LATE ADDITIONS...
AND SOME VERY SPECIAL LOTS!


A document with some of the scarcest
signatures in the Lincoln story.

1108. A most unique document signed by some of the leading citizens of Washington, D.C. Two page LS with a page and a half of signatures endorsing the letter, May 9, 1866, verso of first page with mounting remnants, some age and foxing, the two-sided signature page has light age and foxing as well. Written to an Abner Brady by members of his gymnasium in "high appreciation... as well as for your indefatigable zeal in promoting the physical well being of all who have placed themselves under your instruction." They must have been quite taken with this fellow... perhaps the Jack LaLanne of his day (did he sell his own juicer?) in that they rented out the Grover Theatre to host a benefit on his behalf. This letter of recognition is signed by numerous personages... including: LAMON, Ward Hill. (1828-93) Illinois lawyer, later Washington Marshal and Lincoln bodyguard whom the President called "my particular friend." Lamon's Life of Abraham Lincoln (1872) was based chiefly on material which Lamon bought from W.H. Herndon. And, GARDNER, Alexander. (1821-82) Photographer, born in Paisley, Scotland. Technical innovator and skilled manager of Mathew Brady's Washington studio 1856-63, he left to take documentary photographs and run his own studio when Brady refused to give photo credits to his war photographers. (Examples of his signature are prohibitively rare... a unique signed check is currently being offered by a national dealer for $4,250.) We also find such figures as Ely S. PARKER (last Grand Sachem of the Iroquois and General Grant's military secretary), P. T. HUDSON (Grant's aide-de-camp during the Overland Campaign), John GOLDIN (photographer who created the Lincoln death-room CDV), and Henry Clay FORD. Numerous Regular Army officers have also penned their names. Washington luminaries such as leading printers and merchants of that city are likewise found.
(Est. $2,000-2,500)
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1109. Douglas-Johnson back-to-back ferrotype doughnut. This is the largest doughnut, measuring 47 mm. in diameter. The raised copper frame has ferrotype portraits of Stephen A. Douglas and Herschel V. Johnson. Both portraits are in sharp focus with good contrast and flat surfaces; however, each ferrotype contains a fine network of crazing which is noticeable upon magnification. The overall appearance of the Johnson side is excellent, while the Douglas has a decent appearance, with two black marks in the background, three inconsequential spots in the portrait, and a general light haze. It remains a very decent specimen, missing from most collections.There is no flaking, chipping, or bubbling. (Est. $2,000-2,500)
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1110. Douglas-Johnson ferrotype jugate. Conjoined busts of "Douglas and Johnson" set within a gilded brass beaded frame. Manufactured by Steele & Johnson of Waterbury, CT. The Douglas jugate is considered the rarest in the set issued for all 1860 candidates. The emulsion surface is smooth and glossy with only a tiny, inconsequential scratch between the portraits marring the otherwise pristine appearence. The portraits are bold and in sharp focus, but somewhat dark, as made. In spite of this, it appears especially nice when viewed in natural or a bright light. Lacks the original stickpin attachment. (Est. $1,500-2,000)
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1111. Lincoln crossed rails medal. Sullivan-DeWitt AL-1860-12 in white metal, 38 mm. Extremely Fine condition with overall tarnish and traces of original lustre on both sides. The bust by Key is perhaps the most handsome one executed for the campaign. While not a high grade specimen, still quite decent. (Est. $150-200)
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1112. Oval Lincoln albumen brooch, 28 x 35 mm. This unique brooch has an albumen portrait of a beardless Lincoln within a wreath. The initials "A.L." are beneath the portrait, flanked by curlicues. Brooches of this type were popular in the Civil War period. We feel this example was issued during Lincoln's lifetime, as most memorial badges and brooches utilized bearded portraits (whereas ribbons utilized both beardless and bearded). An impressive piece, in any event, and totally "unmolested." Retains the original T-bar attachment, but with replacement of the linchpin. (Est. $800-1,200)
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1113. Lincoln gem ferro in 20 x 26 mm. copper frame. This 1864 ferrotype badge has a "large head" portrait of Lincoln taken after the engraving by Sartain. Ferrotype is clear and bold, but with numerous defects (slight horizontal crease, black marks in the background, a small hole in the upper right-hand corner and chips on Lincoln's right cheek and above the right eye, both of which tend to blend in). This exact pose is unique to our knowledge (we have seen one other example with a smaller image) and is more-than-presentable. (Est. $300-400)
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1114. McClellan-Pendleton back-to-back Gault-frame ferro. Similar to Sullivan-DeWitt GMcC-1864-49 but with different portrait of Pendleton. The McClellan portrait is in excellent condition, while the Pendleton side is quite dark and barely recognizble. (Est. $500-600)
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1115. Grant-Colfax ferrotype jugate badge. Conjoined portraits of "Grant and Colfax" within a 27 mm. beveled brass frame with original pin on verso. Portraits are bold. Small black spot below the word "And", as shown, and some inconsequential surface scratches visible only upon magnification. Quite showy and impressive in size. (Est. $400-500)
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1116. Lincoln mauchlineware box. 2 1/4 x 3 3/4 x 1 1/2". This lacquered box has an engraved 3/4 standing portrait of "A. Lincoln" on the lid and an inscription on the side of the top reading "Made of Wood Which Grew Near Alloway Kirk On the Banks of the Doon." Produced in Scotland in the Victorian era. The portrait of Lincoln is rather unusual and he stands in front of the Presidential Chair with one hand on an open book. The date of production is uncertain, but could possibly be determined by researching the engraving it was based on. It could very well have been produced towards the end of the Civil War. Excellent condition and a fine display piece. A special items. (Est. $400-500)
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1117. 1864 "Lincoln Campaign Songster" published by Mason & Company of Philadelphia. 3 x 4 1/2", bound in thread, with ads on last page. Generally a fine specimen of this popular songster. Top right-hand corner of cover restored, small "bite" along left edge, as shown. Cover is slightly loose, but still attached.
(Est. $400-500)
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1118. Lincoln Stevensgraph ribbon issued for the 1865 inauguration ceremonies. This is the "first state" of this woven ribbon, inscribed "President Lincoln." After the assassination, it was reissued with the inscription "The Late Lamented President Lincoln." 2 x 8", lacking the tassel, two faint stains at top right, otherwise in fine condition. A clean, unfaded and colorful example. (Est. $500-750)
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1119. Lincoln-Washington souvenir key. 7 1/2", cast iron, with bearded bust of Lincoln on one side inscribed "1860" and bust of Washington (or possibly Jefferson) on the other, inscribed "1776". The shaft has incised lettering on both sides inscribed "Independence Hall". Originally painted white which has mostly worn off. Lincoln spoke at Independence Hall on February 22, 1861 (commemorating Washington's birthday) and this key may have been issued as a souvenir of the occasion. Excellent condition with a nice brown patina and quite scarce! (Est. $250-350)
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1120. Anti-Lincoln Currier & Ives cartoon from 1860. 12 x 16 3/4", titled "The Rail Candidate." Lincoln is lampooned in this famous print. He straddles a rail titled the "Republican Platform", supported by editor Greeley and a slave. Lincoln expresses anxiety, Greeley exudes confidence in the power of the split rail, while the slave states "Dis Nigger strong and willin, but its awful hard work carrying Old Massa Abe on nothin' but dis ere rail." Slight trimming all around, not affecting text or image. Clean and bright. Tastefully matted and framed. (Est. $600-800)
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1121. John Bell 1860 broadside. This 12 1/2 x 18" broadside announces a "Grand Union Meeting" at Greenville on October 17, 1860. "The friends of the Union, the Constitution and Enforcement of the Laws, are respectfully invited..." Distinguished speakers and a torch-light procession are promised. While Bell is not specifically mentioned, the dating and wording of this graphic broadside leave little doubt as to the political affiliation of its authors. Likely issued in Ohio. Beautifully matted and framed. The bottom right corner has been restored (imperceptibly) as well as two words in the lower text. Near-mint appearance! 1860 presidential campaign broadsides are tough! (Est. $750-1,000)
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From the greatest American actor's
personal library!

