WORKS OF ART

882. A monumental bust by Leonard Volk (1828-95) in dense, solid plaster. This is known as the "nude Lincoln" that was "retro-fitted" by Volk to have Lincoln draped in a toga. Standing 31" tall (17" wide at shoulders), this most impressive statue, evokes the firm but gentle nature of Lincoln. Volk, born in New York, moved to St. Louis in 1848 and studied drawing while working on funerary sculpture. Aided by Stephen Douglas, he studied art in Rome and upon his return opened a studio in Chicago in 1857. In 1860, he took one of only two life masks ever made of Lincoln which provided the template for much of his statuary work of Lincoln over the next several decades. Volk, who owed much to the patronage of Stephen Douglas, designed his monument in Chicago. Some restoration work has been done here including above the eyes, and we recommend that this piece should be professionally cleaned to restore the original luster of this most impressive, early piece of statuary.
(Est. $3,000-5,000)
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883. Fabulous, solid plaster bust, "Lincoln," with a green finish, 16 1/2" in height (8" wide at shoulders). This piece is similar to a bust of Henry Ward Beecher produced in 1896 by the Rogers Statuette Co. of New York, a successor concern to John Rogers. This version bears no inscription other than the title at base, but is obviously from the same workshop. Lincoln's face exudes warmth and compassion. One of the better renditions we have seen. We sold an example with bronze finish in our 2000 sale for $2,500. A great study. (Est. $2,000-3,000)
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Rogers offers a Council of War to Oldroyd... for free!

884. John ROGERS. (1829-1904) Sculptor whose plaster statues (known as "Rogers Groups") adorned the homes of many Victorian households. Just as Currier and Ives popularized prints marketed to the average citizen, John Rogers (1829-1904) created statuary/groups of popular subjects priced for a general market. Called America's true "populist" sculptor, between 1859 and 1893 he designed and sold castings of some eighty-seven different works. (For those interested, the New York Historical Society has the largest collection of Rogers statues known. To learn more, see Lincoln Lore #490 or David Wallace, John Rogers, The People's Sculptor, Wesleyan University Press, 1967.) Excellent content and association A.L.S., 5 1/2 x 8 1/2", New York, Nov. 8, 1883 to Osborn H. Oldroyd offering to donate a copy of The Council of War to his collection. In full: "Yours of the 3rd inst. is rec'd. I like the idea of your collection of Lincoln mementoes & will be happy to donate my group of 'The Council of War' for that purpose if you will tell me how & when to send it." Lightly and evenly toned, slightly weak at folds, else very good. Of course Oldroyd is considered the first truly "great" Lincoln collector, carefully piecing together a tremendous holding. He lived in Lincoln's Springfield home in the mid-1880's up until Robert Todd Lincoln donated the house to the State. Oldroyd then moved his collection to Washington, D.C., and put it on exhibit while living in the Petersen House, the boarding house where Lincoln died. In 1926, Oldroyd sold his monumental assemblage to the Government for $50,000 - a great deal of which can be seen in the Ford's Theatre Museum. A rare, fine content item! (Est. $100-300)
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The Council of War
885. Patented 1868, 24" tall, certainly the most powerful of all the groups of the Civil War era. This is variant "A" depicting Stanton's hands wiping his glasses behind Lincoln's head. (The position of Stanton's hands were changed in later versions reacting to criticisms that Stanton was not paying proper attention to the discussion. Another opinion was that his hands were "too close" to Lincoln's head.) The color is a gray with some flaking and chips to the paint. Someone also added gold coloring to Lincoln's chair a number of years ago. Some small flecking and a small chips at the base detract little. (This could benefit from a thorough cleaning and repainting!) Robert Todd Lincoln and Stanton both commented on how wonderful the likenesses were. We sold an example in our fifth auction six years ago setting a record at an astounding $12,000. Realistically.... (Est. $1,200-1,500)
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886. Rogers groups...in stereo! Four (4) steroviews presenting different Rogers' Groups... including the Council of War. (Est. $80-120)
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887. Abraham Lincoln by H. Miller. An unusual cast-bronze bust of Lincoln by artist H. Miller. Never before encountered, beautifully conceived likeness deftly captures Lincoln's angular features with tremendous warmth. 16" tall and 14" wide with additional 3.5" tall base (6 x 6" at bottom). Base of the bust bears the simple title "LINCOLN" and bears the signature of "H. Miller" on the back. Very likely from the turn of the century as evidenced by its rich patina.
