with Firmness / in the Right as God / Gives Us to See the / Right Let Us Strive On" and "Let Us Have Faith That / Right Makes Might and / in That Faith Let Us / to the End Dare to / Do Our Duty as We / Understand It." About uncirculated. A fine 1909 issue. (Est. $50-75)
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754. Pair of rectangular placquettes. Each one-sided, copper, one measures 38 x 56 mm., circa 1909, the tombstone shaped medal measures 35 x 52mm. Each quite lovely, in excellent condition.
(Est. $40-80)
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Incredible folk art medallion spinner!

755. A great, Victorian display piece! A wonderfully-crafted, wooden stand housing a 1909 G.A.R. bronze medallion commemorating the 100th anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln. The medallion is mounted on a spindle which rotates by means of an eagle finial. The central frame has blocked corners, a gold-lined spandrel, and silver stars at the corners. It swivels on a central axis. A gold sphere is attached beneath the frame. All components of the assemblage have a dark, cherry stain which is beautifully alligatored. The only other example we have encountered sold in our fifth auction six years ago for just a tick under $1,000. And, as we praised the item back then: "Imaginative with character up the wazoo!" (Est. $500-750)
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756. DIX, John A. (1798-1879), Union Maj. Gen. of Volunteers, renowned for his order to "shoot ...on the spot" anyone tearing down the U.S. flag; Sec. War Stanton's conduit for disseminating war news (including that of Lincoln's murder) while headquartered in N.Y.C., the country's telegraph hub. Engraved construction stock certificate of the Mississippi & Missouri Railroad Co., signed by Dix as President, 1 page, oblong small 4to, N.Y., n.d. (1850's). Unissued; in rich blue on light paper, with beautiful central vignette of Indians, buffalo and steam train plus smaller ones of steamboat and warrior with tomahawk. The Mississippi and Missouri co-owned the first railroad bridge across the Mississippi River, between Rock Island, Ill. and Davenport, Iowa. When it was hit in 1856 by the steamboat Effie Afton, which burned and sank, the resulting lawsuit became one of Abraham Lincoln's most famous cases, in which he declared that the right of railroads to bridge rivers equaled that of steamboats to navigate them. Excellent. (Est. $100-200)
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757. Payable "Two Years After the Ratification of a Treaty of Peace with the United States." Confederate Bond. A scarce, 11 x 8" uninscribed $1,000 6% "non-Taxable Certificate" as approved by the Rebel government February 17, 1864. Printed by B. Duncan of Richmond, this pristine financial note includes a rather halcyon scene of a shepherd minding his sheep at top. (Odd such an idyllic engraving would adorn a war bond!) Great! (Est. $100-150)
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758. Two pieces of Civil War era financial paper including a sheet of U.S. Depository receipts, gem original, unused set of three printed in blue, 13 3/4 x 8 1/2". Together with a similar sized set of three Treasury checks bearing the image of Edwin Stanton. both in fine condition with only pin holes at left margin. (Est. $100-200)
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759. A full, 9 x 8" plate of seventy (70) 10-cent Jeff Davis stamps. This sheet was printed from the original plate by the legendary philatelist (stamp collector) A. Dietz in 1926. We are told that he discovered the original printer's plates for all Confederate issues. Would look great framed for display. (Est. $150-250)
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760. An unengrossed Confederate Bond, 12 1/4 x 9", printed by Hoyer & Ludwig of Richmond. An eight percent bond based on the "Act of May 16, 1861". Light creases, small pin hole, light foxing, else very good. (Est. $100-200)
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