1122. BOOTH, Edwin Thomas. Considered this country's greatest Shakespearian actor, Booth first took the stage in 1849 and performed his final role as Hamlet in 1891, two years before his death. A most wonderful set of three (3) books from his personal library including his personal, signed published edition of his prompt book from his production of Richelieu - which he first staged at the Winter Garden in New York in 1866. That volume: William Winter ed., Bulwer's Drama of Richelieu As Presented by Edwin Booth (New York: Francis Hart & Company, 1878) 96p., 8vo., red leather and morocco boards with ribbed spine with gilt tilting, gilt edged pages. Boldly signed by Booth on his personal bookplate on the inside pastedown. Light rubbing to boards. Together with Henry Hinton, ed., Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth as Produced by Edwin Booth... I (New York: Samuel French & Son, 1868). 87p., 8vo., bound in red leather and cloth, ribbed gilt titled spine. Bright and clean. Also, Austin Brereton, Some Famous Hamlets from Burbage to Fechter (London: David Bogue, 1884) 74p., 8vo., in red leather and marbled boards with ribbed, gilt titled spine. Edwin's father, Junius Brutus Booth, patriarch of the family that included one notorious brother, is featured on pages 39-42. It is wonderful to hold these books that once were lovingly held by the great thespian. (In the one-man play, Barrymore, with the stage occupied in the personage of John Barrymore [1882-1942], the theater's legendary prodigal son, scion of America's second most famous acting family, expresses only one great regret: not having lived at a time to see the great Booth take the stage!) These have excellent provenance: originating from the estate of Booth's business partner and producer William Winter. (Est. $800-1,200)
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1123. This one is extremely rare! Published and sold as a solemn remembrance keepsake. Printed in 1865 during the period of national grieving, this broadside 8 x 11 includes a seldom seen very large (and quite quaint!) woodcut illustration of the martyred President. In very bold, heavy printing: "MEMENTO MORI. ...Born...Feb.. 12, 1809 / assassinated, April 15th, 1865...'most strict in his observance of what was Right-most rigid in his adherence to Justice.'" Very small piece out upper and lower corners and narrow torn piece out extreme upper right blank margin, matted to make a handsome presentation. Tributes of this sort speak to the public's insatiable need to demonstrate their sadness... but given their truly ephemeral nature, very few survive. And, this is one of the most impressive! (Est. $800-1,200)
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