(Est. $1,000-1,500)
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888. Bissel's Lincoln. A later "cold cast" after the noted bust by George Bissell similar to examples cast by the Gorham Company but executed later from the original molds. 17.5" tall, 5 x 5" at base and 7" at widest point. We cannot be certain of date for this specific issue but it is impressive with the patina that dates this to the early part of the century. (Est. $1,000-2,000)
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889. An impressive full standing statue of Lincoln with cape holding the Emancipation Proclamation in one hand and a quill pen in the other. Cast-metal, spelter or iron, painted brown, it stands 22 1/2" including the round base. No hallmark or copyright evident. Some scuffs resulting in the loss of some paint, else good and smooth and clean. A heavy, substantial piece. (Est. $500-800)
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890. Lincoln by Jo Davidson (1883-1952), a ruddy and earthy bronze painted solid plaster bust standing 11" with pedestal. An unusual subject for Davidson who normally sculpted statues of living subjects, best known for designing the ubiquitous (check your pocket!) Roosevelt dime in 1945. This work bears Davidson's signature on verso and 1947 date. A fine example. (Est. $300-500)
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891. A very rare, quite early (ca. 1860s-'70s) bisque bust, 12" tall, 4" wide at base and 8" at shoulders. This is one of the nicer examples similar to a like study we've seen of Charles Sumner. Overall quite clean, small stain on reverse, a few very minor scuffs, no visible chips or cracks. (Est. $400-600)
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892. One of the most difficult Centennial works to find... crafted live at the exhibition! A solid glass, white bust, 6" tall, made by the Gillander studio live in their exhibtion building at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. These were made for visitors to demonstrate their craft. We are advised examples in white are prohibitively rare. A nice hand-crafted work from molten glass - a subtantial item with heft! (Est. $400-500)
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893. Massive Civil War-Era Staffordshire Ceramic Figure of Lincoln on Horseback. This imposing, large china figurine is one of the almost innumerable varieties of figural groups manufactured in the Staffordshire region of England in the mid-19th century, both for domestic sale and for export. Interestingly, Lincoln is depicted in garb more reminiscent of a European head of state than an American president. These figures probably were high sellers in England, where our Civil War was followed with close interest. At 15.25" tall, and weighing some six pounds, this is certainly one of the most substantial Lincoln display items issued during his presidency. The figurine makes an excellent appearance, with hand colored elements in brown, yellow red, pink and black including his facial features as well as the cape, saddle, reins. Some restoration work at the necks of both Lincoln and his mount, chip to nose, a few other minor cracks and repairs which do not detract from the overall appearance. A "known commodity" in the marketplace, similar pieces have reached sale figures at the $3,000 level. This specimen should well be worth... (Est. $800-1,200)
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894. Lincoln Life Mask. Later rendering after the life mask of Leonard W. Volk. Not certain when this was cast, but does have some nice detail. A few minor scratches and abrasions, and chips, else very good. (OPEN)
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895. Lincoln wall mask after Leonard Volk. Plaster, 10 x 12" (8" deep), painted bronze. (Est. $400-600)
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896. BORGLUM, Gutzon. (1867-1941) Noted sculptor of enormous stone monuments. Best known for the four presidents carved atop Mount Rushmore. A striking photogravure of his six ton marble head of Lincoln, signed and inscribed by Borglum in the lower margin, June 12, 1936. Measures 16 x 18" overall framed. Borglum began this monumental sculpture in 1907 and at the behest of Theodore Roosevelt it was shown at the White House. The monumental head was purchased by Wall Street businessman Eugene Meyer, Jr. and presented to Congress in 1910. A most striking image in very fine condition. Not examined out of frame. (Est. $400-600)
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The only known copy
(with Lincoln included!) known.

897. THE JOLLY FLAT BOAT MEN... AND LINCOLN?
A unique c. 1860 variant from the original 1847 plate of George C. Bingham's popular painting produced by the American Art-Union. This edition likely produced for the Campaign of 1860 incorporating Abraham Lincoln into the scene. A line and mezzotint engraving after the original painting, 18.75 x 22.75 in (29 x 25 in. overall framed), entitled "...THE JOLLY FLAT BOAT MEN / of the Wabash. / Young Abe Lincoln Watching the Sports of The Jolly Flat Boat-Men...". A fascinating hand-colored engraving produced from the 1847 plate engraved by T. Downey for the American Art-Union and published circa 1860 by Wallace & Company, 37 Park Row, New York. The original steel plate was commissioned by the Art-Union in 1847; they published nearly 10,000 copies of this popular engraving. In December 1852, the Art-Union sold off many of their steel plates at auction, this being lot #404. Because the plate was worn-down due to the large printing run, Wallace & Company reworked areas of the plate including parts of the water as well as the coonskin seen hanging next to the ladder at center. The only other alteration was in the letterpress which magically placed Lincoln in the scene! Bingham, of course, painted scenes of life in Missouri and when he painted this work, he would have had no idea who Abraham Lincoln was. Fortunately for the publisher, two of the subjects do not face toward the viewer, allowing for a convenient explanation. A classic example of 19th century historical embellishment for political ends. This edition is cited in Maurice Bloch's George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonné, (1967), on page 218. Bloch cites his example from The Old Print Shop in New York. Interestingly enough, the backing of this frame bears a tag from The Old Print Shop, c. 1940. This would strongly suggest that this is the same piece cited by Bloch, and this may be the only copy extant of this edition. Vertical crease at center with some wear, horizontal folds, otherwise very good condition with bright, vibrant colors. A true rarity. (Est. $2,000-4,000)
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898. "Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the United States" A rare, and quite large close to life-size bust portrait 20 x 28", likely by Middleton, Strobridge & Co. of Cincinnati, c. 1865. The only example we have seen. Housed in a 31 x 37" frame with gilt trim. A few minor marginal tears, else fine condition. Certainly rare... first we have encountered! (Est. $700-900)
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899. 24 x 32" engraving titled "Abraham Lincoln's Last Reception Respectfully Dedicated to the People of the United States." Grant, Sherman, Farragut, Hancock, Meade, Sheridan, Butler and Halleck are shown, as well as most members of Lincoln's Cabinet, Andrew Johnson, and Charles Sumner. President Lincoln is being introduced to an attractive young lady while Mary Todd Lincoln watches with a somewhat peeved look on her face. Signed in the plate "Hohenstein" and published in England, we believe,
shortly after the assassination. Wide borders, scattered mildew and discoloration not affecting plate, housed in a period mahogany frame. This was likely based on accounts of the 1865 Inaugural Ball. (Est. $300-500)
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900. 35 x 24" huge engraving The First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation Before the Cabinet. One of the most well-known Lincoln images here in a large, crisp reproduction, engraved by A. H. Ritchie after the painting by F.B. Carpenter. A subtitle notes: "From the original picture at the White House in 1864." Most examples - often selling for up to $2,000 - have extensive foxing - this print is quite bright and clean. Each figure is identified by individual captions. A really dramatic work to fill a wall. (Est. $1,000-1,500)
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901. A Large Bust Portrait of Lincoln, hand colored lithograph 22 x 29", published by William Smith, Philadelphia. Minor toning at margins, tape mark at bottom, all of which can easily be matted out, else fine condition. A truly impressive study. (Est. $300-500)
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902. Lincoln by Lesch... a very scarce and formidable portrait! A large, striking hand colored engraving 21 x 30" published by Rudolph Lesch, New York. Extremely light foxing, else fine. An impressive work that would look wonderful in one's office or study! (Est. $400-800)
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903. Lincoln Standing Tall. A large engraving by John Sartain of Philadelphia and published by William Smith of the same, 14 x 20 1/4" (15 1/2 x 20" overall). Bearing motif of the Emancipation Proclamation breaking the symbolic shackles of slavery in lower margin. (This very example was obtained from the late Ralph Newman... one of his last sales prior to closing down his business!) Very fine. (Est. $200-400)
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904. "The Home of Abraham Lincoln." Engraved by John McRae of New York after a drawing by Paul Dixon, 1866. 15 x 11" (24 x 19" overall). Light margin else fine. (Est. $100-150)
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905. "Columbia's Noblest Sons." A large lithograph by Kimmel & Forster of New York, 1865. 20 x 14" (23 1/2 x 18 3/4" overall) with portraits of Lincoln and Washington flanking Columbia (in a kepi) who holds garlands over their heads. Besides light toning at extreme top margin, extremely fine. Perhaps the cleanest copy extant... bright... (Est. $300-500)
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906. Abraham Lincoln by Sartain. An extremely sharp and rich engraving, 10 x 13" (19 x 24" overall). Published by Rice & Allen, Chicago together with Samuel Sartain, Philadelphia, 1866. Light soling at extreme margins, otherwise extremely fine condition. (Est. $200-400)
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907. "A Council of War in '61." A fanciful engraving by H. B. Hall & G. E. Perine, 19 x 14" (26 x 20" overall), bearing portraits of Lincoln, Seward, Scott, Cameron, McClellan, Butler, Wool, Anderson, Fremont, and Dix. Published in 1866, quite dramatic - every subject seems to be looking off into the distance! Lightly toned at margins with minor loss a top right, else very fine. (Est. $200-300)
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909. Abraham Lincoln by E. D. Marchant. A rich engraving by John Sartain of Philadelphia, 10 x 13" (15 x 18" overall), 1864. Engraved after the oil by Marchant painted in the White House in 1863. With facsimile signature in titling. Light foxing at outer margins, else very fine with excellent detail and contrast. (Est. $150-250)
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910. Bust Engraving of Lincoln. A simple engraving by John C. McRae, New York. 7 1/4 x 10 1/2" neatly mounted to a 13 x 16" sheet. Mount bears a few minor spots while the engraving is very close to pristine. (Est. $50-100)
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911. A large display item - after the photo by Berger. A large, hand colored engraved study after Anthony Berger's portrait taken at Brady's Washington Gallery, February 9, 1864. Lovely, warm colors with striking contrast. Housed in an oval, period Victorian frame in lime sherbet coloring with gilt accents with original glass. 25 x 31" overall, not examined out of frame, appears to be in near pristine condition. (Est. $300-500)
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912. "Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the United States. Born February 12, 1809, Died April 16, 1865." Lithograph printed on a beige oval background. 13 x 17"Minor tears and chipping to margins, a few minor creases and spots. A scarce study. (Est. $400-500)
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913. "Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the United States." Hand colored with red highlights, by Kimmel & Foster, New York. 8 x 11". Two minor marginal tears not affecting image. (Est. $80-100)
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914. "Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the United States." 8 x 11 print by an unknown publisher, small loss at bottom corner, minor stain at bottom margin, else fine. (Est. $50-80)
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915. "President Lincoln & Cabinet." A very rare print, 10 x 14" (24 x 29" framed overall) by J. H. Bufford and published by Elliot and White, Boston. Subtitled Presented to the Subscribers of the Watchman & Reflector. With respects of Ford Olmstead & Co. Horizontal mat burn else fine condition. Tastefully framed.
(Est. $400-600)
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916. "President Lincoln at Genl. Grant's Headquarters at City Point, Va. March, 1865." An excellent 1865 hand-colored Currier and Ives print depicting Lincoln, Sherman, Sheridan and Grant. Light foxing and dampstains blend in nicely detracting little. Tastefully framed to 21 x 17 1/2" with gold trim. This one is extremely scarce. (Est. $600-800)
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917. Framed small folio Currier & Ives lithograph, published in 1862, "Battle of Fredericksburg, Va. Decr. 13th 1862." Contains four lines of verses beneath the title: "...Though driven back by an intrenched and hidden foe, the Soldiers of the North are still as ready to meet the Traitors of the South, as in their days of proudest victory." Hand-colored primarily in blue and green. One border tear going 2" into image, trimmed close on right, staining, some faults on top margin. Not examined outside of frame. (Est. Est. $80-120)
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918. "U.S. Iron Clad Battery ONONDAGA." A wonderful lithograph picturing the iron clad in rough waters. By Endicott & Co., 59 Beekman St., New York, 31.5 x 17.5" (33.5 x 21" framed). The Onondaga was completed in Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1864 and supported Grant's drive on Richmond patrolling the James River. Below the image has been added the essential specifications for the iron clad. Several burn marks at margins and at top of image, very light toning, small hole at right margin of image which could be easily repaired, else very crisp and sharp, very good condition. Housed in a period frame, period glass. (Est. $200-400)
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919. U.S.S. Kearsarge v. C.S.S. Alabama. An 1887 "Aquarelle Facsimile Print" by the noted climolithographer, Louis Prang of Boston. 27 x 21" (33 x 27" framed overall). Entitled "Kearsarge and Alabama / Hauling down the Flag", this dramatic print depicts the famous sinking of the Confederate raider off the coast of France in 1864 as seen from the deck of the Kearsarge. Very light toning at margins, tear at top margin, small losses at bottom right corner, else very good. Simply framed. (Est. $300-500)
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Original pencil sketch and watercolor
of the War Mascot "Old Abe."


920. A most curious and interesting original work on paper of "Old Abe", a bald eagle kept by the members of Company C in the Eighth Wisconsin (The Eagle Regiment). Accomplished in a mix of charcoal, pastel and watercolor, 19 x 29" (27 x 36.5" framed overall), by Beth R. Wands, who described herself as a "National Mother of Sons of Union Veterans." At the top she writes in pencil: "On the twenty sixth day of March 1881, the old soldier eagle with a few of his old friends around him died in the arms of his keeper, George Gillies. This picture was done by mother Beth Wands who saw the old soldier bird many times when he was alive, has visited the place Eagle Point, where he was taken from the nest. Mother Wands is 85 years old and also the National Mother of Sons of Union Veterans." At right she inscribes the drawing "To Jack Mankey from Mother Beth R. Wands, Dec. 25, 1928". At the bottom she repeats the familiar story of Old Abe. Housed in a ornate gilt frame with period glass. Light to moderate toning, dampstain and tears along right margin, else very good. (Est. $1,000-2,000)
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921. Lincoln by Turzak. A most impressive set of four (4) woodcuts by Charles Turzak (1899-1986) from his 36 print suite, "Abraham Lincoln: Biography in Woodcuts" which was produced for the Century of Progress Chicago World's Fair in 1933. Each is part of a limited series of 100 and each is signed in pencil by Turzak. Printed on fine woven paper, each is expertly hinged at top and matted in heavy card stock. Titles include "Lincoln's Birthplace" (35 of 100, 12 x 10"), "The Prairie President" (82 of 100, 9 x 12"), "Lincoln- Student Days" (46 of 100, 13 x 10"), and "Lincoln" (19 of 100, 11 x 15"). Mats measure 16 x 20" each, and all of the prints are in near pristine condition. (Est. $500-750)
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922. A wonderful set of two (2) etchings of by Bernhardt Wall, one of Lincoln seated at his desk, the other of his birthplace, both signed in pencil below. Each are approximately 3 x 4" on 7 x 9" sheets. Both in fine condition.
(Est. $50-80)
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Seven original masterpieces by the
great illustrator Noel Sickles.


923. Seven (7) illustrations constituting "Scenes from the life of Abraham Lincoln," each an ink and brown wash study, various sizes, six signed by the artist. Noel Sickles (1910-1982), an American commercial illustrator and cartoonist, was most famous for the comic strip Scorchy Smith. Yet his extensive career, marked by talented depth and range - from drawing political satire in the 1920's to studies for National Geographic in the 1970's - remains of tremendous importance. Sickles drew for the Associated Press, worked closely with "Terry and the Pirates" creator Milton Caniff (and is believed to have actually ghost-drawn the strip!), and is credited with fathering a unique style that influenced generations of other comic strip artists. His compositions were cinematic in style with a brisk, impressionistic way of inking that he referred to as "chiaroscuro." As noted in a retrospective of his career (issue #242, The Comics Journal), "The term 'artist's artist' is woefully overused, a cold comfort to an artist who finds himself publicly praised by his better-known and wealthier peers -- in some cases, the source of that success being work created in or inspired by his style -- to no discernable improvement in his own fame and fortune. Noel Sickles casts a long shadow.... [his] impressionistic approach to inking, sure-handed chiaroscuro and a cinematic eye for staging action, as well as an almost painterly approach... His never-ending artistic restlessness and the stinginess of newspaper syndicates drove Sickles out of the comics field and into magazine illustration at an early age, but his influence -- both direct and indirect -- continues to be felt today."
This collection includes: #1: Tussling with another man. 7.75 x 12", not signed (though sheet is embossed with artist's name). #2: Rescuing a young woman's pig. 9.75 x 12.25", signed lower right. #3: Reading newspaper at back of wagon. 13.25 x 9.5", signed lower center. #4: Fitted for a new suit. 11 x 7", signed lower right. #5: Debating with Stephen Douglass. 9.25 x 9.25", signed lower left. #6: Visiting a sickbed. 10 x 11.75" signed lower right. #7: Standing at back of train car. 12.25 x 8.75", signed lower right.
A unique interpretation of points in the life of Abraham Lincoln by one of the masters of illustration. A fabulous holding of original artwork. (Est. $2,000-4,000)
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[The following original works - illustrations and cartoons published in American newspapers - were each presented to Herbert Wells Fay by their artists. Fay (1859-1949) was Custodian at the Lincoln Tomb at Oak Ridge Cemetery for 28 years. He amassed a huge Lincoln collection (a great deal obtained under "questionable" circumstances!). These great illustrations speak to the power of using Lincoln's image to convey social commentary and even tell a joke.]

924. A warm original illustration 17 1/2 x 15", in ink and graphite, a standing portrait of Lincoln flanked by his boyhood cabin on side and the U.S. Capitol on the other. Tilted "Father Abraham" at bottom center. Light soiling at extreme margins, else fine. (Est. $200-300)
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925. A large original illustration for a newspaper cartoon, by Dorman H. Smith (1892-1956) 18 x 21" in ink and grease pencil. Quoting Lincoln's first inaugural: "Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better or equal hope in the world?" Inscribed to Fay by Smith at right and signed again by Smith at lower left. Light soling at margins, else fine. (Est. $300-400)
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926. An original newspaper cartoon illustration by H. Jackson c. 1941-45, 12 x 15 1/2", in ink and grease pencil depicting Lincoln solemnly looking over the body of a dead soldier. Inscribed in white grease pencil by Jackson to Fay. Glue remnants at margins could be easily matted out to make a terrific presentation. Powerful! (Est. $150-250)
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927. An original illustration by Chicago Tribune artist, Carl Somdal, 13 3/4 x 16 1/2" in ink and grease pencil depicting the spirit of Lincoln looking over massed troops marching off to war. Hand titled caption at top: "'Let us have faith that right makes right'". Printed in the Illinois State Journal Feb. 12, 1939. Signed by Somdal at lower right. A few minor toned spots at margins, else very fine. (Est. $150-250)
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928. Cartoon commentary from the Centennial of Lincoln's birth! A fabulous pen and ink original work by the artist L.D. Bradley that ran in the News (city?), February 1, 1909. An impressive work, 18 x 19", making "An Uncomfortable" comparison with "the New Statesman" (the modern politician shown quite pale with a tally sheet in his pocket titled "my little schemes." (Nothing really changes!) The detail of all the hoopla celebrating Lincoln's anniversary is wonderful. The bottom corner is adorned by an albumen portrait of the artist. GREAT! (Est. $300-500)
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929. A most striking 26 x 18" oval plaster high relief of Lincoln in profile. Bearing the etched signature "Pickett 1873" at lower left, this is an early display piece. A tiny brass plaque at the bottom indicates the piece hung in the offices of Lincoln National Life Insurance Company of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Several cracks and and flakes mostly at the right of the visage detract little from the overall presentation. Worthy of professional restoration which could enhance the presentation. (Est. $500-700)
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930. A classic display of respect and admiration! These once adorned parlors across the country - a silvered, bas-relief profile housed in a period, quite deep shadowbox frame with original green felt in the background. Patented in 1865 and marked "J. Powell F. (fecit)." We don't believe these are necessarily mourning pieces but possibly end-of-the war celebratory items - examples are also seen with Grant and McClellan. Some wear to bust resulting in the loss of some paint lends to patina and presentation. A fine display item. (Est. $300-500)
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931. Quite impressive, 1876 Centennial work by Gillander, famed glassworks creating magnificent works in molten and shaped glass. This desirable piece, 5" tall, hollow on verso, does not come onto the market often. This example is void of any chipping or cracks as usually found. A magnificent specimen. (Est. $200-300)
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932. 1864 oval milk glass tray depicting a raised head of Lincoln to 3/4 left with a border of interlaced fence rails. Listed in Lindsay's American Historical Glass as "Lincoln Logs Plaque," it is attributed to the election of 1864. Dimensions are 6 3/4 x 8". We have also seen examples of this plaque executed in amber glass. The exact date of its manufacture has always been the subject of some conjecture. We can say with certainty that it is early -- most likely mid-19th century. This specimen is flawless, absolutely MINT! (Est. $300-400)
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933. Standing placque with bas relief profile. A lovely, bas-relief profile of Lincoln rendered by Ivorex circa 1909. The three-dimensional quality of this textured visage, we believe made of a bakelite type material, yields a quite striking presentation. Housed in a simple solid wood frame with stand, ready for display on your desk! 5 x 7" (Est. $300-500)
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A significant work of folk art... a huge,
period Berlinwork textile.

934. A large 16 x 22" (27 x 34" overall framed) and colorful example Victorian needlework, c. 1860s-1870s. After the painting and later print by Alnozo Chappel. Most likely an example of Berlin needlework in which the needle worker would embroider an image after a pre-set pattern on canvas. A wonderful example with still bright and vivid colors and shadings. Nicely matted and framed with gilt trim. (Est. $2,000-2,500)
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A most impressive, detailed work.


935. A rare work by John Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum (1871-1941). General Robert E. Lee bas relief bronze plaque. Signed, 16 x 14". This massive bas relief of Gen. Lee was probably made on the occasion of the creation of the Stone Mountain, GA Confederate Monument - the stone carving in relief of the South's great Confederate men (Lee, Jackson, & Mosby). This plaque was probably to be used in an administrative building on the site or to be given to one of Stone Mountain's benefactors. Borglum, of course, was also the principal sculptor of Mt. Rushmore. He did not finish the Stone Mtn. carving as he left that position on rumors that the principle owner of Stone Mtn. wanted to add another image to the carving as a KKK rider & Borglum did not want to do that! This is heavy, powerful, dramatic. (Est. $3,000-3,500)
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936. He kept the flame of Lincoln and the Republicans burning bright into the 20th century! (Only to be somewhat snuffed by Harding, Coolidge, Hoover... etc.) A bronze by James E. Fraser (1876-1953) of President Theodore Roosevelt, inscribed with one of TR's favorite sayings,"Aggressive fighting for the right is the noblest sport in the world." Signed and dated 1920, measures 10 x 13". These castings were made for those donating to the Brooklyn Public Library - many were cast in iron, but few were cast in bronze (this denoted a higher contribution to the library!). An excellent display. (Est. $600-900)
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937. An elegant, really lovely portrait miniature under glass. We believe this to be executed on a wafer-thin piece of ivory, housed under custom-fit convex glass recessed into a handsome, period frame of inlay or marquetry ivory. Portrait measures 2 1/2 x 3 1/2" (site), 4.25 x 5" overall, minor wear along extreme perimeter. Signed by the artist, "Vest", after the Berger portrait, warm, natural colors make this a particularly desirable work... one of the nicest we've seen. (Est. $1,000-2,000)
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938. "Abraham Lincoln as a father." A stunningly pristine (looks like it was printed yesterday!) mounted albumen, 6 x 8" oval, 15 x 17 1/4" overall in an archival frame, published as a tribute in 1865 by Charles Desilver, Philadelphia. Extremely clean ... this presents exceptionally well with a powerful presence. (Est. $300-500)
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